Developers

Integration of external application details (Part 3)

Integration of external application details (Part 3)

In Part 2 of this series, we took a high-level view of the common architectural elements that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

I laid out how I’ve approached the use case and how I’ve used successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for researching a generic architectural blueprint. The only thing left to cover was the order in which you’ll be led through the blueprint details.

This article takes you deeper to cover details pertaining to the specific elements (mobile and web application deployments) of the generic architectural overview.

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Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

It’s been some time since I last talked with you about putting JBoss BPM Suite (now called Red Hat Process Automation Manager) into your cloud, and with the new release, it’s time to talk AppDev in the cloud again.

It’s time to update the story and see how to put Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud so you are set up with a standard configuration to start your first business rules project.

With the easy installation demo project described below, you can leverage process automation tooling through the business central web console running containerized on any Red Hat OpenShift.

Let’s take a closer look at how this works.

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Common architectural elements for modern integration architectures (Part 2)

Common architectural elements for modern integration architectures (Part 2)

In Part 1 of this series, we explored a use case around integration being the key to transforming your customer experience.

I laid out how I’ve approached the use case and how I’ve used successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for researching a generic architectural blueprint. The only thing left to cover was the order in which you’ll be led through the blueprint details.

This article, which is Part 2 of the series, starts the real journey at the very top, with a generic architecture from which we’ll discuss the common architectural elements one by one.

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Application Modernization and Migration Tech Talk + Scotland JBug Meetup

Application Modernization and Migration Tech Talk + Scotland JBug Meetup

I’m heading back to my friends in Scotland to speak at the JBoss User Group (JBug) Scotland next month. It’s a fun group of people who really seem to enjoy working with open source and JBoss software stacks.

First off, on June 6th there will be a wonderful tech talk on application modernization and migration. This is followed by the JBug Scotland hosting a  hands-on workshop. Come and get hands-on experience in a workshop showcasing application development in the cloud using containers, JBoss middleware, services, business logic, and APIs.

The events are on June 6th, 2018 from 14:00 onwards and are scheduled as follows.

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How to Get Developers to Adopt Your Product

How to Get Developers to Adopt Your Product

Recently, I participated in a focus group where developers were asked to discuss how they make technology adoption decisions. Even “the big guys” seem unsure of how to get developers to notice and adopt their products. So, in this post, I’m going to try to reduce our learning and adoption process down to some concrete steps. The truth is, we don’t just pick up tools, components, libraries, or languages just to complete a particular task or project. In truth, any technology we adopt has to help us do one or more of three important jobs. The more of these jobs your product can do, the more likely developers will pick it up and stick with it.

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Wearable Tech: A Developer’s Security Nightmare

Wearable Tech: A Developer’s Security Nightmare

Web developers and IT professionals are the foundations of any quality business’ data security.

However, with technology constantly changing and evolving as well as becoming more consumer-friendly, this data’s vulnerability only increases and it can often be hard to even notice how this new technology can actually affect your company until it occurs. Despite this, ignorance to modern hacking techniques does not refute their inability to transform even the smallest of devices into a weapon with which to infect or intrude upon data and the effects of this on a company can mean massive destruction in the infrastructure and beyond.

One of the newest data security threats posed to the IoT, in particular, is the rise of the wearable technology industry. With companies like FitBit and Google developing glasses, fitness trackers, and watches that make everyday life a little bit easier, it may seem as if the wearable tech industry is nothing more than a fun and exciting way to incorporate technology into the average consumer’s life, however, this is not entirely the case.

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Java Language Support for Visual Studio Code has landed

Java Language Support for Visual Studio Code has landed

Java language server is an implementation of the language server protocol for Java. If you recall, language server protocol provides a common way for editors and IDEs to integrate with language smartness providers. By design, all of the language tooling magic happens on the Java language server, and can provide same level of smartness to tools that support the protocol. In fact, we are working with communities such as Eclipse Che to make this server available for their tools.

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A Linux Cheat Sheet for Developers

I first started using computers in the mid-80’s.  A DOS-based computer, where – as a programmer – I had to first learn how to type and how to navigate a seemingly arcane series of commands.  There was no mouse back in those days.  Today, as a developer, I spend most of my day on a Windows or Mac OSX-based laptop and use Linux within a virtual machine (VM) inside a hypervisor like VirtualBox or Hyper-V.   

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