developer

Which task is getting all the CPU processor cycles?

If an important task is processor limited, one would like to make sure that the task is getting as much processor time as possible and other tasks are not delaying the execution of the important task. The SystemTap example script, cycle_thief.stp, lists what interrupts and other tasks run on the same processor as the important task. The cycle_thief.stp script provides the following pieces of information:

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Git Bonsai, or Keeping Your Branches Well Pruned

Today, we’ll share a small victory in our DevOps journey at Red Hat IT. This cross-team collaboration has saved our IT organization some headaches and wasted time. We open-sourced the code, hoping it can help you, too.

The Dev problem, from Sam Van Oort:

Old, pruned git branches are sometimes re-created by accident, making a mess for our developers.

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Starting with SystemTap

As I stare at this blank screen to start writing my first blog entry I have that same feeling that so many developers have when starting with an unfamiliar programming language or application.  The developers in our group realize that it is not easy starting from nothing and we strive to make it easier to productively use SystemTap to investigate performance problems.

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7 ways to improve your application’s performance with the new Developer Toolset 1.1 release

Are you missing out on opportunities to increase your applications’ performance? As an application developer building on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, you invest a lot of time and effort into making your applications compelling and useful for your users. You probably also want to see good performance. But beyond good design, careful algorithm selection and compiler optimizations, what can a developer use to boost their application performance?

1. The latest GCC release and associated tools

The very first thing a Red Hat Enterprise Linux developer should be aware of is the availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset. I described the content and architecture of this new offering from Red Hat in my last blog post. Developer Toolset 1.x gives you the gcc-4.7 toolchain, which, at the time of writing, is the current upstream major release.

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Is your C++ development team missing out? Developer Toolset: newer tools on and for multiple RHEL releases

Wouldn’t it be nice if your software development team could use one common set of development tools based on the latest, stable upstream versions for your Red Hat Enterprise Linux development? Think of all the extra years of open source innovation – the features, optimizations and new standards support it would allow your team to build into your products. That would be great, wouldn’t it?

Fortunately, this is already available to you today, and in this blog post I’ll explain how it works and how you can get it. Red Hat Developer Toolset provides a set of additional tools installed in parallel with those delivered as part of Red Hat Enterprise Linux itself. Currently featuring the GCC C/C++ compiler and GDB debugger and backed up by Red Hat’s solid customer support, Red Hat Developer Toolset 1.0 is a great way to unlock performance in your team and your software very easily.

And if you’re already a Red Hat Developer Program subscriber, you can install the tools right now. The Red Hat Developer Toolset version 1.1 Beta, released in October 2012,
showcased a good number of additional performance analysis tools. We’re just getting started with this new offering and have plans to include other tools in the future.

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Welcome to the Red Hat developer blog!

I’m writing this first entry at about 30,000 feet on my way back from Red Hat’s North American Partner Conference in San Diego, California. It’s rather appropriate to be typing this out at that altitude, as that is the way I felt for the entire conference after having the opportunity to meet with some amazing ISV, Systems Integrator, VAR and Solution Builder partners who have been building some incredibly powerful solutions using Red Hat technologies. The consistent theme across all of these conversations was making sure that the developers within these organizations had a deep relationship with Red Hat, an understanding of our technology and architecture roadmap as well as the chance to provide more input into how we can all work together.

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