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Understanding malloc behavior using Systemtap userspace probes

The malloc family of functions are critical for almost every serious application program. Its performance characteristics often have a big impact on the performance of applications. Given that the default malloc implementation needs to have consistent performance for all general cases, it makes available a number of tunables that can help developers tweak its behavior to suit their programs.

About two years ago I had written an article on the Red Hat Customer Portal that described the high level design of the GNU C Library memory allocator and also introduced the reader to various magic environment variables that malloc understands to change its behavior. The behavior documented in that article and the tricks to tweak malloc behavior hold just as true for RHEL-7, which is based on upstream glibc 2.17 as they did for RHEL-6, which is based on upstream glibc 2.12.

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Dave and Gunnar #55: Mike Guerette loves developers.

The Dave and Gunnar Show is run by two great guys and Red Hatters who do “government stuff”.  We crossed paths again recently and so did this podcast about Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Program, related developer subscriptions, etc.  Listen to our conversation and I hope you enjoy Dave and Gunnar’s creative hack of my pic – I don’t get no respect.  😉

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Which task is getting all the CPU processor cycles?

If an important task is processor limited, one would like to make sure that the task is getting as much processor time as possible and other tasks are not delaying the execution of the important task. The SystemTap example script, cycle_thief.stp, lists what interrupts and other tasks run on the same processor as the important task. The cycle_thief.stp script provides the following pieces of information:

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Git Bonsai, or Keeping Your Branches Well Pruned

Today, we’ll share a small victory in our DevOps journey at Red Hat IT. This cross-team collaboration has saved our IT organization some headaches and wasted time. We open-sourced the code, hoping it can help you, too.

The Dev problem, from Sam Van Oort:

Old, pruned git branches are sometimes re-created by accident, making a mess for our developers.

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Starting with SystemTap

As I stare at this blank screen to start writing my first blog entry I have that same feeling that so many developers have when starting with an unfamiliar programming language or application.  The developers in our group realize that it is not easy starting from nothing and we strive to make it easier to productively use SystemTap to investigate performance problems.

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7 ways to improve your application’s performance with the new Developer Toolset 1.1 release

Are you missing out on opportunities to increase your applications’ performance? As an application developer building on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, you invest a lot of time and effort into making your applications compelling and useful for your users. You probably also want to see good performance. But beyond good design, careful algorithm selection and compiler optimizations, what can a developer use to boost their application performance?

1. The latest GCC release and associated tools

The very first thing a Red Hat Enterprise Linux developer should be aware of is the availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset. I described the content and architecture of this new offering from Red Hat in my last blog post. Developer Toolset 1.x gives you the gcc-4.7 toolchain, which, at the time of writing, is the current upstream major release.

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Is your C++ development team missing out? Developer Toolset: newer tools on and for multiple RHEL releases

Wouldn’t it be nice if your software development team could use one common set of development tools based on the latest, stable upstream versions for your Red Hat Enterprise Linux development? Think of all the extra years of open source innovation – the features, optimizations and new standards support it would allow your team to build into your products. That would be great, wouldn’t it?

Fortunately, this is already available to you today, and in this blog post I’ll explain how it works and how you can get it. Red Hat Developer Toolset provides a set of additional tools installed in parallel with those delivered as part of Red Hat Enterprise Linux itself. Currently featuring the GCC C/C++ compiler and GDB debugger and backed up by Red Hat’s solid customer support, Red Hat Developer Toolset 1.0 is a great way to unlock performance in your team and your software very easily.

And if you’re already a Red Hat Developer Program subscriber, you can install the tools right now. The Red Hat Developer Toolset version 1.1 Beta, released in October 2012,
showcased a good number of additional performance analysis tools. We’re just getting started with this new offering and have plans to include other tools in the future.

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