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Efficient string copying and concatenation in C

Efficient string copying and concatenation in C

Among the most heavily used string handling functions declared in the standard C <string.h> header are those that copy and concatenate strings. Both sets of functions copy characters from one object to another, and both return their first argument: a pointer to the beginning of the destination object. The choice of the return value is a source of inefficiency that is the subject of this article.

The code examples shown in this article are for illustration only. They should not be viewed as recommended practice and may contain subtle bugs.

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DevNation Live: Revisiting Effective Java in 2019

DevNation Live: Revisiting Effective Java in 2019

DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, Edson Yanaga, Director of Developer Experience at Red Hat, reviews some tips from the classic Effective Java book to help you update your Java skills.

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How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Process automation tooling

How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Process automation tooling

The release of the latest Red Hat developer suite version 12 included a name change from Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio to Red Hat CodeReady Studio. The focus here is not on the Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces, a cloud and container development experience, but on the locally installed developers studio. Given that, you might have questions about how to get started with the various Red Hat integration, data, and process automation product toolsets that are not installed out of the box.

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10 tips for reviewing code you don’t like

10 tips for reviewing code you don’t like

As a frequent contributor to open source projects (both within and beyond Red Hat), I find one of the most common time-wasters is dealing with code reviews of my submitted code that are negative or obstructive and yet essentially subjective or argumentative in nature. I see this most often when submitting to projects where the maintainer doesn’t like the change, for whatever reason. In the best case, this kind of code review strategy can lead to time wasted in pointless debates; at worst, it actively discourages contribution and diversity in a project and creates an environment that is hostile and elitist.

A code review should be objective and concise and should deal in certainties whenever possible. It’s not a political or emotional argument; it’s a technical one, and the goal should always be to move forward and elevate the project and its participants.  A change submission should always be evaluated on the merits of the submission, not on one’s opinion of the submitter.

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Shenandoah GC in JDK 13, Part 3: Architectures and operating systems

Shenandoah GC in JDK 13, Part 3: Architectures and operating systems

In this series, I’ve been covering new developments of Shenandoah GC coming up in JDK 13. In part 1, I looked at the switch to load reference barriers, and, in part 2, I looked at plans for eliminating an extra word per object. In this article, I’ll look at a new architecture and a new operating system that Shenandoah GC will be working with.

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Project Loom: Lightweight Java threads

Project Loom: Lightweight Java threads

Building responsiveness applications is a never-ending task. With the rise of powerful and multicore CPUs, more raw power is available for applications to consume. In Java, threads are used to make the application work on multiple tasks concurrently. A developer starts a Java thread in the program, and tasks are assigned to this thread to get processed. Threads can do a variety of tasks, such as read from a file, write to a database, take input from a user, and so on.

In this article, we’ll explain more about threads and introduce Project Loom, which supports high-throughput and lightweight concurrency in Java to help simplify writing scalable software.

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Application lifecycle management for container-native development

Application lifecycle management for container-native development

Container-native development is primarily about consistency, flexibility, and scalability. Legacy Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) tooling often is not, leading to situations where it:

  • Places artificial barriers on development speed, and therefore time to value,
  • Creates single points of failure in the infrastructure, and
  • Stifles innovation through inflexibility.

Ultimately, developers are expensive, but they are the domain experts in what they build. With development teams often being treated as product teams (who own the entire lifecycle and support of their applications), it becomes imperative that they control the end-to-end process on which they rely to deliver their applications into production. This means decentralizing both the ALM process and the tooling that supports that process. In this article, we’ll explore this approach and look at a couple of implementation scenarios.

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Modern business logic tooling workshop, lab 4: Create a process

Modern business logic tooling workshop, lab 4: Create a process

Since starting to update the free online rules and process automation workshops that showcase how to get started using modern business logic tooling, you’ve come a long way with process automation. The updates started with moving from JBoss BPM  to Red Hat Decision Manager and from JBoss BPM Suite to Red Hat Process Automation Manager.

In previous labs, we showed how to install Red Hat Decision Manager on your laptop, how to create a new project, and how to create a domain model. This article highlights the newest lab update for Red Hat Process Automation Manager, where you learn to design a process.

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