Jug Summer Camp 2017, Vert.x and collaborative DJ mix

I had the pleasure to present “Eclipse Vert.x for Dj fun and for profit!” at the latest edition of the Jug Summer Camp in La Rochelle, France.

The Jug Summer Camp is a popular developer conference organized by Serli in western France, gathering regional attendees as well as speakers and participants from other French Java user groups.

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JBoss: Developer’s Guide

Modern applications development demands optimized tools and services. Applications must integrate with different systems and share data. Organizations must be able to immediately respond to changing conditions. JBoss Middleware drives enterprise application innovation every day to deliver the best projects and products. Whether you are an experienced enterprise application developer or just getting started, JBoss: Developer’s Guide provides you with the best time to value guide for enterprise application delivery with the JBoss brand, using hands-on coding and lab exercises with real-life business examples. In-depth information is provided for multiple components of the JBoss Middleware ecosystem to guide you through application development, deployment, data storage and access, communication and messaging, and business process optimization.

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From Java to .NET Core, Part 2: Types

In my previous post in the series, I discussed some fairly surface-level differences between C#/.NET and Java. These can be important for Java developers transitioning to .NET Core, to create code that looks and feels “native” to the new ecosystem. In this post, we dig beneath the surface, to understand .NET’s type system. It is my belief that, with Java in the rear view mirror, the .NET type system is more effective and enjoyable to write on. But you be the judge.

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From Java to .NET Core. Part 1

There was a time when the word “.NET” was virtually synonymous with bloat, vendor lock-in, and Windows. .NET Core is the exact opposite. It’s blazingly fast. It’s open source under a permissive license (Mostly MIT, some parts Apache-2.0). Unlike some other open-source platforms, .NET Core’s Contributor License Agreement does not grant exclusive privileges to a single corporation. .NET Core is cross-platform, allowing you to target Windows, Mac, Docker, and many flavors of Linux. My favorite resource for getting started with .NET core is Don Schenck’s free book. This post, I hope, can serve as an addendum specifically for Java developers exploring .NET’s flagship language, C#. While C# borrows much from Java, there are important differences to be aware of. Fortunately, some of them are for the better. In this series of posts, I’ll go over a few of the most prominent differences.

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