Announcing Developer Studio 11.3.0.GA, JBoss Tools 4.5.3 for Eclipse Oxygen.3a

The community editions of JBoss Tools 4.5.3 and JBoss Developer Studio 11.3 for Eclipse Oxygen.3a are here waiting for you. Check it out!

Installation

JBoss Developer Studio comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Simply download it from our JBoss Products page and run it like this:

java -jar jboss-devstudio-<installername>.jar

JBoss Tools or Bring-Your-Own-Eclipse (BYOE) JBoss Developer Studio require a bit more:

This release requires at least Eclipse 4.7 (Oxygen) but we recommend using the latest Eclipse 4.7.3a Oxygen JEE Bundle since then you get most of the dependencies preinstalled.

Once you have installed Eclipse, you can either find us on the Eclipse Marketplace under “JBoss Tools” or “Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio”.

For JBoss Tools, you can also use our update site directly.

http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/oxygen/stable/updates/

What is new?

Continue reading “Announcing Developer Studio 11.3.0.GA, JBoss Tools 4.5.3 for Eclipse Oxygen.3a”

Share

Expanding architectural choices to better arm Red Hat Enterprise Linux developers

Red Hat Enterprise Linux continues to deliver the best possible experience for enterprise system administrators and developers, as well as provide a solid foundation for moving workloads into both public and private clouds. One of the ways to enable such ubiquity is Red Hat’s multi-architecture initiative, which focuses on bringing Red Hat’s software portfolio to different hardware architectures.

Last week, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 went live. It brought forward several improvements relevant to developers and system administrators such as advanced GUI system management via the Cockpit console, which should help new Linux administrators, developers, and Windows users to perform expert tasks without having to get into the command line.

This release also marks a new milestone for Red Hat Enterprise Linux: all supported architectures are now simultaneously enabled. The list of supported architectures includes x86_64, PowerPC Big Endian and Little Endian, s390x, and the more recently introduced 64-bit Arm and IBM POWER9 architectures.

Continue reading “Expanding architectural choices to better arm Red Hat Enterprise Linux developers”

Share

GNU Toolchain Update – Spring 2018

The GNU Toolchain is a collection of programming tools produced by the GNU Project. The tools are often packaged together due to their common use for developing software applications, operating systems, and low-level software for embedded systems.

This blog is part of a series (see: Fall 2017 Update) covering the latest changes and improvements in the components that make up this Toolchain. Apart from the announcement of new releases, the features described here are at the bleeding edge of software development in the tools. This means that it may be awhile before they make it into production releases, and they might not be fully functional yet. But anyone who is interested in experimenting with them can build their own copy of the Toolchain and then try them out.

Continue reading “GNU Toolchain Update – Spring 2018”

Share

Istio Route Rules: Telling Service Requests Where To Go

OpenShift and Kubernetes do a great job of working to make sure calls to your microservice are routed to the correct pods. After all, that’s one of the raison d’être for Kubernetes: routing and load balancing. What if, however, you want to customize the routing? What if you want to run two versions at the same time? How do Istio Route Rules handle this?

Continue reading “Istio Route Rules: Telling Service Requests Where To Go”

Share

Using Byteman to Find Out Why the TimeZone Changed on a Java App Server

This article is about a real problem I faced where the timezone on a Java application server (in my case it was JBoss) changed unexpectedly during the run time of the server. It was hard to find any pattern or the reason for the change, as it was triggered by a HTTP request. To debug this scenario, I used the Byteman tool and injected the script into the JVM. This helped me to identify the root cause of the issue and come up with a few Do’s and Don’ts for a shared JVM (like on Java application servers).

Any application server is considered a shared JVM. There are multiple applications deployed on the JVM and they share the same resources. In such a scenario, there are some precautions which need to be taken care of. One of them is dealing with the JVM’s timezone.

Byteman is a tool that makes it easy to trace, monitor, and test the behavior of Java applications and the JDK runtime code. It injects Java code into your application APIs or into Java runtime methods without the need for you to recompile, repackage, or even redeploy your application. Injection can be performed at startup or in running code.

Continue reading “Using Byteman to Find Out Why the TimeZone Changed on a Java App Server”

Share

Eclipse CheConf 2018 – Join the live stream February 21st at 10 am EST

CheConf 2018, the second Eclipse Che user and developer virtual conference is happening on February 21st. This one-day virtual conference explains how cloud developer workspaces are changing the way applications are created, and how companies are building cloud-native developer tools. Eclipse Che is the largest extensible cloud development platform in the market, with over 150,000 public developer sessions a month. Join hundreds of fellow Che users in sessions that include how-tos, case studies, and community talks from experts throughout the Eclipse Che community.

The live stream starts at 10:00 EST on February 21st with a series of 30 minute sessions and 1 hour tutorials. Live chat and Q&A will be moderated by Che committers.

Join the fun, learn about cloud development, and see how organizations large and small are benefiting from Che. Register early to guarantee your spot.

Continue reading “Eclipse CheConf 2018 – Join the live stream February 21st at 10 am EST”

Share

Annobin – Storing Extra Information in Binaries

Introduction

Compiled files, often called binaries, are a mainstay of modern computer systems. But it is often hard for system builders and users to find out more than just very basic information about these files. The Annobin project exists as means to answer questions like:

  • How was this binary built?
  • What testing was performed on the binary?
  • What sources were used to make the binary ?

The Annobin project is an implementation of the Watermark specification , which details how to record extra information in a binary. One important feature of this specification is that it includes an address range for the information stored. This makes it possible to record the fact that part of a binary was compiled with one set of options and another part was recorded with a different set of options.

Continue reading “Annobin – Storing Extra Information in Binaries”

Share

Scheduling Voxxed Days Zurich 2018 with OptaPlanner

My name is Mario Fusco and I’m honored to be the Program Committee Lead of Voxxed Days Zurich for the third year in a row. Reading, evaluating, discussing, and selecting from the 200+ proposals that arrive every year is a long and challenging process. I must admit, I largely underestimated the task the first year I started doing it. It’s necessary to evaluate not only the quality of every submission, but also how they fit together. In the end, the worst part is having to reject so many incredible proposals because there are a limited number of slots.

Continue reading “Scheduling Voxxed Days Zurich 2018 with OptaPlanner”

Share

Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) With Nested KVM

Why

If you are like me, you probably prefer to install new and exploratory software in a fresh virtual machine (VM) or container to insulate your laptop/desktop from software pollution (TM). Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) relies on virtualization to create a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) virtual machine to run OpenShift (based on Kubernetes). Red Hat specifically supports installation of the CDK on Windows, macOS, and RHEL Server, but if you are running Fedora, RHEL Workstation, or even CentOS, you will run into trouble. If you are not running a supported desktop, you can always use a RHEL Server virtual machine, and this tutorial is for you.

Continue reading “Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) With Nested KVM”

Share