Developer Tools

Getting started with Tekton on Red Hat OpenShift

Getting started with Tekton on Red Hat OpenShift

I recently heard about Tekton as an alternative for Jenkins on Red Hat OpenShift. What got my attention was that Tekton uses Operators as building blocks, and Operators are something I am also interested in. I don’t want to get ahead of myself, though; so we’ll start with installing Tekton on Red Hat OpenShift. Installing on Kubernetes is also possible, but for now the focus is on OpenShift.

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Eclipse Wild Web Developer adds a powerful YAML editor with built-in Kubernetes support

Eclipse Wild Web Developer adds a powerful YAML editor with built-in Kubernetes support

YAML Ain’t Markup Language (YAML) has grown increasingly popular during the past few years. It is a human-readable text-based format for specifying configuration information and is used in many platforms, such as Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift.

Eclipse Wild Web Developer is a language-based extension that provides a rich development experience for developing typical web and configuration files in the Eclipse IDE. According to the project page, “Eclipse Wild Web Developer relies on existing mainstream and maintained components to provide the language smartness, over popular configuration files like TextMate and protocols like Language Server Protocol  or Debug Adapter Protocol.”

Recently, the YAML Language Server has been integrated into Eclipse Wild Web Developer. This is a feature-rich YAML Language Server implementation that also powers editors including VSCode, Eclipse Che, and Atom. This integration brings all the features that Language Server supports, including validation, autocompletion, hover support, and document outlining to the Eclipse Generic Editor, making it much easier to write and maintain YAML files.

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10 things developers need to know about JShell

10 things developers need to know about JShell

JShell was introduced in JDK 9 as part of Java Enhancement Proposal (JEP) 222 under project Kulla. Many programming languages, such as JavaScript, Python, Ruby, etc., provide easy-to-use, command-line tools for their execution, but Java was still missing such a utility. So, JDK 9 introduced the Java shell (JShell) tool.

I discussed the basics of JShell (which is a Read-Evaluate-Print-Loop; REPL) in a previous article. In this article, I’ll cover advanced concepts in JShell that users should know for rapid development.

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Build and run Buildah inside a Podman container

Build and run Buildah inside a Podman container

This past Christmas I gave my wife a set of nesting dolls similar to Russian Matryoshka dolls. If you’re not familiar with them, they consist of a wooden doll, which opens to reveal another doll, inside which you’ll find another doll, and so on until you get to the smallest and often most ornate doll of them all.  This concept got me thinking about nesting containers.

I thought I’d try building my own nesting container using Podman to create a container in which I could do Buildah development and also spin up Buildah containers and images. Once this Podman container was created, I could move it to any Linux platform that supported Podman and do development on Buildah from it. In this article, I’ll show how I set it up.

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Announcing Red Hat CodeReady Studio, the latest evolution of Red Hat Developer Studio

Announcing Red Hat CodeReady Studio, the latest evolution of Red Hat Developer Studio

Red Hat has been shipping a distribution of Eclipse IDE for years now, including all of the great features of Eclipse along with the add-ons, plugins, and tooling that make working with our products easy and enjoyable. These distributions have gone by different names over the years to indicate how they fit into the Red Hat ecosystem, and to tap into the trust that developers have when they think about Red Hat and what a Red Hat product means for them: it’ll be reliable; it’ll have a published lifecycle; it’s built from source; and if you submit a bug, we’ll fix it (and give the fix to the community). This change is no different.

Red Hat CodeReady Studio is the latest evolution of Red Hat Developer Studio, which itself was an evolution of JBoss Developer Studio. We’re proud to include our distribution of Eclipse IDE in the expanding CodeReady portfolio. Based on the latest Eclipse 4.11, with the latest additions of JBoss Tools and end-to-end testing that ensures everything works as expected, developers can count on the same great experience they’ve grown used to. With tools for working with Fuse and other middleware products and connectors for Red Hat OpenShift that enable super-fast, container-native “inner loop” development cycles, CodeReady Studio is absolutely one of the best desktop IDEs an enterprise JavaTM developer can use.

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Rust All Hands 2019: Array iterators, Rayon, and more

Rust All Hands 2019: Array iterators, Rayon, and more

A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of attending the second annual Rust All Hands meeting, hosted by Mozilla at their Berlin office. The attendees were a mix of volunteers and corporate employees covering the full range of Rust development, including the compiler, language, libraries, docs, tools, operations, and community. Although I’m sure there will be an official summary of the meeting (like last year’s), in this article, I’ll cover a few things I was directly involved in. First, I’ll look at a feature many developers have wanted for a long time…

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Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

“The question of whether a computer can think is no more interesting than the question of whether a submarine can swim.” (Edsger W. Dijkstra)

Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

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