Developer Tools

Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

“The question of whether a computer can think is no more interesting than the question of whether a submarine can swim.” (Edsger W. Dijkstra)

Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

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How to install GCC 8 and Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

How to install GCC 8 and Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

There has been a lot of work to improve C/C++ compilers in recent years. A number of articles have been posted by Red Hat engineers working on the compilers themselves covering usability improvements, features to detect possible bugs, and security issues in your code.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta ships with GCC 8 as the default compiler. This article shows you how to install GCC 8 as well as Clang/LLVM 6 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. You’ll be able to use the same updated (and supported) compilers from Red Hat on both RHEL 7 and 8.

If you want your default gcc to always be GCC 8, or you want clang to always be in your path, this article shows how to permanently enable a software collection by adding it to the profile (dot files) for your user account. A number of common questions about software collections are also answered.

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Podman and Buildah for Docker users

Podman and Buildah for Docker users

I was asked recently on Twitter to better explain Podman and Buildah for someone familiar with Docker.  Though there are many blogs and tutorials out there, which I will list later, we in the community have not centralized an explanation of how Docker users move from Docker to Podman and Buildah.  Also what role does Buildah play? Is Podman deficient in some way that we need both Podman and Buildah to replace Docker?

This article answers those questions and shows how to migrate to Podman.

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Red Hat Single Sign-On: Give it a try for no cost!

Red Hat Single Sign-On: Give it a try for no cost!

In a software world where each day is more hostile than the previous one, security matters and developers are coping with more and more non-functional requirements about security. The most common ones are the “OWASP Top 10”: the ten security risks that every developer should know. There are many more security risks you should care about, but those ten risks are the ones having the most impact on the security of your software. Among them are authentication and access control.

The good news is that authentication and access control are now commodities in the open source world, thanks to Red Hat Single Sign-On Red Hat Single Sign-On is an access management tool that takes care of the details of most authentication protocols such as SAML, OAuth, and OpenID Connect; user consent with UMA; and even access control. It is easy to use, is very well-documented, and has a very active community: Keycloak.

This article describes how to download and install Red Hat Single Sign-On for no cost.

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Annocheck: Examining the contents of binary files

Annocheck: Examining the contents of binary files

The Annobin plugin for GCC stores extra information inside binary files as they are compiled.  Examining this information used to be performed by a set of shell scripts, but that has now changed and a new program—annocheck—has been written to do the job.  The advantage of the program is that it is faster and more flexible than the scripts, and it does not rely upon other utilities to actually peer inside the binaries.

This article is about the annocheck program: how to use it, how it works, and how to extend it. The program’s main purpose is to examine how a binary was built and to check that it has all of the appropriate security hardening features enabled. But that is not its only use.  It also has several other modes that perform different kinds of examination of binary files.

Another feature of annocheck is that it was designed to be easily extensible. It provides a framework for dissecting binary files and a set of utilities to help with this examination. It also knows how to handle archives, RPMs, and directories, presenting the contents of these to each tool as a series of ordinary files. Thus, tools need only worry about the specific tasks they want to carry out.

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Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2

Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2

This is the second half of my series covering how to use Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces to develop a Java Enterprise Edition (now Jakarta EE) application using Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) in the cloud on Red Hat OpenShift/Kubernetes. In the first part, we saw how to:

  • Bring your own tools by extending Red Hat’s provided stacks
  • Register your own stack within Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces
  • Create your workspace using your stack and embedding your JEE project located on a Git repository

For this second part, we’ll start configuring the workspace by adding some helpful settings and commands for building and running a JBoss EAP project. We’ll then see how to use the local JBoss EAP instance for deploying and debugging our application. Finally, we’ll create a factory so that we’ll be able to share our work and propose an on-demand configured development environment for anyone that needs to collaborate on our project.

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Extending Eclipse Che 7 to use VS Code extensions

Extending Eclipse Che 7 to use VS Code extensions

Recently the Eclipse Che community has been working to make Eclipse Theia the default web IDE for Eclipse Che 7. We’ve added a plugin model to Eclipse Theia that is compatible with Visual Studio Code (VS Code) extensions. Che 7 users will eventually be able to take advantage of extensions that have been written for VS Code in their cloud-based developer workspaces. It’s worth pointing out the popularity of VS Code extensions. Red Hat has contributed extensions covering Java, XML, YAML, OpenShift, and dependency analytics. The Java extension provided by Red Hat has been downloaded over 10 million times!

If you aren’t familiar with Eclipse Theia, Che 6 and earlier used a GWT-based IDE. While it is possible to develop and use plugins in that environment, it is cumbersome. Coming from tools like VS Code, developers expect to be able to customize and extend their workspaces at runtime. Eclipse Theia is an extensible open-source framework to develop multi-language IDEs using state-of-the-art web technologies. Moving to Theia as the default IDE for Che 7 provides a foundation to enrich the developer workspaces in Che. See the series of articles by Stevan LeMeur for more information about what’s coming in Che 7.

This article explains why we decided to add the new plugin model to Eclipse Theia and the benefits for Eclipse Che 7 developer workspaces. I also cover how the new plugin model differs from the existing Theia extension model.

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Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1

Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1

It has been just one month since the announcement of the release of Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 1.0.0 Beta. Because the cloud/browser-based IDE may be full of promises, developers are usually suspicious, considering them as toys for occasional coders but not suitable for software craftsmen. But you’ll quickly see that Red Hat’s offering can be a good companion for building tailor-made environments.

The goal of this two-part series is to give a walk-through of using Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces to develop a Java EE (now Jakarta EE) application using Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). I’ll give you details on how to bring your own tools, configure your workspace with helpful commands for JBoss EAP, and share everything so you can easily onboard new developers.

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Using Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to see the impact of migrating to OpenJDK

Using Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to see the impact of migrating to OpenJDK

Migrating from one software solution to another is a reality that all good software developers need to plan for. Having a plan helps to drive innovation at a continuous pace, whether you are developing software for in-house use or you are acquiring software from a vendor. In either case, never anticipating or planning for migration endangers the entire innovation value proposition. And in today’s ever-changing world of software, everyone who wants to benefit from the success of the cloud has to ensure that cloud innovation is continuous. Therefore, maintaining a stack that is changing along with technological advancements is a necessity.

In this article, we will take a look at the impact of moving to OpenJDK and the results will aid in drawing further conclusions and in planning. It’s quite common to be using a proprietary version of JDK, and this article addresses how to use Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to analyze your codebase to understand the impact of migrating to OpenJDK.

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