Develop and Deploy on OpenShift Online Starter using Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio

The OpenShift Online Starter platform is available for free: visit https://manage.openshift.com/. It is based on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.7. This offering allows you to play with OpenShift Container Platform and deploy artifacts. The purpose of the article is to describe how to use Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio or JBoss Tools together with this online platform.

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Debug your OpenShift Java application with Microsoft VSCode and Red Hat CDK

Recently, there has been a lot of buzz about two seemingly different products: Red Hat OpenShift and Microsoft Visual Studio Code (VSCode). Thanks to the help of Red Hat, the Java language is now supported inside of VSCode development environment. As Java is a first class citizen in Red Hat OpenShift, we will see how it is possible to debug your Java code running inside containers on OpenShift (thanks to Red Hat Container Development Kit) from within the VSCode IDE running on your desktop.

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What are BPF Maps and how are they used in stapbpf

Compared to SystemTap’s default backend, one of stapbpf’s most distinguishing features is the absence of a kernel module runtime. The BPF machinery inside the kernel instead mostly handles its runtime. Therefore it would be very helpful if BPF provided us with a way for states to be maintained across multiple invocations of BPF programs and for userspace programs to be able to communicate with BPF programs. This is accomplished by BPF maps. In this blog post, I will introduce BPF maps and explain their role in stapbpf’s implementation.

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Fall 2017 GNU Toolchain Update

The GNU Toolchain is a collection of programming tools produced by the GNU Project. The tools are often packaged together due to their common use for developing software applications, operating systems, and low-level software for embedded systems.

This blog is part of a regular series covering the latest changes and improvements in the components that make up this Toolchain. Apart from the announcement of new releases, however, the features described here are at the bleeding edge of software development in the tools. This does mean that it may be a while before they make it into production releases, and they might not be fully functional yet. But anyone who is interested in experimenting with them can build their own copy of the Toolchain and then try them out.

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