jboss

Announcing Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit 4.1.0: Now with technical reports

[In case you aren’t following the Red Hat JBoss Middleware blog, we are reposting this article on developers.redhat.com.]

Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit (RHAMT) 4.1.0 has been released, and with it a new feature that I’d like to highlight in this article—Technology Reports.

If you’re not familiar with RHAMT, check out my previous article that introduces RHAMT and describes how you can use it to help with migration existing applications to a modern application platform by analyzing your code base.

Technology reports

This new feature in RHAMT provides an aggregate listing of the technologies used, grouped by function, for the analyzed applications. It shows how the technologies are distributed. After analysis has been performed, using this report hundreds of applications can be quickly compared. In addition, the size, number of libraries, and story point totals of each application are displayed, allowing you to quickly determine each application’s type from a single report, for example:

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How to migrate your SOAP web service to REST with Camel

SOAP-based services are plentiful in many enterprise solutions and are slowly being replaced by RESTful services to simplify their use. There is a new wizard to help you make the transition with Apache Camel’s Rest DSL added in the latest version of Red Hat Fuse Tooling. This article shows how to use the new wizard to transition from older SOAP-based services to more modern REST-based services.

If you aren’t familiar, Red Hat Fuse is an integration platform based on Camel and a number of other projects. The updating Fuse Tooling is available in Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0.0, the desktop IDE that is based on Eclipse 4.8 Photon. You can also get the new wizard by adding JBoss Tools 4.6 to your existing Eclipse 4.8 Photon installation by downloading it directly, or installing via the Eclipse Marketplace.

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Red Hat Developer

Announcing updated Red Hat Developer Studio and Container Development Kit

I’m extremely pleased to announce the release of Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) 3.5 and Red Hat Developer Studio 12. Whether you are developing traditional or cloud-based applications and microservices, you can run these tools on your Windows, macOS, or Red Hat Enterprise Linux laptop to streamline development:

  • Red Hat Container Development Kit provides a pre-built container development environment to help you develop container-based applications quickly using Red Hat OpenShift and Kubernetes.
  • Red Hat Developer Studio (previously named JBoss Developer Studio) provides a desktop IDE with superior support for your entire development lifecycle. It includes a broad set of tooling capabilities and support for multiple programming models and frameworks. Developer Studio provides broad support for working with Red Hat products and technologies including middleware, business automation, and integration, notably Camel and Red Hat Fuse. Developer Studio is based on Eclipse 4.8 (Photon).

A number of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) development tools have been updated. These include Rust 1.26.1, Go 1.10.2, Cargo 1.26, and Eclipse 4.8 (Photon).

Our goals are to improve usability of our tools for developers, while adding new features that matter most for users of Red Hat platforms and technologies.

Overview of new features:

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Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.6.0.Final for Eclipse Photon

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.6.0 for Eclipse Photon, are now available. You can download a bundled installer, Developer Studio, which installs Eclipse 4.8 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.8 (Photon) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package. This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java related improvements including full Java 10 support.

Developer Studio / JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container / cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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EDI Transformations with Fuse Ignite and Trace Transformer

As part of Red Hat JBoss Fuse 7, Red Hat introduces a new Integration Platform as a Service (iPaaS) called Fuse Ignite. Gartner uses the term citizen integrators to describe the iPaaS target market: folks who aren’t regularly concerned with integration. In my opinion, this market includes Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) analysts who focus on business rules and validations, rather than worrying about lines of code or Apache Camel routes. Therefore, Fuse Ignite introduces a mechanism to separate concerns, allowing EDI analysts to focus on their business mappings and transformations. On the other hand, developers can focus on low-level integration with systems and on writing code. Fuse Ignite offers a platform on which both citizen integrators and developers can coexist, collaborate, and contribute to an end-to-end integration.

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Eclipse Che 6.6 Release Notes

[This article is cross-posted from the Eclipse Che Blog.]

Eclipse Che 6.6 Release Notes

Eclipse Che 6.6 is here! Since the release of Che 6.0, the community has added a number of new capabilities:

  • Kubernetes support: Run Che on Kubernetes and deploy it using Helm.
  • Hot server updates: Upgrade Che with zero downtime.
  • C/C++ support: ClangD Language Server was added.
  • Camel LS support: Apache Camel Language Server Protocol (LSP) support was added.
  • <strong”>Eclipse Java Development Tools (JDT) Language Server (LS): Extended LS capabilities were added for Eclipse Che.
  • Faster workspace loading: Images are pulled in parallel with the new UI.

Quick Start

Che is a cloud IDE and containerized workspace server. You can get started with Che by using the following links:

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jboss

An Introduction to Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit

[In case you aren’t following the Red Hat JBoss Middleware blog, we are reposting An Introduction to Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit on developers.redhat.com.]

Application migration and modernization can be a daunting task. Not only do you have to update legacy applications with newer libraries and APIs, but often you must also address new frameworks, infrastructures, and architectures all while simultaneously keeping resources dedicated to new features and versions.

Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit (RHAMT), formerly known as Windup, provides a set of utilities for easing this process. Applications can be analyzed through a command-line interface (CLI), through a web-based interface, or directly inside Eclipse, allowing immediate modification of the source code.

These utilities allow you to quickly gain insights into thousands of your applications simultaneously. They identify migration challenges and code or dependencies shared between applications, and they accelerate making the necessary code changes to have your applications run in the latest middleware platforms.

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Detecting String Truncation with GCC 8

Continuing in the effort to detect common programming errors, the just-released GCC 8 contains a number of new warnings as well as enhancements to existing checkers to help find non-obvious bugs in C and C++ code. This article focuses on those that deal with inadvertent string truncation and discusses some of the approaches for avoiding the underlying problems. If you haven’t read it, you might also want to read David Malcolm’s article Usability improvements in GCC 8.

Why Is String Truncation a Problem?

It is well-known why buffer overflow is dangerous: writing past the end of an object can overwrite data in adjacent storage, resulting in data corruption. In the most benign cases, the corruption can simply lead to incorrect behavior of the program. If the adjacent data is an address in the executable text segment, the corruption may be exploitable to gain control of the affected process, which can lead to a security vulnerability. (See CWE-119 for more on buffer overflow.)

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A Red Hat Summit sign on the streets of San Francisco

Red Hat Summit: An introduction to OpenShift.io

Red Hat OpenShift.io is an innovative online service for development teams. Installing and configuring IDEs, libraries, and various tools is a major time sink. OpenShift.io is a cloud-native set of zero-install tools for editing and debugging code, agile planning, and managing CI/CD pipelines. It also features package analytics (an unbelievably cool feature we’ll discuss more in a minute), and has various quick starts for common frameworks. Because everyone on the team uses the exact same tools, “It works on my machine” becomes a thing of the past.

Product Manager Todd Mancini started the session with a brief overview of the product. There’s so much more here than just the ability to develop code online. Today’s best practices include complex deployment pipelines. With OpenShift.io, you get a Maven repository and a Jenkins pipeline automatically. You can select from several pipeline templates. If you need an approval stage, for example, that’s built in to the product. In short, all the tools you need to create a virtuous circle of analyze, plan, and create are here, with no installation or configuration needed.

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From Localhost to the Cloud: Helping Organizations Develop Applications in a Hybrid World

For many developers, desktop tools are where they spend most of their time and feel most comfortable. We also recognize that developers are looking for new ways to build applications and new tools that are designed for these technologies. Developers are now using the cloud to host and manage their developer environment, and we see the tools that developers use moving to the cloud as well.

In the past year, we have taken steps to broaden our portfolio of developer tools. We acquired Codenvy to provide unique container-native offerings for our users, and we have been building Red Hat OpenShift.io, our SaaS offering for cloud-native development.

Today, we are announcing two more leaps toward a container- and cloud-native future:

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