Developer Tools

Using Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to see the impact of migrating to OpenJDK

Using Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to see the impact of migrating to OpenJDK

Migrating from one software solution to another is a reality that all good software developers need to plan for. Having a plan helps to drive innovation at a continuous pace, whether you are developing software for in-house use or you are acquiring software from a vendor. In either case, never anticipating or planning for migration endangers the entire innovation value proposition. And in today’s ever-changing world of software, everyone who wants to benefit from the success of the cloud has to ensure that cloud innovation is continuous. Therefore, maintaining a stack that is changing along with technological advancements is a necessity.

In this article, we will take a look at the impact of moving to OpenJDK and the results will aid in drawing further conclusions and in planning. It’s quite common to be using a proprietary version of JDK, and this article addresses how to use Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to analyze your codebase to understand the impact of migrating to OpenJDK.

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Eclipse Che 7 is Coming and It’s Really Hot (4/4)

Eclipse Che 7 is Coming and It’s Really Hot (4/4)

Eclipse Che 7 is an enterprise-grade IDE that is designed to solve many of the challenges faced by enterprise development teams. In my previous articles, I covered the main focus areas for Eclipse Che 7, the new plugin model, and kube-native developer workspaces. This article explains security and management of Eclipse Che 7 in enterprise deployment scenarios as well as release timing.

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Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.7 now available

Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.7 now available

We are pleased to announce the availability of the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) 3.7. CDK 3.7 is based on Minishift v1.27.0, a command-line tool to quickly provision an OpenShift and Kubernetes cluster on your local machine for developing cloud- and container-based applications. The CDK also includes OpenShift Container Platform v3.11.14. You can use the CDK on Windows, macOS, or Linux.

Here’s a summary of the new features in CDK 3.7:

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Announcing .NET Core 2.2 for Red Hat Platforms

Announcing .NET Core 2.2 for Red Hat Platforms

We are very excited to announce the general availability of .NET Core 2.2 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenShift platforms! This general availability is in lock-step with Microsoft’s release yesterday.

.NET Core is the open-source, cross-platform .NET platform for building microservices. .NET Core is designed to provide the best performance at scale for applications that use microservices and containers. Libraries can be shared with other .NET platforms, such as .NET Framework (Windows) and Xamarin (mobile applications). With .NET Core you have the flexibility of building and deploying applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux or in containers. Your container-based applications and microservices can easily be deployed to your choice of public or private clouds using Red Hat OpenShift. All of the features of OpenShift and Kubernetes for cloud deployments are available to you.

.NET Core 2.2 continues to broaden its support and tools for application development in an open source environment. The latest version of .NET Core includes the following improvements:

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XML Language Server and the VSCode Extension

XML Language Server and the VSCode Extension

 

For my first and ongoing project as an intern at Red Hat, I’ve been working alongside Angelo Zerr and Fred Bricon to develop an implementation of the Language Server Protocol (LSP) for XML. Through the XML language server,  developer tools like VSCode and Eclipse receive XML syntax highlighting and checking, code completion, document folding, etc.  At the moment we appear to have the most feature rich XML language server implementation, including our Schema-based support which is an essential XML feature that we are most proud of. Combined, all these features make it much easier for developers to work on any type of project involving XML, from the comfort of their favorite editor or IDE.

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Announcing the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code: Public Preview

Announcing the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code: Public Preview

We are extremely pleased to announce that the preview release of the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code is now available. You can download the OpenShift Connector extension from the marketplace or install it directly from the extension gallery in Visual Studio Code.

This article provides describes the features and benefits of the extension and provides installation details. It also provides a demo of how using the extension improves the end-to-end experience of developing and deploying Spring Boot applications to local OpenShift cluster.

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Support Lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust

Support Lifecycle for Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust

On the heels of our recently announcement, General Availability of Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29, I want to share how we’ll be supporting them going forward. Previously, these packages had been in “Technology Preview” status, which means that they were provided for “you to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process”, and were “not fully supported under Red Hat Subscription Level Agreements, may not be functionally complete, and are not intended for production use”.

So now that we’ve promoted them to fully supported status, what does that mean? In the simplest terms, General Availability (GA) means that these packages have officially entered the “Full Support Phase” of their lifecycle:

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