Design Patterns

Designing an event-driven process at scale: Part 3

Designing an event-driven process at scale: Part 3

In the first article in this series, Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example, Part 1, you found the business use case and data model for a concrete example from the health management industry. You then began implementing the example in jBPM (an open source business automation suite) by creating the Trigger process.

In the second article, you implemented the Task subprocess and, among other things, you also configured the call parameters for the Reminder and Escalation subprocesses within the Task subprocess. Now you will implement these subprocesses.

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Designing an event-driven process at scale: Part 2

Designing an event-driven process at scale: Part 2

In the first article in this series, Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example, Part 1, we began by defining the business use case and data model for a concrete example from the health management industry. We then began implementing the example in jBPM (an open source business automation suite) by creating our trigger process.

Now, in the second article in this series, we will focus on creating the Task subprocess and its many components. In our case, these are:

  • The Expired? gate
  • The Suppressed? gate
  • The human task
  • The Reminder subprocess
  • The “What type of close?” gate
  • The Hard Close embedded subprocess
  • The Escalation subprocess

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Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example, Part 1

Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example, Part 1

The concept of a business process (BP), or workflow (WF), and the discipline and practice of business process management (BPM) have been around since the early 90s. Since then, WF/BPM tools have evolved considerably. More recently, a convergence of different tools has taken place, adding decision management (DM) and case management (CM) to the mix. The ascendance of data science, machine learning, and artificial intelligence in the last few years has further complicated the picture. The mature field of BPM has been subsumed into the hyped pseudo-novelties of digital business automation, digital reinvention, digital everything, etc., with the addition of “low code” and robotic process automation (RPA).

A common requirement of business applications today is to be event-driven; that is, specific events should trigger a workflow or decision in real-time. This requirement leads to a fundamental problem. In realistic situations, there are many different types of events, each one requiring specific handling. An event-driven business application may have hundreds of qualitatively different workflows or processes. As new types of events arise in today’s ever-changing business conditions, new processes have to be designed and deployed as quickly as possible.

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Patterns for distributed transactions within a microservices architecture

Patterns for distributed transactions within a microservices architecture

Red Hat Application Development Center of Excellence Logo

Microservices architecture (MSA) has become very popular.. However, one common problem is how to manage distributed transactions across multiple microservices. This post is going to share my experience from past projects and explain the problem and possible patterns that could solve it.

What is a distributed transaction?

When a microservice architecture decomposes a monolithic system into self-encapsulated services, it can break transactions. This means a local transaction in the monolithic system is now distributed into multiple services that will be called in a sequence.

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Red Hat Summit: An Eventful Tour from Enterprise Integration to Serverless

Red Hat Summit: An Eventful Tour from Enterprise Integration to Serverless

Red Hat Senior Architects Marius Bogoevici and Christian Posta recently presented an overview of event-driven architecture, taking the audience from the basics of enterprise integration to microservices and serverless computing. Standing in front of a packed room at Red Hat Summit, their talk addressed four basic points:

  1. Event-driven architectures have been around for a while. What are they, why are they powerful, and why are back en vogue?
  2. Messaging is often used as a backbone for event-based distributed systems. What options do we have for cloud-native event-driven architectures?
  3. Integration is necessary for any organization. How do streaming, cloud-native architectures, and microservices fit in?
  4. Are Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS) the next utopian architecture? Where do functions fit in a world of microservices?

The entire session was done with three enterprise concerns in mind. First is the divide between agile systems and purpose-built systems. While the purpose-built system is optimized for a small set of use cases, it is very difficult to change if new use cases arise or the old use cases become irrelevant. We have to be agile to adapt to a constantly changing environment. Another concern is resource utilization. We want to eliminate waste and get the most out of our systems and resources, although the cloud in general and containers in particular make more distributed architectures practical. Finally, Christian made the observation that we cannot build complex systems from complex parts. The components we develop must be as simple and understandable as possible.

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The NEW API Pattern

Distributed Architectures are a lot like neural networks; all services that talk to each other need to share the I/O in and in a way that they can synchronize that information on the fly. The way the brain does is that each neuron that communicates with another has the other neuron fire back a neurotransmitter to synchronize and improve that communication in the future thus creating a pattern.

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New Java EE Book – Modern Java EE Design Patterns

New Java EE Book – Modern Java EE Design Patterns

Today is a very special day for me. I am pleased to announce that my thoughts around Enterprise Java development made it into a report and has been published by O’Reilly. The “Modern Java EE Design Patterns” mini-book is available for download as of today here. I am covering a lot of ground in this, beginning from the overall Enterprise challenges and changes over the last couple of years all the way down to microservices pattern.  With plenty of further reading about relevant technologies and team considerations, you will find resources, ideas, and best practices. And I am very proud to include a foreword by Mark Little (VP of Red Hat Engineering).

Below I’ve included the full abstract for the mini-book but in a few quick highlights, you will learn:

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