Using Red Hat Data Grid to power a multi-cloud real-time game

The scavenger hunt game developed for the audience to play during the Red Hat Summit 2018 demo used Red Hat Data Grid as storage for everything except the pictures taken by the participants. Data was stored across three different cloud environments using cross-site replication. In this blog post, we will look at how data was flowing through Data Grid and explain the Data Grid features powering different aspects of the game’s functionality.

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Red Hat Data Grid on Three Clouds (the details behind the demo)

If you saw or heard about the multi-cloud demo at Red Hat Summit 2018, this article details how we ran Red Hat Data Grid in active-active-active mode across three cloud providers. This set up enabled us to show a fail over between cloud providers in real time with no loss of data. In addition to Red Hat Data Grid, we used Vert.x (reactive programming), OpenWhisk (serverless), and Red Hat Gluster Storage (software-defined storage.)

This year’s Red Hat Summit was quite an adventure for all of us. A trip to San Francisco is probably on the bucket list of IT geeks from all over the world. Also, we were able to meet many other Red Hatters, who work remotely for Red Hat as we do.  However, the best part was that we had something important to say: “we believe in the hybrid/multi cloud” and we got to prove that live on stage.

Photo credit: Bolesław Dawidowicz

 

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Red Hat Summit 2018 Burr Sutter Demo – Multi-cloud

One of the highlights of Red Hat Summit 2018 was another live, on-stage demo given by Burr Sutter (@burrsutter) and a team of developers. The demo was particularly engaging because the audience participated using a mobile game on their phones that communicated with a multi-cloud backend developed by Burr’s team. The objective of the demo was to show off the technologies, and also show how complex development and deployment challenges can be solved with a modern approach.

Audience members were challenged to take pictures of requested objects as part of the game. Points were assigned for how well the photo represented the request. The photos were automatically uploaded to the cloud where a TensorFlow image recognition service running on OpenShift scored each photo using machine learning. (The video is available after the break.)

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AMQ Replication HA Policy

Demonstrating Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7 HA Replication Failover

A few weeks ago, the newest version of Red Hat JBoss AMQ was released. AMQ 7 is the result of Red Hat’s efforts on creating a unified messaging platform for its middleware offerings. One of the most interesting features of this new version is the new backing strategy for failovering when configured in high availability. This feature allows clients connections to migrate from one server to another in the event of server failure so client applications can continue to operate.

AMQ 6.x already had an option to configure failover using a shared store, usually backed up by a shared filesystem or a JDBC connection to a database. However, that option involved the use of external infrastructure add-on in hardware and software, representing an increase in overall deployment costs.

In AMQ 7, support for network-based replication was added. When using replication, the live and the backup servers do not share the same data directories; all data synchronization is done over the network. Therefore, all (persistent) data received by the live server will be duplicated to the backup.

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Upgrading to Vaadin Framework 8 (Part 2 of 2)

In the previous part of this blog, I talked about the most important steps to get your project to compile with the latest Framework version.

The migration has been done through the first three steps mentioned here, and in this post, I will go over the least complicated steps of migration. Steps 4 and 5 cover the modernization of your project with the latest Framework 8 features. If you are in a hurry, you can do this later on as well, and use the new APIs only for new Vaadin code.

  1. Upgrade dependencies in the POM file
  2. Run Maven goal vaadin:upgrade8
  3. Upgrade Add-ons
  4. Upgrade non-data components
  5. Upgrade data components
  6. Back to the future

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