data security

Five layers of security for Red Hat Data Grid on OpenShift

Five layers of security for Red Hat Data Grid on OpenShift

Red Hat Data Grid is an in-memory, distributed, NoSQL datastore solution. With it, your applications can access, process, and analyze data at in-memory speed to deliver a superior user experience. In-memory Data Grid has a variety of use cases in today’s environment, such as fast data access for low-latency apps, storing objects (NoSQL) in a datastore, achieving linear scalability with data distribution/partitioning, and data high-availability across geographies, among many others. With containers getting more attention, the need to have Data Grid running on a container platform like OpenShift is clear, and we are seeing more and more customers aligning their architecture with a datastore running natively on a container platform.

In this article, I will talk about multiple layers of security available while deploying Data Grid on OpenShift. The layers of security offer a combination of security measures provided by Data Grid as well as by OpenShift/Kubernetes.

Continue reading “Five layers of security for Red Hat Data Grid on OpenShift”

Share
Wearable Tech: A Developer’s Security Nightmare

Wearable Tech: A Developer’s Security Nightmare

Web developers and IT professionals are the foundations of any quality business’ data security.

However, with technology constantly changing and evolving as well as becoming more consumer-friendly, this data’s vulnerability only increases and it can often be hard to even notice how this new technology can actually affect your company until it occurs. Despite this, ignorance to modern hacking techniques does not refute their inability to transform even the smallest of devices into a weapon with which to infect or intrude upon data and the effects of this on a company can mean massive destruction in the infrastructure and beyond.

One of the newest data security threats posed to the IoT, in particular, is the rise of the wearable technology industry. With companies like FitBit and Google developing glasses, fitness trackers, and watches that make everyday life a little bit easier, it may seem as if the wearable tech industry is nothing more than a fun and exciting way to incorporate technology into the average consumer’s life, however, this is not entirely the case.

Continue reading “Wearable Tech: A Developer’s Security Nightmare”

Share