Continuous Development with Automated Testing

Automated testing is one of the hardest, but also the most important thing to get right when doing Continuous Delivery or DevOps. Recently Aslak Knutsen and I hosted a webinar with the title “Continuous Development with Automated Testing”. The webinar had quite a few viewers (and maybe that was one of the reasons that the demo in the webinar didn’t exactly go as planned.)

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Containers in the enterprise – Are you ready for this?

So here’s are deal: We’ve created what we’re calling “PaaS-Containers” in our IT production environment. It consists of core technologies like RHEL Atomic Host, Kubernetes, and Docker along with supporting CI/CD components like Jenkins together as part of an offering that supports the end-to-end automated deployments of applications from a code-commit event through automated testing and roll-out through multiple environments (dev, QA, stage, prod). Oh, did I mention that it’s also integrated with our enterprise logging and monitoring as well as our change management process and tooling so that we have a complete audit trail?

Everyone wants to jump on the bandwagon – they see the benefits of rapid deployment, atomicity, enabling business capabilities faster through technology. But as we learned in the 90-day initiative to get it stood up and an existing application deployed on it, all applications aren’t ready for containers and some may never be based on their current architecture.

Here’s what we think about the deployment options in an enterprise context that allows us to enable innovation while managing enterprise risk…

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Incepting DevOps at Red Hat

A few short months ago, I was managing an operations team at another firm. There had been a sea change in executive leadership over the summer, and the DevOps transformation that I’d helped to kick off was quickly being unraveled by the sorts of executive shenanigans that can ensue when a C level departs and leaves an opening. I was open minded to a change in scenery and got the call of a lifetime from a Red Hat recruiter.

You see, I’ve been involved in the Linux community since around 1998. I helped grow the Triangle Linux Users Group in its early years, and served a term on the steering committee as Vice Chair. When the community was looking for an enterprise class Linux distribution without the cost of a subscription model, I joined the cAosity project (now gone) and helped deliver CentOS to the Linux community. Open Source was in my DNA, and living in the Raleigh area the success of Red Hat was always right there for me to admire. “Someday I’d like to work there,” I often thought to myself.

This DevOps thing has gotten a lot of traction with me. I’ve been a volunteer co-organizer at Triangle DevOps, and have even given a few public talks on the subject, too.

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