codeready

Develop Eclipse MicroProfile applications on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform XP 2.0

Develop Eclipse MicroProfile applications on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform XP 2.0

This article shows you how to install Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) XP 2.0.0 GA with support for Eclipse MicroProfile. Once you’ve enabled Eclipse MicroProfile, you will be able to use its quickstart examples to start developing your own MicroProfile applications with Red Hat CodeReady Studio. In this demonstration, you’ll learn two ways to build and run the MicroProfile Config quickstart application.

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Support for IBM Power Systems and more with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Support for IBM Power Systems and more with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5 is now available. This article introduces support for IBM Power Systems and the new single-host mode in CodeReady Workspaces 2.5. We also briefly discuss support for Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 and language updates in this release.

Note: CodeReady Workspaces 2.5 is available on Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 and Red Hat OpenShift 4.5 and higher.

About CodeReady Workspaces

CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) is based on Eclipse Che, an open source project. CodeReady Workspaces significantly improves developer productivity with near-instant onboarding and consistent, production-like development environments. Developers can use CodeReady Workspaces for cloud-native development on Red Hat OpenShift and other types of development.

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Using IntelliJ Community Edition in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Using IntelliJ Community Edition in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.5

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) provides a default browser-based IDE to be used with developer workspaces. However, the architecture is flexible for using other IDEs such as Jupyter Notebooks and Eclipse Dirigible. In this article, you will learn how to create a custom workspace using the community edition of IntelliJ IDEA.

Note: You can also apply the instructions in this article to create a free, self-service Eclipse Che workspace hosted at che.openshift.io.

Creating a custom workspace in CodeReady Workspaces

We will start with the procedure for creating a custom workspace in a connected CodeReady Workspaces environment. See the next section for instructions to set up a custom workspace in an air-gapped environment.

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Devfiles and Kubernetes cluster support in OpenShift Connector 0.2.0 extension for VS Code

Devfiles and Kubernetes cluster support in OpenShift Connector 0.2.0 extension for VS Code

We are pleased to announce that the new release of the OpenShift Connector extension for Visual Studio Code (VS Code) is now available. The 0.2.0 release offers new features for rapidly developing and deploying code on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift clusters. OpenShift Connector now supports component deployment using devfiles, leveraging odo 2.0 command-line interface under the hood.

With this release, the extension now supports connecting to vanilla Kubernetes clusters and includes a new option for creating OpenShift 4 clusters locally via Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC). In this article, we introduce these new features and present the workflow for using CodeReady Containers with OpenShift Connector 0.2.0.

Install OpenShift Connector 0.2.0

  1. Install the OpenShift Connector plug-in directly from the Visual Studio Code Marketplace.
  2. Alternatively, select the Extensions view in VS Code by clicking on its square icon in the left-side taskbar. Search for the OpenShift Connector plug-in and click Install.
  3. Once you have installed the extension, the OpenShift icon will be added to the left-side activity bar and ready for use.

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New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.17 GA and JBoss Tools 4.17.0 Final for Eclipse 2020-09

New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.17 GA and JBoss Tools 4.17.0 Final for Eclipse 2020-09

JBoss Tools 4.17.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.17 for Eclipse 4.17 (2020-09) are now available. For this release, we focused on improving Quarkus and container-based development and fixing bugs. We also updated the Hibernate Tools runtime provider and Java Developer Tools (JDT) extensions, which are now compatible with Java 15. Additionally, we made many changes to platform views, dialogs, and toolbars in the user interface (UI).

Keep reading for an overview of what’s new in JBoss Tools 4.17.0 and CodeReady Studio 12.17 for Eclipse 4.17 (2020-09).

Installation

First, let’s look at how to install these updates. CodeReady Studio (previously Red Hat Developer Studio) comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Download the installer from the Red Hat CodeReady Studio product page and run it as follows:

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Kubernetes integration and more in odo 2.0

Kubernetes integration and more in odo 2.0

Odo is a developer-focused command-line interface (CLI) for OpenShift and Kubernetes. This article introduces highlights of the odo 2.0 release, which now integrates with Kubernetes. Additional highlights include the new default deployment method in odo 2.0, which uses devfiles for rapid, iterative development. We’ve also moved Operator deployment out of experimental mode, so you can easily deploy Operator-backed services from the odo command line.

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How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

Red Hat CodeReady Containers allows you to spin up a small Red Hat OpenShift cluster on your local PC, without the need for a server, a cloud, or a team of operations people. For developers who want to get started immediately with cloud-native development, containers, and Kubernetes (as well as OpenShift), it’s a simple and slick tool. It runs on macOS, Linux, and all versions of Windows 10.

Except for Windows 10 Enterprise.

Which I painfully learned.

Because I lazily didn’t pay attention to the documentation.

OK, so I’m the only developer who glosses over documentation. Fortunately for you, I struggled and managed to get CRC running on my Windows 10 Enterprise notebook computer, and this article explains what is involved to get it working. So, in a sense, you’re welcome that I’m lazy.

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How to install the CouchbaseDB Operator for Red Hat OpenShift on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

How to install the CouchbaseDB Operator for Red Hat OpenShift on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Red Hat Marketplace is an online store of sorts, where you can choose the software that you want to install and run on your Red Hat OpenShift cluster. The analogy is a phone app store, where you select an app, and it’s automagically installed on your phone. With Marketplace, you simply register your cluster(s), select the software that you want, and it is installed for you. It could not be easier.

In this article, I show you how to install Couchbase Server Enterprise Edition on an OpenShift cluster. In my case, the cluster is running on Fedora 32 using Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC). Couchbase Server Enterprise Edition is currently available as a free trial, and CRC is also available at zero cost. This setup offers a no-risk way to try containers, Kubernetes, OpenShift, and, in this case, Couchbase. This is definitely “developers playing around with the software”-level stuff.

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Migrate your Java apps to containers with Migration Toolkit for Applications 5.0

Migrate your Java apps to containers with Migration Toolkit for Applications 5.0

As a developer, you have probably experimented with Kubernetes. It’s also possible that you are already running several Java applications on a Kubernetes platform, maybe Red Hat OpenShift. These initial containerized applications were greenfield projects, where you enjoyed the benefits of a platform providing templated deployments, easy rollbacks, resource availability, security by default, and a manageable way to publish your services.

Now, you might be thinking, “How can I enjoy all of these benefits in my existing Java applications?” Most Java applications in production today are running on virtual machines (VMs), likely on an application platform that is not container friendly. So, how can you migrate them from the current platform to containers on Kubernetes?

It isn’t an easy task, but this is a problem that we have been working hard on for years. Red Hat’s Migration Toolkit for Applications (MTA) 5.0 is the latest resulting iteration: An assembly of tools that you can use to analyze existing applications and discover what is required to modernize them. Read on to learn MTA 5.0’s features and migration paths.

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