codeready

How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

How to run Red Hat CodeReady Containers on Windows 10 Enterprise

Red Hat CodeReady Containers allows you to spin up a small Red Hat OpenShift cluster on your local PC, with the need for a server, a cloud, or a team of operations people. For developers who want to get started immediately with cloud-native development, containers, and Kubernetes (as well as OpenShift), it’s a simple and slick tool. It runs on macOS, Linux, and all versions of Windows 10.

Except for Windows 10 Enterprise.

Which I painfully learned.

Because I lazily didn’t pay attention to the documentation.

OK, so I’m the only developer who glosses over documentation. Fortunately for you, I struggled and managed to get CRC running on my Windows 10 Enterprise notebook computer, and this article explains what is involved to get it working. So, in a sense, you’re welcome that I’m lazy.

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How to install the CouchbaseDB Operator for Red Hat OpenShift on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

How to install the CouchbaseDB Operator for Red Hat OpenShift on your laptop using Red Hat CodeReady Containers and Red Hat Marketplace

Red Hat Marketplace is an online store of sorts, where you can choose the software that you want to install and run on your Red Hat OpenShift cluster. The analogy is a phone app store, where you select an app, and it’s automagically installed on your phone. With Marketplace, you simply register your cluster(s), select the software that you want, and it is installed for you. It could not be easier.

In this article, I show you how to install Couchbase Server Enterprise Edition on an OpenShift cluster. In my case, the cluster is running on Fedora 32 using Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC). Couchbase Server Enterprise Edition is currently available as a free trial, and CRC is also available at zero cost. This setup offers a no-risk way to try containers, Kubernetes, OpenShift, and, in this case, Couchbase. This is definitely “developers playing around with the software”-level stuff.

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Migrate your Java apps to containers with Migration Toolkit for Applications 5.0

Migrate your Java apps to containers with Migration Toolkit for Applications 5.0

As a developer, you have probably experimented with Kubernetes. It’s also possible that you are already running several Java applications on a Kubernetes platform, maybe Red Hat OpenShift. These initial containerized applications were greenfield projects, where you enjoyed the benefits of a platform providing templated deployments, easy rollbacks, resource availability, security by default, and a manageable way to publish your services.

Now, you might be thinking, “How can I enjoy all of these benefits in my existing Java applications?” Most Java applications in production today are running on virtual machines (VMs), likely on an application platform that is not container friendly. So, how can you migrate them from the current platform to containers on Kubernetes?

It isn’t an easy task, but this is a problem that we have been working hard on for years. Red Hat’s Migration Toolkit for Applications (MTA) 5.0 is the latest resulting iteration: An assembly of tools that you can use to analyze existing applications and discover what is required to modernize them. Read on to learn MTA 5.0’s features and migration paths.

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OpenShift 4.5: Bringing developers joy with Kubernetes 1.18 and so much more

OpenShift 4.5: Bringing developers joy with Kubernetes 1.18 and so much more

Since the first Red Hat OpenShift release in 2015, Red Hat has put out numerous releases based on Kubernetes. Five years later, Kubernetes is celebrating its sixth birthday, and last month, we announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 4.5. In this article, I offer a high-level view of the latest OpenShift release and its technology and feature updates based on Kubernetes 1.18.

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New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.16.0.Final for Eclipse 2020-06

New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.16.0.Final for Eclipse 2020-06

JBoss Tools 4.16.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16 for Eclipse 4.16 (2020-06) are now available. For this release, we focused on improving Quarkus– and container-based development and fixing bugs. We also updated the Hibernate Tools runtime provider and Java Developer Tools (JDT) extensions, which are now compatible with Java 14. Additionally, we made many changes to platform views, dialogs, and toolbars in the user interface (UI).

This article is an overview of what’s new in JBoss Tools 4.16.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16 for Eclipse 4.16 (2020-06).

Installation

First, let’s look at how to install these updates. CodeReady Studio (previously Red Hat Developer Studio) comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Simply download the installer from the Red Hat CodeReady Studio product page and run it as follows:

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Developing at the edge: Best practices for edge computing

Developing at the edge: Best practices for edge computing

Edge computing continues to gain force as ever more companies increase their investments in edge, even if they’re only dipping their toes in with small-scale pilot deployments. Emerging use cases like Internet-of-Things (IoT), augmented reality, and virtual reality (AR/VR), robotics, and telecommunications-network functions are often cited as key drivers for companies moving computing to the edge. Traditional enterprises are also looking at edge computing to better support their remote offices, retail locations, manufacturing plants, and more. At the network edge, service providers can deploy an entirely new class of services to take advantage of their proximity to customers.

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Develop Eclipse MicroProfile applications on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Expansion Pack 1.0 with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces

Develop Eclipse MicroProfile applications on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Expansion Pack 1.0 with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces

This article builds on my previous tutorial, Enable Eclipse MicroProfile applications on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.3. To follow the examples, you must have Eclipse MicroProfile enabled in your Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Expansion Pack (JBoss EAP XP) 1.0.0.GA installation, via Red Hat CodeReady Studio. See the previous article for installation instructions.

In this article, we will use the installed MicroProfile-enabled image to set up a JBoss EAP XP quickstart project in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces (CRW). You can also apply what you learn from this article to develop your own applications using CodeReady Workspaces.

Note: For more examples, be sure to see the video demonstration at the end of the article.

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Develop and test a Quarkus client on Red Hat CodeReady Containers with Red Hat Data Grid 8.0

Develop and test a Quarkus client on Red Hat CodeReady Containers with Red Hat Data Grid 8.0

This article is about my experience installing Red Hat Data Grid (RHDG) on Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC) so that I could set up a local environment to develop and test a Quarkus Infinispan client. I started by installing CodeReady Containers and then installed Red Hat Data Grid. I am also on a learning path for Quarkus, so my last step was to integrate the Quarkus Infinispan client into my new development environment.

Initially, I tried connecting the Quarkus client to my locally running instance of Data Grid. Later, I decided I wanted to create an environment where I could test and debug Data Grid on Red Hat OpenShift 4. I tried installing Data Grid on OpenShift 4 in a shared environment, but maintaining that environment was challenging. Through trial-and-error, I found that it was better to install Red Hat Data Grid on CodeReady Containers and use that for my local development and testing environment.

In this quick tutorial, I guide you through setting up a local environment to develop and test a Quarkus client—in this case, Quarkus Infinispan. The process consists of three steps:

  1. Install and run CodeReady Containers.
  2. Install Data Grid on CodeReady Containers.
  3. Integrate the Quarkus Infinispan client into the new development environment.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift, Part 4: Openshift Pipelines

Modern web applications on OpenShift, Part 4: Openshift Pipelines

When I wrote part 3 of this series, Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — OpenShift as a development environment, I said that was the final part. However, there is new tech that fits in very nicely with deploying modern Web Applications to OpenShift, so part 4 is necessary. As a refresher, in the first article, we looked at how to deploy a modern web application using the fewest commands. In the second part, we took a deeper look into how the new source-to-image (S2I) web app builder works and how to use it as part of a chained build. In the third, we took a look at how to run your app’s “development workflow” on Red Hat OpenShift. This article talks about OpenShift Pipelines and how this tool can be used as an alternative to a chained build.

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