CodeReady Workspaces

Red Hat OpenShift 4 on your laptop: Introducing Red Hat CodeReady Containers

Red Hat OpenShift 4 on your laptop: Introducing Red Hat CodeReady Containers

We are pleased to announce that Red Hat CodeReady Containers is now available as a Developer Preview. CodeReady Containers brings a minimal, preconfigured OpenShift 4.1 or newer cluster to your local laptop or desktop computer for development and testing purposes. CodeReady Containers supports native hypervisors for Linux, macOS, and Windows 10. You can download CodeReady Containers from the CodeReady Containers product page on cloud.redhat.com.

CodeReady Containers is designed for local development and testing on an OpenShift 4 cluster. For running an OpenShift 3 cluster locally, see Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) or Minishift.

In this article, we’ll look at the features and benefits of CodeReady Containers, show a demo of how easy it is to create a local Red Hat OpenShift 4 cluster, and show how to deploy an application on top of it.

Continue reading “Red Hat OpenShift 4 on your laptop: Introducing Red Hat CodeReady Containers”

Share
How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Process automation tooling

How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Process automation tooling

The release of the latest Red Hat developer suite version 12 included a name change from Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio to Red Hat CodeReady Studio. The focus here is not on the Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces, a cloud and container development experience, but on the locally installed developers studio. Given that, you might have questions about how to get started with the various Red Hat integration, data, and process automation product toolsets that are not installed out of the box.

Continue reading How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Process automation tooling

Share
Announcing Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 1.2

Announcing Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 1.2

We are pleased to introduce Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces version 1.2, which provides a cloud developer workspace server and browser-based IDE built for teams and organizations. CodeReady Workspaces includes ready-to-use developer stacks for most of the popular programming languages, frameworks, and Red Hat technologies.

Release overview

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 1.2 introduces:

Continue reading “Announcing Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 1.2”

Share
How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Integration tooling

How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Integration tooling

The release of the latest Red Hat developer suite version 12 brings with it a name change from Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio to Red Hat CodeReady Studio. The focus here is not on the Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces, a cloud and container development experience, but on the locally installed developers studio.

The new release also brings with it the questions about how to get started with the various Red Hat integration, data, and process automation product toolsets that are not installed out of the box. This series of articles showcases how to install each set of tools and explains the products they are supporting. The hope is that an easy getting started experience will help you make informed decisions about the tooling that you might want to use on your next development project.

Continue reading “How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Integration tooling”

Share
How to edit and test application code in CodeReady Workspaces

How to edit and test application code in CodeReady Workspaces

In this CodeReady Workspaces video, learn how to create a new workspace using the code generated from the launcher, and how to make the application run locally. Also find out how to build and deploy an application locally within the workspace, how to edit and test the code, and how to commit code changes to a remote git repository. The steps described in this video are also available in the tutorial on GitHub.

Continue reading “How to edit and test application code in CodeReady Workspaces”

Share
Getting started with CodeReady Workspaces and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes launcher

Getting started with CodeReady Workspaces and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes launcher

Watch this video for an introduction to CodeReady Workspaces and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes, their functionality, and how they complement each other for cloud-native application development on OpenShift. This is the first part of a video series, and the subsequent videos will cover step-by-step instructions to use Launcher and CodeReady workspaces. To try hands-on labs, refer to the tutorial on GitHub.

Continue reading “Getting started with CodeReady Workspaces and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes launcher”

Share
An overview of Eclipse Che

An overview of Eclipse Che

This video is a brief overview of Eclipse Che presented by CodeReady Workspaces Product Manager Stévan Le Meur. The tour starts in a git repo that contains a link to a Che factory. Opening that factory loads the code from the git repo and sets up a complete development environment. From there, Stévan covers how to build, run, and debug the code within Che.

Continue reading An overview of Eclipse Che

Share
Creating a containerized Python/Flask development environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces

Creating a containerized Python/Flask development environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces provide developers with containerized development environments hosted on OpenShift/Kubernetes. DevOps teams can now use a hosted development environment that’s pre-built for their chosen stack and customized for their project.

CodeReady Workspaces can help you rapidly onboard developers for your project as everything they need to develop is running in a containerized workspace. In this post, we’re going to use CodeReady Workspaces to get up and running quickly with an existing open source project, Peak. Peak is a multi-container Kubernetes application for performance testing web services, and it allows you to create distributed performance tests using the Kubernetes Batch API for test orchestration. We’ll make some modifications to Peak’s Flask front end, a stateless web interface that interacts with a Falcon RESTful API to return data about performance tests. You won’t need the complete Peak application deployed, though if you like, you can find steps to deploy it to OpenShift here.

To follow along you’ll need a Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.11 environment. You can use the Red Hat Container Development Kit on your Windows, macOS, or Linux laptop or a hosted Red Hat OpenShift instance to do it on online.

Continue reading “Creating a containerized Python/Flask development environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces”

Share
Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2

Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2

This is the second half of my series covering how to use Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces to develop a Java Enterprise Edition (now Jakarta EE) application using Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) in the cloud on Red Hat OpenShift/Kubernetes. In the first part, we saw how to:

  • Bring your own tools by extending Red Hat’s provided stacks
  • Register your own stack within Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces
  • Create your workspace using your stack and embedding your JEE project located on a Git repository

For this second part, we’ll start configuring the workspace by adding some helpful settings and commands for building and running a JBoss EAP project. We’ll then see how to use the local JBoss EAP instance for deploying and debugging our application. Finally, we’ll create a factory so that we’ll be able to share our work and propose an on-demand configured development environment for anyone that needs to collaborate on our project.

Continue reading “Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2”

Share