CodeReady Workspaces

Add Java language support for Apache Camel K inside Eclipse Che

Add Java language support for Apache Camel K inside Eclipse Che

Apache Camel K should be as lightweight as possible. Therefore, the Camel K project provides standalone Java files that describe a Camel integration. The downside to this practice is that existing IDEs cannot provide complete support out of the box. A few months ago, I mentioned the Java language support for Apache Camel K that was discussed in Red Hat Visual Studio Code (VS Code) extension, and how it provides Java language support for Apache Camel K. In this article and demo, I show you how to do the same with Eclipse Che and che.openshift.io.

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Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Vulnerability analysis with Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics and Snyk Intel

Red Hat CodeReady Dependency Analytics is a hosted service on OpenShift that provides vulnerability and compliance analysis for your applications, directly from your IDE. It automatically analyzes your software composition and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing issues. The 0.1 release of CodeReady Dependency Analytics includes access to the Snyk Intel Vulnerability Database, which is a curated database of both unique and known open source software security advisories.

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Improved configuration and more in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.3

Improved configuration and more in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.3

Based on Eclipse Che, Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) is a Red Hat OpenShift-native developer environment that supports cloud-native development. CodeReady Workspaces 2.3 is now available. For this release, we focused on improving CRW’s configuration options, updating to the latest versions of IDE plugins, and adding new devfiles.

CodeReady Workspaces 2.3 is available on:

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Performance and usability enhancements in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.2

Performance and usability enhancements in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.2

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.2 is now available. For the improvements in this release, we focused on performance and configuration, plus updating CodeReady Workspaces 2.2 to use newer versions of the most popular runtimes and stacks. We also added the ability to allocate only the CPU that you need for IDE plugins, and we introduced a new diagnostic feature that lets you start up a workspace in debug mode.

CodeReady Workspaces 2.2 is available on OpenShift 3.11 and OpenShift 4.3 and higher, including tech-preview support for OpenShift 4.5.

Note: Based on Eclipse Che, CodeReady Workspaces is a Red Hat OpenShift-native developer environment that supports cloud-native development.

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Automate workshop setup with Ansible playbooks and CodeReady Workspaces

Automate workshop setup with Ansible playbooks and CodeReady Workspaces

At Red Hat, we do many in-person and virtual workshops for customers, partners, and other open source developers. In most cases, the workshops are of the “bring your own device” variety, so we face a range of hardware and software setups and corporate endpoint-protection schemes, as well as different levels of system knowledge.

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Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.1: Improved cloud tools bring more languages, better flow

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.1: Improved cloud tools bring more languages, better flow

We are pleased to announce the release of Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.1. Based on Eclipse Che, its upstream project, CodeReady Workspaces is a Red Hat OpenShift-native developer environment enabling developer teams for cloud-native development.

CodeReady Workspaces 2.1 is available now on OpenShift 3.11 and OpenShift 4.3+.

This new version introduces:

  • Dashboard: A new onboarding flow.
  • Quarkus: A new workspace gets you started with Quarkus.
  • Languages: The addition of .NET Core 3.1, Java 11, and Camel DSL (Apache Camel K).
  • Other: Editor and AirGap improvements.

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Editing, debugging, and GitHub in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2

Editing, debugging, and GitHub in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2

In a previous article, I showed how to get Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.0 (CRW) up and running with a workspace available for use. This time, we will go through the edit-debug-push (to GitHub) cycle. This walk-through will simulate a real-life development effort.

To start, you’ll need to fork a GitHub repository. The Quote Of The Day repo contains a microservice written in Go that we’ll use for this article. Don’t worry if you’ve never worked with Go. This is a simple program and we’ll only change one line of code.

After you fork the repo, make note of (or copy) your fork’s URL. We’ll be using that information in a moment.

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Red Hat OpenShift 4 on your laptop: Introducing Red Hat CodeReady Containers

Red Hat OpenShift 4 on your laptop: Introducing Red Hat CodeReady Containers

We are pleased to announce that Red Hat CodeReady Containers is now available as a Developer Preview. CodeReady Containers brings a minimal, preconfigured OpenShift 4.1 or newer cluster to your local laptop or desktop computer for development and testing purposes. CodeReady Containers supports native hypervisors for Linux, macOS, and Windows 10. You can download CodeReady Containers from the Red Hat CodeReady Containers product page.

CodeReady Containers is designed for local development and testing on an OpenShift 4 cluster. For running an OpenShift 3 cluster locally, see Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) or Minishift.

In this article, we’ll look at the features and benefits of CodeReady Containers, show a demo of how easy it is to create a local Red Hat OpenShift 4 cluster, and show how to deploy an application on top of it.

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How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Process automation tooling

How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Process automation tooling

The release of the latest Red Hat developer suite version 12 included a name change from Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio to Red Hat CodeReady Studio. The focus here is not on the Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces, a cloud and container development experience, but on the locally installed developers studio. Given that, you might have questions about how to get started with the various Red Hat integration, data, and process automation product toolsets that are not installed out of the box.

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