cloud native

Subsecond deployment and startup of Apache Camel applications

Subsecond deployment and startup of Apache Camel applications

The integration space is in constant change. Many open source projects and closed source technologies did not withstand the tests of time and have disappeared from the middleware stacks for good. After a decade, however, Apache Camel is still here and becoming even stronger for the next decade of integration. In this article, I’ll provide some history of Camel and then describe two changes coming to Apache Camel now (and later to Red Hat Fuse) and why they are important for developers. I call these changes subsecond deployment and subsecond startup of Camel applications.

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EventFlow: Event-driven microservices on OpenShift (Part 1)

EventFlow: Event-driven microservices on OpenShift (Part 1)

This post is the first in a series of three related posts that describes a lightweight cloud-native distributed microservices framework we have created called EventFlow. EventFlow can be used to develop streaming applications that can process CloudEvents, which are an effort to standardize upon a data format for exchanging information about events generated by cloud platforms.

The EventFlow platform was created to specifically target the Kubernetes/OpenShift platforms, and it models event-processing applications as a connected flow or stream of components. The development of these components can be facilitated through the use of a simple SDK library, or they can be created as Docker images that can be configured using environment variables to attach to Kafka topics and process event data directly.

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Sabre chooses Red Hat OpenShift for cloud-native DevOps platform

Sabre chooses Red Hat OpenShift for cloud-native DevOps platform

As part of its strategy to re-imagine the business of travel, Sabre Corporation today announced that it will leverage Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform as the foundation for its Next Generation Platform initiative. OpenShift will be the basis of a modern architecture that includes microservices, development and operations (DevOps), and a multi-faceted cloud strategy to lead an industry evolution in the future of retailing, distribution, and fulfillment through innovative technology. OpenShift, built on containers and Kubernetes, is the the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform for running existing and cloud-native applications in any cloud.

“The Next Generation Platform is the cornerstone of Sabre’s long-term technology strategy,” said Vish Saoji, Sabre CTO. “Red Hat has delivered the enterprise-hardened software environment we need to help drive our technology transformation, and this collaboration allows us to build upon that architecture and execute our plan.”

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Building Container-Native Node.js Applications with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes and Istio

Building Container-Native Node.js Applications with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes and Istio

For developers working on a Kubernetes-based application environment such as Red Hat OpenShift, there are a number things that need to be considered to fully take advantage of the significant benefits provided by these technologies, including:

  • How do I communicate with the orchestration layer to indicate the application is operating correctly and is available to receive traffic?
  • What happens if the application detects a system fault, and how does the application relay this to the orchestration layer?
  • How can I accurately trace traffic flow between my applications in order to identify potential bottlenecks?
  • What tools can I use to easily deploy my updated application as part of my standard toolchain?
  • What happens if I introduce a network fault between my services, and how do I test this scenario?

These questions are central to building container-native solutions. At Red Hat, we define container-native as applications that conform to the following key tenets:

  • DevOps automation
  • Single concern principle
  • Service discovery
  • High observability
  • Lifecycle conformance
  • Runtime confinement
  • Process disposability
  • Image immutability

This may seem like a lot of overhead on top of the core application logic. Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) and Istio provide developers with tools to adhere to these principles with minimal overhead in terms of coding and implementation.

In this blog post, we’re specifically focusing on how RHOAR and Istio combine to provide tools for DevOps automation, lifecycle conformance, high observability, and runtime confinement.

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40+ Cloud Native Development sessions/labs/demos at Red Hat Summit

40+ Cloud Native Development sessions/labs/demos at Red Hat Summit

There’s a whole lot of activity around the complementary aspects of microservices, containers, open source, and cloud, so I’ve assembled this set of sessions/labs/etc. for those of you who want to focus on Cloud Native Development at Red Hat Summit.  We’ll have a printed “Trail Map” version of this as well.  Come find me at the DevZone booth and “hi”.  Mention this blog article and I may have some swag for you.  🙂

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Red Hat Summit 2017 is for developers

Red Hat Summit 2017 is for developers

You may have read or heard that we folded DevNation into Red Hat Summit this year, which means that every Summit attendee has access to developer-related sessions, labs, and more!

Here are some highlights to look forward to at Red Hat Summit (and why you should attend):

  • LOTS of developer content. This is possibly the largest Red Hat-hosted commercial developer event ever with nearly 150 developer-related sessions, labs, BoFs, Lightning talks, CodeStarters [1], classes, and demos, plus nearly 50 Red Hat engineers available for one-on-ones in the new “Ask the Experts” area.
  • Find your sessions. As you search for topics, look at the Application Development track and beyond as you’ll find many additional and relevant sessions in different tracks as well.
  • Hot topic. Microservices, containers, and cloud are all hot topics right now, so for those of you that want to focus on these, we have a Cloud Native Development Trail Map that will help you focus on 40 sessions, labs, and more.

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Microservices Deployments Evolution

Microservices Deployments Evolution

Microservices Are Here, to Stay

A few years back, most software systems had a monolithic architecture and slow release cycle. In the recent years, there is a clear move towards Microservices architecture, which is optimized for scalability, elasticity, failure, and speed of change. This trend has been further enforced by the adoption of cloud and containers, which also enabled practices such as DevOps.

Trends in the IT Industry

All these changes have resulted in a growing number of services to develop and an even bigger number of deployments to do. It soon became clear that the explosion in the number of deployments cannot be controlled using pre-microservices tools and techniques, and new ways have been born. In this article, we will see how Cloud Native platforms such as Kubernetes allow deployment of Microservices in high scale with minimal human intervention.

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