cloud-native apps

Red Hat Summit 2019 Labs: Cloud-native app dev roadmap

Red Hat Summit 2019 Labs: Cloud-native app dev roadmap

Red Hat Summit 2019 is rocking Boston, MA, May 7-9 in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. This event offers everything you need to know about the current state of open source, enterprise-ready software. You’ll find customers talking about leveraging open source in their solutions, and you’ll meet the creators of open source technologies and get to experience their hands-on labs.

The following labs can be found in the session catalog online, by searching on the session title or filtering on “instructor-led lab” and “cloud-native app dev” content. You can also learn more about the Cloud-Native App Dev track sessions in this article.

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Extending support to Spring Boot 2.x for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Extending support to Spring Boot 2.x for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

What Red Hat is providing

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) is a recommended set of products, tools, and components for developing and maintaining cloud-native applications on the Red Hat OpenShift platform. As part of this offering, Red Hat is extending its support to Spring Boot 2 and related frameworks for building modern, production-grade, Java-based cloud-native applications.

Spring Boot lets you create opinionated Spring-based standalone applications. The Spring Boot runtime also integrates with the OpenShift platform, allowing your services to externalize their configuration, implement health checks, provide resiliency and failover, and much more. To learn more about how Spring Boot applications integrate with the wider Red Hat portfolio, check out the following OpenShift Commons Briefing by Thomas Qvarnstrom:

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Building Container-Native Node.js Applications with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes and Istio

Building Container-Native Node.js Applications with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes and Istio

For developers working on a Kubernetes-based application environment such as Red Hat OpenShift, there are a number things that need to be considered to fully take advantage of the significant benefits provided by these technologies, including:

  • How do I communicate with the orchestration layer to indicate the application is operating correctly and is available to receive traffic?
  • What happens if the application detects a system fault, and how does the application relay this to the orchestration layer?
  • How can I accurately trace traffic flow between my applications in order to identify potential bottlenecks?
  • What tools can I use to easily deploy my updated application as part of my standard toolchain?
  • What happens if I introduce a network fault between my services, and how do I test this scenario?

These questions are central to building container-native solutions. At Red Hat, we define container-native as applications that conform to the following key tenets:

  • DevOps automation
  • Single concern principle
  • Service discovery
  • High observability
  • Lifecycle conformance
  • Runtime confinement
  • Process disposability
  • Image immutability

This may seem like a lot of overhead on top of the core application logic. Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) and Istio provide developers with tools to adhere to these principles with minimal overhead in terms of coding and implementation.

In this blog post, we’re specifically focusing on how RHOAR and Istio combine to provide tools for DevOps automation, lifecycle conformance, high observability, and runtime confinement.

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Next DevNation Live: Your Journey to a Serverless World—An Introduction to Serverless, June 7th, 12pm EDT

Next DevNation Live: Your Journey to a Serverless World—An Introduction to Serverless, June 7th, 12pm EDT

Join us for the next online DevNation Live on June 7th at 12pm EDT for Your Journey to a Serverless World—An Introduction to Serverless, presented by Kamesh Sampath and hosted by Burr Sutter.  Serverless computing is an emerging architecture that represents a shift in the way developers build and deliver software systems. By removing application infrastructure concerns, development and deployment are simplified, allowing developers to focus on writing code that delivers value.  Additionally, operational costs can be reduced by only consuming resources when needed to respond to application events.

In this session, we’ll learn what serverless is and what it means to a developer. Then, we’ll quickly deploy a serverless platform using Apache OpenWhisk on Kubernetes. Using this platform, we’ll demystify which Java™ programming model you should use in a serverless environment. And finally, we’ll look at tools that can make your serverless journey quick, easy, and productive.

Watch the recorded session and view the slides.

Session Agenda

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Red Hat Fuse 7 Is Now Available

Red Hat Fuse 7 Is Now Available

Red Hat Fuse 7 (formerly called Red Hat JBoss Fuse) is now officially available. This cloud-native, distributed solution allows developers to easily develop, deploy and scale integration applications. Architects can compose and orchestrate microservices with Red Hat Fuse to introduce agility to the systems. In this release, Fuse also empowers integration experts and business users to become more productive with the self-service low-code platform. With this new agile integration solution, enterprises can now engage in wider collaboration with and among partners at a much quicker pace.

Here’s where you can download it: https://developers.redhat.com/products/fuse/download/.

What’s in Fuse 7?

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Next DevNation Live: Serverless and Servicefull Applications: Where Microservices Complements Serverless, May 17th, 12pm EDT

Next DevNation Live: Serverless and Servicefull Applications: Where Microservices Complements Serverless, May 17th, 12pm EDT

Join us for the next online DevNation Live on May 17th at 12pm EDT for Serverless and Servicefull Applications: Where Microservices Complements Serverless hosted by Burr Sutter.  Serverless is a misnomer. Your future cloud-native applications will consist of both microservices and functions, wrapped in Linux containers, but in many cases where you, the developer, will be able to ignore the operational aspects of managing the infrastructure and even much of the runtime stack.

In this technical session, we will start by using Apache Whisk, a Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS) engine,  deployed on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift to explore how you can complement cloud-native Java applications (microservices) with serverless functions. Next, we’ll open up a serverless web application architecture and deploy an API Gateway into the FaaS platform to examine the microservices talking to the serverless functions. We finish with a look at how event sinks and event sources map in the serverless world.

Watch the recorded session and view the slides.

Session Agenda

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Red Hat Summit Spotlight: Getting Started with Cloud-Native Apps Lab

Red Hat Summit Spotlight: Getting Started with Cloud-Native Apps Lab

Cloud-native application development is the new paradigm for building applications and although is it often mistaken for microservices, it is much more than that and encompasses not only the application architecture but also the process through which applications are built, deployed, and managed.

New apps are often seen as the focus of cloud-native applications; however, we believe existing and new applications are alike and can incorporate cloud-native practices if they have the four defining characteristics of cloud-native applications:

  • Service-based: Build modular loosely coupled services (for example, microservices).
  • API-driven: Expose services via lightweight technology-agnostic APIs.
  • Containers: Package and deploy in containers as a portable unit of compute.
  • DevOps: Adopt agile and DevOps principles.

The Getting Started with Cloud-Native Apps lab at Red Hat Summit 2018, which takes place in San Francisco on May 8–10, has a packed agenda that focuses on walking participants through the principles of building and operating cloud-native applications.

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