Cloud Automation

Using Ansible Galaxy Roles in Ansible Playbook Bundles

Using Ansible Galaxy Roles in Ansible Playbook Bundles

[In case you aren’t following the OpenShift blog, I’m cross posting my article here because I think it will be of interest to the Red Hat Developer commnity.]

The Open Service Broker API standard aims to standardize how services (cloud, third-party, on-premise, legacy, etc) are delivered to applications running on cloud platforms like OpenShift. This allows applications to consume services the exact same way no matter on which cloud platform they are deployed. The service broker pluggable architecture enables admins to add third-party brokers to the platform in order to make third-party and cloud services available to the application developers directly from the OpenShift service catalog. As an example AWS Service Broker created jointly by Amazon and Red Hat, Azure Service Broker created by Microsoft and Helm Service Broker created by Google to allow consumption of AWS services, Azure services and Helm charts on Kubernetes and OpenShift. Furthermore, admins can create their own brokers in order to make custom services like provisioning an Oracle database on their internal Oracle RAC available to the developers through the service catalog.

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Guide to starting to use AWX, the upstream of Red Hat Ansible Tower, on top of OpenShift

Introduction

This is the first post in a series that shows how to use the new release of the community version of Red Hat Ansible Tower. In this post, we will start with the installation of AWX on top of OpenShift. In the next post, I’ll show how to set a dynamic inventory to access the servers from AWS (EC2) and how to run a playbook to access our AWS EC2 inventory.

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