OpenShift for Developers: Set Up a Full Cluster in Under 30 Minutes

One of the common questions I get asked by developers is how they can use OpenShift locally for their own development. Luckily, we have a lot of different options and selecting one depends on the specific development environment that you prefer to work with.

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Spring Boot and OAuth2 with Keycloak

The tutorial Spring Boot and OAuth2 showed how to enable OAuth2 with Spring Boot with Facebook as AuthProvider; this blog is the extension of showing how to use KeyCloak as AuthProvider instead of Facebook. I intend to keep this example as close to the original Spring Boot and OAuth2 and will explain the changes to the configuration to make the same application work with KeyCloak. The source code for the examples are available in the github repositories listed below.

Continue reading Spring Boot and OAuth2 with Keycloak

Red Hat Releases New Versions of DevStudio, CDK, and DevSuite

As the interest in container application development continues to grow, so does our expansion of development tools and features.

Today, Red Hat released new versions of the following:

Here’s a listing of the new features:

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Installing Red Hat Container Development Kit on Fedora

Fedora users seeking help on installing Container Development Kit (CDK), here is how you can install CDK 2.2 on your Fedora 24. These same steps can be used for CDK 2.3 too.

CDK provides a container development environment, to build production-grade applications, for use on OpenShift.

The installation of CDK 2.2 on Fedora essentially involves the following stages:

Setting up your virtualization environment
You need to first install the virtualization software, in this case, KVM/libvirt, and then proceed to install Vagrant and its additional plugins to enable the various features of CDK.

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For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

Debugging Java Applications using the Red Hat Container Development Kit

Containerization technology is fundamentally changing the way applications are packaged and deployed. The ability to create a uniform runtime that can be deployed and scaled is revolutionizing how many organizations develop applications. Platforms such as OpenShift also provide additional benefits such as service orchestration through Kubernetes and a suite of tools for achieving continuous integration and continuous delivery of applications. However, even with all of these benefits, developers still need to be able to utilize the same patterns they have used for years in order for them to be productive. For Java developers, this includes developing in an environment that mimics production and the ability to utilize common development tasks, such as testing and debugging running applications. To bridge the gap developers may face when creating containerized applications, the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) can be utilized to develop, build, test and debug running applications.

Red Hat’s Container Development Kit is a pre-built container development environment that enables developers to create containerized applications targeting OpenShift Enterprise and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Once the prerequisite tooling is installed and configured, starting the CDK is as easy as running the “vagrant up” command. Developers immediately have a fully containerized environment at their fingertips.

More information on the Red Hat Container Development can be found Red Hat Developers, and on the Red Hat Customer Portal

One of the many ways to utilize the CDK is to build, run, and test containerized applications on OpenShift. Java is one of the frameworks that can be run on OpenShift, and these applications can be run in a traditional application server, such as JBoss, as well as in a standalone fashion. Even as runtime methodologies change, being able to debug running applications to validate functionality remains an important component of the software development process. Debugging a remote application in Java is made possible through the use of the Java Debug Wire Protocol (JDWP). By adding a few startup arguments, the application can be configured to accept remote connections, for example, from an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) such as Eclipse. In the following sections, we will discuss how to remotely debug an application deployed to OpenShift running on the CDK from an IDE.

Continue reading “Debugging Java Applications using the Red Hat Container Development Kit”


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For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

DevNation Live Blog: CDK 2.0: Docker, Kubernetes, and OSE on your desk

As a systems engineer, I enjoy building deploying production and pre-production services. These production services tend to be built at scale in a highly redundant architecture.  The problem has always been how do we give developers a sandbox that matches production in all the ways that matters– but without the pain (and love), overhead, compute and networks resources actual production environments require.  Moreover, how does one snapshot this environment so it can be recreated at will.  This has been a holy grail in IT for a while.  While there have many, many attempts at solving this problem, they all seem to have pitfalls and don’t really serve the purpose.

Enter the CDK…

An exciting development in this space is the Red Hat Container Development Kit.  Langdon White, Platform Architect at Red Hat gave his presentation on using CDK 2.0, which is a container CDK based on Vagrant, Docker, Kubernetes, and OpenShift.  It also has Eclipse integration… basically, everything someone needs to build production-quality applications for use on OpenShift.

Langdon starts with decomposition being a major driving factor in today’s software development world. Docker gives us a major step-forward in decomposition and helps with the separation between system errata updates and what the application actually requires.  The CDK will help in your journey to re-architect your applications and “sprinkle in some devops” (one of my favorite new phrases from the DevNation keynote).

The CDK runs on Windows, Mac and Linux (of course).  It ships with Vagrant files allowing you to easily execute the CDK VMs without having to install everything yourself.  The CDK Eclipse has plugin integration for Vagrant, allowing one to run the VMs from within Eclipse, which is kind of cool.  From there you can start the OpenShift Local VM for deploying your code, mimicking a production push.

Still within Eclipse, you can define your Dockerfile, giving your container all the dependencies your application requires, including the base image.  Of course, you can define multiple ones of each tier of your application, all without leaving your development environment.

Continue reading “DevNation Live Blog: CDK 2.0: Docker, Kubernetes, and OSE on your desk”


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More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014 was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. View some of the DevNation 2015 session recordings here.  DevNation 2016 will be in San Francisco, USA, the week of June 26.  Be sure to follow its status and register at www.devnation.org.

A Windows Guy’s Guide: Setting up .NET Core on RHEL

Despite spending plenty of time in Red Hat Linux while I was young, I have become an unabashed Windows environment super-user/programmer. Still, it’s hard to discount the multitude of ways that the *nix community stands ahead and alone, so when Microsoft and Red Hat announced their partnership to bring .NET to Linux, I had no choice but to take notice. As an experiment, I am going to go through setting up Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and .NET Core to see if I can’t have a little fun and test the technology before it’s even at its first release.

This post is the first of two, with the final goal of learning how to convert an existing .NET application to .NET Core. But first we have to set up .NET Core on RHEL. (Also note that RHEL is now available at no cost for developer use! You can download it here.)

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Use Vagrant Landrush to add DNS features to your OpenShift CDK Machine

With the release of the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), it’s been easier to set up a development environment with OpenShift to create, develop and test your own containerized applications, and easier evaluate different CI/CD strategies with Jenkins — strategies that reflect your team’s unique culture.

However, when you want to access applications by their DNS names, you cannot do so because there is no DNS server pointing to that name. That is, of course, until now!

Vagrant provides a very nice plugin that can use dnsmasq to create a DNS caching server to provide this access.

Continue reading “Use Vagrant Landrush to add DNS features to your OpenShift CDK Machine”


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For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

Update: Red Hat Container Development Kit 2 Beta

Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) is a pre-built container development environment based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux to help you get started developing container-based applications quickly. The containers you build can be easily deployed on any Red Hat container host or platform, including: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, and our platform-as-a-service solution, OpenShift Enterprise 3.

Get started with containers on Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows, or Linux

To save you from having to assemble a container development environment from scratch, CDK delivers the latest container tools in a Red Hat Enterprise Linux virtual machine that you can use on your Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows, RHEL or Fedora Linux system. In addition, you have your choice of virtualization platforms (VirtualBox, VMware, and the Linux KVM/libvirt hypervisors are all supported). All of the VM configuration details on your system are handled for you by Vagrant, an open-source tool for creating and distributing portable and reproducible development environments.

Continue reading “Update: Red Hat Container Development Kit 2 Beta”


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