Camel K

Six reasons to love Camel K

Six reasons to love Camel K

Apache Camel K is a lightweight cloud-integration platform that runs natively on Kubernetes and, in particular, lets you automate your cloud configurations. Based on the famous Apache Camel, Camel K is designed and optimized for serverless and microservices architectures. In this article, I discuss six ways that Camel K transforms how developers work with Kubernetes, Red Hat OpenShift, and Knative on cloud platforms.

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Build and deploy a serverless app with Camel K and Red Hat OpenShift Serverless 1.5.0 Tech Preview

Build and deploy a serverless app with Camel K and Red Hat OpenShift Serverless 1.5.0 Tech Preview

Red Hat OpenShift Serverless 1.5.0 (currently in tech preview) runs on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 4.3. It enables stateful, stateless, and serverless workloads to all operate on a single multi-cloud container platform. Apache Camel K is a lightweight integration platform that runs natively on Kubernetes. Camel K has serverless superpowers.

In this article, I will show you how to use OpenShift Serverless and Camel K to create a serverless Java application that you can scale up or down on demand.

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Camel K standalone Java file: Now with Java language support

Camel K standalone Java file: Now with Java language support

Apache Camel K should be as lightweight as possible. Therefore, the Camel K project provides standalone Java files to describe a Camel integration. The downside to this practice is that existing IDEs cannot provide complete support out of the box. To provide a complete experience with Apache Camel K’s standalone Java files, there were three solutions:

As a result, there is no intuitive configuration. However, Red Hat’s Tooling for Apache Camel K offers a new possibility.

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Apache Camel K development inside Eclipse Che: Iteration 1

Apache Camel K development inside Eclipse Che: Iteration 1

The Eclipse Che 7.6.0 release provides a new stack for Apache Camel K integration development. This release is the first iteration to give a preview of what is possible. If you like what you see, shout it out, and more will surely come.

This article details how to test this release on a local instance deployed on minikube. The difference with a hosted instance is that we avoid the prerequisites involving Camel K installation in the cluster and specific rights for the user.

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Cloud-native integration with Kubernetes and Camel K

Cloud-native integration with Kubernetes and Camel K

Our first DevNation Live regional event was held in Bengaluru, India in July. This free technology event focused on open source innovations, with sessions presented by elite Red Hat technologists.

In this session, Kamesh Sampath shows how to apply common Enterprise Integration Patterns (EIP) with Apache Camel, Kubernetes, and Red Hat OpenShift. You will see how the new Camel K framework helps in deploying Camel DSL code as “integrations” in Kubernetes/OpenShift.

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Sending a telegram with Apache Camel K and Visual Studio Code

Sending a telegram with Apache Camel K and Visual Studio Code

When I was introduced to Apache Camel K a few months ago, I was amazed at how quickly developers could write and deploy an Apache Camel-based integration on Kubernetes. We immediately started work on creating Microsoft Visual Studio (VS) Code-based tools to make things even easier.

What is Camel K? It’s a lightweight integration framework built from Apache Camel and designed for a serverless/microsystem world that runs natively on Kubernetes. It lets developers write integrations in their favorite Camel DSL and quickly deploy them on Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift. You can even write your integrations in lightweight languages like Groovy or JavaScript.

We already built language support in VS Code for Apache Camel using the Language Server Protocol (LSP), offering auto-completion for Camel component URIs in both XML and Java. More recently, we began adding the same support for Groovy, JavaScript, YAML, and Kotlin. (See the Apache Camel LSP client project for details.)

Now, with our new Tooling for Apache Camel K by Red Hat extension, we add support for Camel K in your IDE. To illustrate the tools in action, let’s start with a simple user story inspired by an article that Nicola Ferraro wrote a few years ago (Creating a Telegram Bot in 5 minutes with Apache Camel).

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DevNation Live: Kubernetes enterprise integration patterns with Camel K

DevNation Live: Kubernetes enterprise integration patterns with Camel K

DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. This talk from Nicola Ferraro and Luca Burgazzoli will explore Camel K, a lightweight integration platform that allows enterprise integration patterns to be used natively on any Kubernetes cluster.

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Build and deploy an API with Camel K on Red Hat OpenShift

Build and deploy an API with Camel K on Red Hat OpenShift

With the growing number of APIs and microservices, the time given to creating and integrating them has become shorter and shorter. That’s why we need an integration framework with tooling to quickly build an API and include capabilities for a full API life cycle. Camel K lets you build and deploy your API on Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift in less than a second. Unbelievable, isn’t it?

For those who are not familiar with it, Camel K is a subproject of Apache Camel with the target of building a lightweight runtime for running integration code directly on cloud platforms like Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. It was inspired by serverless principles, and it will also target Knative shortly. The article by Nicola Ferraro will give you a good introduction.

In this article, I’ll show how to build an API with Camel K. For that, we will start first by designing our API using Apicurio Studio, which is based on the OpenAPI standard, and then we will provide the OpenAPI standard document to Camel K in order to implement the API and deploy it to Red Hat OpenShift.

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