Business Rules

Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

It’s been some time since I last talked with you about putting JBoss BPM Suite (now called Red Hat Process Automation Manager) into your cloud, and with the new release, it’s time to talk AppDev in the cloud again.

It’s time to update the story and see how to put Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud so you are set up with a standard configuration to start your first business rules project.

With the easy installation demo project described below, you can leverage process automation tooling through the business central web console running containerized on any Red Hat OpenShift.

Let’s take a closer look at how this works.

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Quickly try Red Hat Decision Manager in your Cloud

Quickly try Red Hat Decision Manager in your Cloud

It’s been some time since I last talked with you about business logic engines and using them in application development cloud architectures. At that time, I showcased running JBoss BRMS in a container on Red Hat OpenShift. This gives you the cloud experience, one that’s portable across private and public clouds, but on your own local laptop using Red Hat Container Development Kit.

The world continues to move forward, a new product has been released which replaced JBoss BRMS with the Red Hat Decision Manager, so now I want to provide a way for you to install this on OpenShift, in the same easy to use demo format.

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Detecting credit card fraud with Red Hat Decision Manager 7

Detecting credit card fraud with Red Hat Decision Manager 7

Red Hat Decision Manager provides a vast array of decision management functionality. From the Decision Tables feature in the new Decision Model and Notation (DMN) v1.1, which implements the full FEEL Compliance Level 3 of the DMN specification, to Predictive Model Markup Language (PMML).

Another powerful feature is the Complex Event Processing (CEP) engine. This engine provides the ability to detect, correlate, abstract, aggregate or compose and react to events. In other words, the technology provides techniques to infer complex events from simple events, react to the events of interest, and take actions. The main difference between CEP and normal rules execution is the notion of time. Where standard rules execution in Decision Manager deals with facts and reasoning over these facts, the CEP engine focusses on events. An event represents a significant change of state at a particular point in time or interval.

Recently, I was asked to demonstrate how Decision Manager CEP can be used in a real-time credit card fraud detection system. One of the requirements I was presented with ended up in an interesting rule implementation that forms the basis of this article. The requirement was defined as follows:

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Your first Business Rules application on OpenShift: from Zero to Hero in 30 minutes

Your first Business Rules application on OpenShift: from Zero to Hero in 30 minutes

In a previous blog post, we explained how to deploy an existing JBoss BRMS/Drools rules project onto an OpenShift DecisionServer. We created a decision/business-rules microservice on OpenShift Container Platform that was implemented by a BRMS application. The polyglot nature of a microservice architecture allowed us to use the best implementation (a rules engine) for this given functionality (business rules execution) in our architecture.

The project we used was an existing rules project that was available on GitHub. We did however not explain how one can create a project from scratch in the JBoss BRMS Business Central environment and deploy it on OpenShift Container Platform. That is what we will explore in this article.

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Account Management with JBoss BPM Suite

Red Hat’s IT department recently deployed JBoss BPM Suite to handle automated process workflow. JBoss BPM Suite is officially defined as:

An open source business process management suite that combines Business Process Management and Business Rules Management and enables business and IT users to create, manage, validate, and deploy Business Processes and Rules.

IT’s immediate use case is to replace our aging account management system, which is essentially a collection of perl and python scripts.  Some of these date back to the turn of the millennium. These scripts had the responsibility of handling all aspects of user life cycle management, including:

  • Pulling user data from the HRMS
  • Creating the user LDAP object
  • Creating the user group LDAP object
  • Creating application accounts (home directories, mailboxes, etc)
  • Updating LDAP objects with HRMS changes
  • Closing user accounts and removing LDAP objects upon termination
  • Syncing account information with third party systems (SaaS vendors, etc)

These legacy scripts would perform SQL queries directly against multiple data sources and call LDAP operations, application command line tools and make API calls. While this system worked well for many years, maintenance became an incredible burden. In essence, only one person knew the account automation system. New application integration requests would have to wait months for resources to free up. For applications allowing direct API integration, that meant some pour soul (me) would have to spend a fair amount of time just figuring out how this new application worked and what API calls were necessary. Moreover, when a vendor would suddenly change their API, that meant something was broken until there was time to fix it. The result was Service Desk team having to perform hundreds of manual operations in the mean time. Essentially, the maintainer could not scale with demand, let alone have the time to become an expert in every new application.

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