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Improved support information for RHEL on Azure: sosreport plugin updated

Improved support information for RHEL on Azure: sosreport plugin updated

Red Hat Enterprise Linux has a tool called sosreport that improves the ability to get support by collecting accurate current details of system information, configuration, and diagnostic information. The “sos” command is an excellent point to start the investigation when your system has an issue. In addition, the file generated by sosreport is usually a starting point when a Red Hat support engineer investigates. Even if you’re not an administrator but a developer, the sosreport is easy to use.  Just type “sos“ using sudo or as root.

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Deploying MicroProfile apps on Microsoft Azure using the Azure Open Service Broker

Deploying MicroProfile apps on Microsoft Azure using the Azure Open Service Broker

At the recently concluded Microsoft Ignite 2018 conference in Orlando, I had the honor of presenting to a crowd of Java developers and Azure professionals eager to learn how to put their Java skills to work building next-gen apps on Azure. Of course, that meant showcasing the technology coming out of the popular MicroProfile community, in which Red Hat plays a big part (and makes a fully supported, productized MicroProfile implementation through Thorntail, part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes).

We did a demo too, which is the main topic of this blog post, showing how easy it is to link your Java MicroProfile apps to Azure services through the Open Service Broker for Azure (the open source, Open Service Broker-compatible API server that provisions managed services in the Microsoft Azure public cloud) and OpenShift’s Service Catalog.

Here’s how to reproduce the demo.

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Red Hat Summit: Developing .NET Core Apps on Red Hat OpenShift

Red Hat Summit: Developing .NET Core Apps on Red Hat OpenShift

At Red Hat Summit 2018, Red Hat’s John Osborne and Microsoft’s Harold Wong gave a talk: Developing .NET Core Applications on Red Hat OpenShift.

.NET Core 1.0 availability for Linux was announced two years ago, but many developers still have a number of questions about the differences between .NET Framework and .NET Core. The session started with an overview of the differences. In a nutshell, .NET Framework is the set of APIs and libraries that Windows developers have used to years, which is pretty heavily tied to Microsoft Windows and Windows GUI APIs. On the other hand, .NET Core is the cross-platform set of APIs that are available for building applications that can run on Linux, macOS, or mobile devices via Xamarin.  .Net Core 2.0 was released last August; see Don Schenck’s article.

One of the key questions is when to use one versus the other.  Here’s the summary Harold Wong presented:

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Deallocate an Azure VM Using the Azure CLI on RHEL

Deallocate an Azure VM Using the Azure CLI on RHEL

If you’re running Red Hat Enterprise Linux server on Microsoft Azure, you may want to shut down and deallocate the VM using commands inside of the VM itself for automation or just for convenience. On Azure, if you shut down the VM by using shutdown -h or another OS command, it will stop but not deallocate it.  The stopped VM is still using resources and will continue to incur compute charges. To avoid that, this article shows how a VM can shut itself down and deallocate its resources using the Azure CLI 2.0.

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It’s Time To Accelerate Your Application Development With Red Hat JBoss Middleware And Microsoft Azure

It’s Time To Accelerate Your Application Development With Red Hat JBoss Middleware And Microsoft Azure

The role of applications has changed dramatically. In the past, applications were running businesses, but primarily relegated to the background. They were critical, but more operational in the sense that they kept businesses running, more or less. Today, organizations can use applications as a competitive advantage. In fact, a well-developed, well-timed application can disrupt an entire industry. Just take a look at the hotel, taxi, and movie rental industries respectively.

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