architecture

Integration of storage services (part 6)

Integration of storage services (part 6)

In Part 5 this series, we looked into details that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

It started with laying out the process of how I’ve approached the use case by researching successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for a generic architectural blueprint. Now it’s time to cover various blueprint details.

This article covers the final elements in the blueprint, storage services, which are fundamental to the generic architectural overview.

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Integration of container platform essentials (Part 5)

Integration of container platform essentials (Part 5)

In Part 4 of this series, we looked into details that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your omnichannel customer experience.

It started with laying out the process of how I’ve approached the use case by researching successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for a generic architectural blueprint. Now it’s time to cover more blueprint details.

This article discusses the core elements in the blueprint (container platform and microservices) that are crucial to the generic architectural overview.

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Integration of API management details (Part 4)

Integration of API management details (Part 4)

In Part 3 of this series, we started diving into the details that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

It started with laying out the process of how I’ve approached the use case by researching successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for a generic architectural blueprint. Now it’s time to cover various blueprint details.

This article takes you deeper into specific elements (API management and reverse proxy) of the generic architectural overview.

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Integration of external application details (Part 3)

Integration of external application details (Part 3)

In Part 2 of this series, we took a high-level view of the common architectural elements that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

I laid out how I’ve approached the use case and how I’ve used successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for researching a generic architectural blueprint. The only thing left to cover was the order in which you’ll be led through the blueprint details.

This article takes you deeper to cover details pertaining to the specific elements (mobile and web application deployments) of the generic architectural overview.

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Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

It’s been some time since I last talked with you about putting JBoss BPM Suite (now called Red Hat Process Automation Manager) into your cloud, and with the new release, it’s time to talk AppDev in the cloud again.

It’s time to update the story and see how to put Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud so you are set up with a standard configuration to start your first business rules project.

With the easy installation demo project described below, you can leverage process automation tooling through the business central web console running containerized on any Red Hat OpenShift.

Let’s take a closer look at how this works.

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Common architectural elements for modern integration architectures (Part 2)

Common architectural elements for modern integration architectures (Part 2)

In Part 1 of this series, we explored a use case around integration being the key to transforming your customer experience.

I laid out how I’ve approached the use case and how I’ve used successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for researching a generic architectural blueprint. The only thing left to cover was the order in which you’ll be led through the blueprint details.

This article, which is Part 2 of the series, starts the real journey at the very top, with a generic architecture from which we’ll discuss the common architectural elements one by one.

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How integration is key to customer experience (Part 1)

How integration is key to customer experience (Part 1)

For the past few months, I’ve been digging into my new role with a group of Portfolio Architects, looking specifically at integration as the key to omnichannel customer experience.

It’s an interesting challenge in that we’ve been given the mission of creating architectural content based on common customer adoption patterns. That’s very different from most of the traditional marketing activities usually associated with generating content for the sole purpose of positioning products for solutions. When you’re basing the content on actual execution in solution delivery, you’re cutting out the chuff. 

What’s that mean?

It means that it’s going to provide you with a way to implement a solution using open source technologies by focusing on the integrations, structures, and interactions that actually have been proven to work.

What’s not included is any vendor promises that you’ll find in normal marketing content: those promises that, when it gets down to implementation crunch time, might not fully deliver.

Enter the term architectural blueprint. 

In this series of articles, let’s look at these blueprints, how they are created, and what value they provide for your solution designs.

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Patterns for distributed transactions within a microservices architecture

Patterns for distributed transactions within a microservices architecture

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Microservices architecture (MSA) has become very popular.. However, one common problem is how to manage distributed transactions across multiple microservices. This post is going to share my experience from past projects and explain the problem and possible patterns that could solve it.

What is a distributed transaction?

When a microservice architecture decomposes a monolithic system into self-encapsulated services, it can break transactions. This means a local transaction in the monolithic system is now distributed into multiple services that will be called in a sequence.

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The rise of non-microservices architectures

The rise of non-microservices architectures

This post is a short summary of my recent experiences with customers that are implementing architectures similar to microservices but with different characteristics in the current post-microservices world.

The microservices architectural style has been around for close to five years now, and much has been said and written about it. Today, I see teams deciding not to strictly follow certain principles of the “pure” microservices architecture and to break some of the “rules.” Teams are now more informed about the pros and cons of microservices, and they make context-driven decisions respecting team experience and organizational boundaries and accept the fact that not every company is Netflix. Below are some examples I have seen in my recent microservices gigs.

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Hexagonal Architecture  as a Natural fit for Apache Camel

Hexagonal Architecture as a Natural fit for Apache Camel

There are architectures and patterns that look cool on paper, and there are ones that are good in practice. Implementing the hexagonal architecture with Camel is both: cool to talk about, and a natural implementation outcome. I love going hexagonal with Camel because it is one of these combinations where the architecture and the tool come together naturally, and many end up doing it without realizing it. Let’s see why that is the case.

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