Low-risk Monolith to Microservice Evolution Part I

As part of a two-day microservices workshop I’m putting together, I’ve been thinking a lot about how to explain monolith-application decomposition and what a transition to microservices might look like. This is a small subset of that material, but I want to share it with you to get feedback (in the workshop we go into more detail about whether you should even break up your monolith). I base this on my own tried and true real-life experience as well as my work with the many Red Hat customers I’ve met over North America for the last few years. Part I explores the architecture while the second part (to be released shortly) will cover some technology that can greatly help in this area. Follow along (@christianposta) on Twitter or http://developers.redhat.com for the latest updates and discussion.

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7 Things to Worry About w/Microservices

So recently, the idea that Monoliths should be discouraged and that Microservices be embraced has taken over the Software Development space. A project made into a single code base is to be taken out and broken into manageable pieces. It is better to work with manageable sub-units than a whole bunch of one big stuff. Well, as the saying goes, small-scale always wins.

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An Incremental Path to Microservices

As a consultant for Red Hat, I have the privilege of seeing many customers. Some of them are working to find ways to split their applications in smaller chunks to implement the microservices architecture. I’m sure this trend is generalized even outside my own group of the customers.

There is undoubtedly hype around microservices. Some organizations are moving toward microservices because it’s a trend, rather than to achieve a clear and measurable objective.

In the process, these organizations are missing a few key points, and when we all awake from this microservices “hype”, some of these organizations will discover that they now have to take care of ten projects when before they had one, without any tangible gain.

To understand what it takes to reap real benefits from microservices, let’s look at how this neologism came to being.

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