API

Organizing Microservices – Modern Integration

Organizing Microservices – Modern Integration

Microservices is probably one of the most popular buzz words among my fellow developer friends, and I do like the concept of being flexible, agile and having simply having more choices. But as a person that worked in the software integration space for years, I started to see some resemblance of the old ESB days.

Looking at the problem from ten thousand feet up. A decade ago, we had to come up with a better way of organizing the spaghetti connection in between systems, stop duplicating effort on the same piece of business logic. That is when service-oriented architecture (SOA) became popular. By modularizing services, sharing them among others systems, and organize ways of communication, routing of data. And ESB is one implementation of that, maybe not necessarily how it should be done.

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Kill your API: the burger analogy

Kill your API: the burger analogy

The other day I had a chat with the folks working on the OpenAPI initiative and I explained a trick that some of us in enterprises use to get greater speeds and scalability out of our API’s. At first, this may seem like complete sacrilege to those who are a stickler for standards but if you allow me to explain using a simple analogy, you may see how this can be useful…

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Reference Architecture for Agile Integration

Reference Architecture for Agile Integration

Integration is still around but in a different form. So, what does modern integration look like? Looking at how agile scrum has taken over traditional waterfall development framework, by enabling shorter delivery cycles, faster feedback, and having the flexibility to rapidly adapt to changes. I believe it’s time for traditional integration to be agile again. By breaking up traditional ESB into distributed microservices.

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Innovating on Developers Events, Building the API Escape Room

Innovating on Developers Events, Building the API Escape Room

It’s been almost a month after the first world edition of API Escape room at the Red Hat Summit in Boston. We thought you might be interested to hear details on how we prepared this event.

With the 3scale team, we often participated in classical hackathons where developers gather for 48 hours to come up with a working prototype. These were awesomely fun (!), but the outcomes of those events are quite uncertain for organizers, sponsors, and participants. You cannot guarantee that hackers will build stunning original hacks and it can be a tough ask to keep working for such a long period. You can’t be sure that it won’t just be another “recipe app” or “Uber for X”.

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2016 API predictions

2016 API predictions

The API field progressed in leaps and bounds in the past with impressive new APIs, standards advances, conferences and unfortunately also more negative events like security breaches. Given all that activity, it’s a tough call to guess what might be next. What’s certainly true is that there will be more growth in store! There were already prediction pieces out there for 2016 like Yves de Montcheuil’s, Neha Sampat’s great 10 API predictions presentation at APIDays Paris and Mark Boyd’s great piece on the potential economic impact of APIs in 2016.

APIs are showing up in a wide range of future projections in all sorts of industries from financial services to data centers and healthcare. We’re also expecting a bumper year for API growth. However, this still leaves questions: what the growth areas will be, and what will be important to get the most out of 2016 for APIs? Here’s our shot at 2016 API predictions:

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How to load test and tune performance on your API

How to load test and tune performance on your API

The role of APIs has evolved a lot over the past few years. Not long ago, web APIs were mainly used as simple integration points between internal systems. That is no longer true. Nowadays, APIs often are the core system of a company, one on top of which several client – web and mobile – applications are built.

When APIs were only used for back-office tasks such as extracting reports, their performance was never a key factor. However, APIs have slowly moved towards the critical path between an end-user and the service a company offers. This increase in criticality entails a direct consequence: performance of APIs really matters now.

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