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How to set up a LAMP stack quickly on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

How to set up a LAMP stack quickly on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

Have you tried the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL8) Beta yet? Read on to learn how to stand up a LAMP stack on top of RHEL8 Beta quickly, and play around with new features built into the operating system.

A LAMP stack is made up out of four main components, and some glue. The first main component in a LAMP stack is Linux. In my example, I’m using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta for that, which gives me a secure operating system, a modern programming environment, and user-friendly set of tools to control it.

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The wait is over: JBoss Web Server 5 with Tomcat 9 is here!

The wait is over: JBoss Web Server 5 with Tomcat 9 is here!

We are excited to announce the General Availability release of Red Hat JBoss Web Server 5.0 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Other platforms are will be released shortly. This release includes a technology preview of transactions processing through Narayana. JBoss Web Server 5 is available in the ZIP or RPM format from the JBoss Web Server 5.0 Maven repository and Container Catalog.

JBoss Web Server combines market-leading open source technologies with enterprise capabilities to provide a single solution for large-scale websites and lightweight web applications. It combines the world’s most deployed web server (Apache) with the top servlet engine (Tomcat) and the best support in middleware (from Red Hat).

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Red Hat updates Python, PHP, Node.js, more; supports new arches

Red Hat updates Python, PHP, Node.js, more; supports new arches

I am pleased to announce the immediate availability of Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source development tools, dynamic languages, databases, and more. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges development agility and production stability by helping you create modern applications that can be confidently deployed into production. Most of these components are also available in Linux container image format to streamline microservices development.

In addition to these new components having traditional support for x86_64, Red Hat Software Collection 3.0 Beta adds support for three new architectures: s390x, aarch64, and ppc64le.

NEW ADDITIONS to Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta include:

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Getting started with Apache Camel and the Internet of Things

When I was first introduced to Java Enterprise Integration, the ServiceMix platform was transitioning to OSGi (ServiceMix Version 4.0). From its origins in embedded systems and mobile devices, the OSGi standard promoted many qualities that were advantageous to the Enterprise (flexible, modular, life cycle management, services, security) so under this umbrella the tenants of the stack Apache Camel, Apache ActiveMQ, and Apache CXF flourished.

Apache ServiceMix is a flexible, open-source integration container that unifies the features and functionality of Apache ActiveMQ, Camel, CXF, and Karaf into a powerful runtime platform you can use to build your own integrations solutions. It provides a complete, enterprise ready ESB exclusively powered by OSGi.”

Fast forward a number of years, and now the Internet of Things (IoT) is proliferating across embedded devices. Small single-board computers such as the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone have made the entry into building an IoT solution much more accessible because of their low cost, support in the open source community, and growing support for devices and sensors. At the same time, JBoss Fuse (with its ServiceMix and Fabric lineage) has become central to Enterprise Integration.

So now is the time for Enterprise Integration to go full circle and contribute back to these Embedded Systems. Apache Camel, an implementation of the Enterprise Integration Platterns, is a perfect choice to assist a developer in communicating with these devices and sensors. Out of the box, message mediation, routing, transformation, along with a set of patterns (throttling/sync/asynch) to implement on a message endpoint is possible. But to make this a full solution, Camel Components are required to interface with new standards such as Raspberry Pi GPIO, I2C, Tinkerforge, as well as support for gateway frameworks such as Eclipse Kura (OSGi based). And once the device/sensor information is available, this information needs to be communicated via a set of backend services through a protocol of your choice.

This is the premise behind Rhiot, which is now being rolled in Eclipse Kura and Eclipse Kapua.

Founded by Claus Ibsen, Rob Davies, Greg, and Henryk Konsek this project initially started as Camel IoT Labs, but as the scope went beyond just camel the project was renamed to Rhiot. The documentation for the project can found at gitbooks.

This article will now document how to get Rhiot up and running on a Raspberry Pi.

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Setting up a LAMP stack on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

You obviously know what a LAMP stack is if you’ve managed to find your way here, but for those who may be unsure, the key is in the name (L)inux (A)pache (M)ariaDB (P)HP—a term that has become synonymous around the globe for building a basic web server with database and PHP functionality. There are a myriad of web applications, ranging from WordPress to Joomla to Magento that all use this setup, and if you know how to get it up and running, then you’re off to a great start. It couldn’t be easier with RHEL, so let’s get started. MariaDB can also be exchanged for MySQL or a database of your choice.

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Red Hat Software Collections 2 – now generally available

Red Hat Software Collections 2 – now generally available

Excellent news – Red Hat has announced the general availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.softwarecollections-logo-colorful

You’ll see considerable additions to support multiple language versions. For example, it includes updates to “Python 2.7, continues to support Python 3.3 and also adds Python 3.4 – providing a fully-supported language library and blending developer agility with production stability.”

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Dockerfiles now available for Red Hat Software Collections

Dockerfiles now available for Red Hat Software Collections

Shipping_containers_at_ClydeWe recently announced that we’ve made available a set of Dockerfiles for Red Hat Software Collections.  We are making these available since we think they may be useful to customers looking to build more complex application containers on top of RHEL and RHSCL. We don’t intend the Dockerfiles to produce useful standalone images which you’ll immediately put in production – the Docker images which these create are very simple containers which give you RHEL plus the basic set of packages from a particular RHSCL collection.

There are two different ways to get your hands on the Dockerfiles:

  1. From the upstream source at github 
  2. From a new package, rhscl-dockerfiles, which we’ve shipped in the RHSCL channels – both for RHEL6 and RHEL7

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Using Apache httpd 2.4 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6

Using Apache httpd 2.4 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6

For a long time one of the most frequent requests from users of Apache httpd on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 has been “Why aren’t you shipping Apache 2.4 yet?”. Well, the good news is: we are! There are actually two ways for Red Hat Enterprise Linux users to get httpd 2.4. The first is to upgrade to RHEL 7, which comes with httpd 2.4.6 natively.

Apache http server 188 × 129

The second is to use Red Hat Software Collections on RHEL 6, and that’s what I’m going to talk about in this blog post. First up, how to get the bits?

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Webinar recording – Red Hat Software Collections for RHEL 6 and 7

We recently hosted and recorded a webinar that talks to the latest for Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) 1.1 available for both Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7

Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) delivers the latest, stable versions of dynamic languages, open source databases, and web development tools, all with a faster release cadence (to keep up with the upstream) and supported for 3 years. 

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