Ansible Tower

Vault IDs in Red Hat Ansible and Red Hat Ansible Tower

Vault IDs in Red Hat Ansible and Red Hat Ansible Tower

This article demonstrates the use of multiple vault passwords through vault IDs. You will learn how to use vault IDs to encrypt a file and a string. Once they’re encrypted, the vault ID can be referenced inside a playbook and used within Red Hat Ansible and Red Hat Ansible Tower.

Starting with Ansible 2.4 and above, vault IDs are supported

Vault IDs help you encrypt different files with different passwords to be referenced inside a playbook. Before Ansible 2.4, only one vault password could be used in each Ansible playbook. In effect, every file needed to be encrypted using the same vault password.

To begin with, vault IDs need to be pre-created and referenced inside your ansible.cfg file. The following excerpt is from ansible-config list for the configuration DEFAULT_VAULT_IDENTITY_LIST:

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How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, I will show how to install and manage Red Hat Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. Ansible Tower helps you scale IT automation, manage complex deployments, and improve productivity. You can centralize and control your IT infrastructure with a visual dashboard, and it provides role-based access control, job scheduling, integrated notifications, graphical inventory management, and more.

As you may know, Ansible Tower 3.3, the latest release of this automation platform, was released a few weeks ago and added new features. From the release notes you’ll see that Ansible Tower 3.3 added support for a container-based installation on top of OpenShift

In this blog, we’ll see how easy it is to set up Ansible Tower 3.3 on OpenShift and have it running as a container in just a few minutes.

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Understanding Ansible Tower Isolated Nodes

Understanding Ansible Tower Isolated Nodes

Today I want to talk of one of the great, brand new features that Ansible Tower introduced in version 3.2: Ansible Tower Isolated Nodes.

Thanks to this feature, you’ll be able to create an isolated (Ansible-Tower) node in a restricted network that will manage automation jobs for the main tower, reporting results!

To quote the release statement:

“A Tower Isolated Node is a headless Ansible Tower node that can be used for local execution capacity, either in a constrained networking environment such as a DMZ or VPC, or in a remote data center for local execution capacity. The only prerequisite is that there is SSH connectivity from the Tower Cluster to the Isolated Node. The Tower Cluster will send all jobs for the relevant inventory to the Isolated Node, run them there, and then pull the job details back into Ansible Tower for viewing and reporting.”

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Guide to starting to use AWX, the upstream of Red Hat Ansible Tower, on top of OpenShift

Introduction

This is the first post in a series that shows how to use the new release of the community version of Red Hat Ansible Tower. In this post, we will start with the installation of AWX on top of OpenShift. In the next post, I’ll show how to set a dynamic inventory to access the servers from AWS (EC2) and how to run a playbook to access our AWS EC2 inventory.

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