Software Collections on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Did you ever wish you had newer versions of the software on your Red Hat Enterprise Linux machines? You are probably not alone. Providing new versions of software in rpm is hard, because rpm supports only one version installed on your computer at a time. Multiple versions on one machine can conflict with each other or create unpredictable behaviour in applications that you might not have considered dependencies.

Last year, we developed Software Collections to allow you to install newer versions of software in rpm safely into /opt and switch between new and old releases. This allows your Red Hat Enterprise Linux system applications to continue to run with the old version, while new apps can work with the new version. A good example of this is Python; many essential packages are written in Python. How can you update to the latest release of Python without causing half your system to break? Through Software Collections, you can install a newer version of Python – for example python-3.3 – into /opt avoiding conflicts in files and strange behaviour of apps that depend on an older version of Python.

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Red Hat Developer Toolset 1.1 Now Available through Developer-focused Subscriptions

Today Red Hat announces the general availability of version 1.1 of Red Hat Developer Toolset through Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Subscriptions. For developers, having ready access to the latest, stable development tools is key to taking advantage of open source innovation. Red Hat Developer Toolset 1.1 bridges development agility with production stability by delivering the latest stable versions of essential C and C++ development tools. By employing Red Hat Developer Toolset, organizations can significantly increase developer productivity and improve deployment times.

Red Hat Developer Toolset helps to reduce development and deployment time by allowing users to compile once for multiple versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and more easily diagnose and debug applications in development. Using Red Hat Developer Toolset, software developers can develop applications that run on multiple versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Applications developed on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 can run on both Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.

Red Hat Developer Toolset 1.1 delivers the following significant enhancements:

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Is your C++ development team missing out? Developer Toolset: newer tools on and for multiple RHEL releases

Wouldn’t it be nice if your software development team could use one common set of development tools based on the latest, stable upstream versions for your Red Hat Enterprise Linux development? Think of all the extra years of open source innovation – the features, optimizations and new standards support it would allow your team to build into your products. That would be great, wouldn’t it?

Fortunately, this is already available to you today, and in this blog post I’ll explain how it works and how you can get it. Red Hat Developer Toolset provides a set of additional tools installed in parallel with those delivered as part of Red Hat Enterprise Linux itself. Currently featuring the GCC C/C++ compiler and GDB debugger and backed up by Red Hat’s solid customer support, Red Hat Developer Toolset 1.0 is a great way to unlock performance in your team and your software very easily.

And if you’re already a Red Hat Developer Program subscriber, you can install the tools right now. The Red Hat Developer Toolset version 1.1 Beta, released in October 2012,
showcased a good number of additional performance analysis tools. We’re just getting started with this new offering and have plans to include other tools in the future.

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Welcome to the Red Hat developer blog!

I’m writing this first entry at about 30,000 feet on my way back from Red Hat’s North American Partner Conference in San Diego, California. It’s rather appropriate to be typing this out at that altitude, as that is the way I felt for the entire conference after having the opportunity to meet with some amazing ISV, Systems Integrator, VAR and Solution Builder partners who have been building some incredibly powerful solutions using Red Hat technologies. The consistent theme across all of these conversations was making sure that the developers within these organizations had a deep relationship with Red Hat, an understanding of our technology and architecture roadmap as well as the chance to provide more input into how we can all work together.

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Building great APIs, part II: Simplicity, flexibility, and TTFHW

Building great APIs, part II: Simplicity, flexibility, and TTFHW

Last week’s “Building Great APIs” article covered two of John Musser and Adam Duvander’s 5 Key Elements of great APIs: providing value and having a business model. In this post, we’ll tackle the next topic:

  • Make it simpleflexible, and easily adopted.

The three statements seem obvious until you begin to unpick what they mean–and they might even seem contradictory. Making an API simple seems like a noble goal but it can easily be thwarted by complex edge use cases, existing legacy code and a tendency on the part of some API designers to expose underlying data models in raw form. Flexibility often breeds complexity as the API becomes overloaded to meet many use cases. We’ll take each topic in turn and finish up with an all-important metric: TTFHW (Time To First Hello World).

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Building great APIs, part I: The gold standard

Building great APIs, part I: The gold standard

Back in July, John Musser wrote an excellent post over at ProgrammableWeb on what it takes to build great APIs (also check out his OSCON slides on Slideshare). John boils what’s needed down to five key elements—valueplan and business modelflexibilitygood management, and great support.

Together with perhaps just one more–stability (an unreliable API is as good as unusable)–these points arguably should represent an “API Gold Standard” for almost any API program. Getting these right goes a long way to running a great API program and we advise anybody running an API to think about them.

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