Manage your Mongo Databases in RHMAP with Mongo Express

Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) supports an agile approach to developing, integrating, and deploying enterprise mobile applications. Most likely, your mobile apps will include one or more cloud apps which will require persistence support such as a Mongo Database. But managing databases is not always easy, as command line support for this databases is complex and not always available.

To ease this pain, Mongo Express can be used as an database GUI. For the mongo databases in your cloud apps, it is a powerful and intuitive tool which can be used in conjunction or as substitute for the default database browser. The main benefits from using “Mongo Express” instead of “Data Browser” are:

  • Can run complex queries
  • In-depth stats for every view
  • Supports BSON types as TimeStamp() or DBRef()

IMPORTANT: there are some implications when using Mongo Express as a database manager:

  • Mongo Express can only manage the databases in one Cloud App and environment at a time
  • There is no authentication by default when using Mongo Express as explained in this article so take into account all the security issues that this may arise [1]
  • Users running the platform on the RHMAP should upgrade their databases if it was not upgraded before

[1] Check the Annex ‘how to add authentication’ to overcome this issue

Continue reading “Manage your Mongo Databases in RHMAP with Mongo Express”

Getting Started with Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Microsoft announced SQL Server on Linux public preview, so now you can try SQL Server on your Red Hat Enterprise Linux server. I’ll describe how to start SQL Server on RHEL.

Install and connect with CLI on RHEL

Microsoft publishes a step-by-step document how to Install SQL Server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. It’s only 7 steps to install and run.

# systemctl status mssql-server
● mssql-server.service - Microsoft(R) SQL Server(R) Database Engine
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/mssql-server.service; enabled; vendor preset: disabled)
   Active: active (running) since Wed 2016-11-16 20:59:33 EST; 1 weeks 1 days ago
 Main PID: 77982 (sqlservr)
   Memory: 753.6M
   CGroup: /system.slice/mssql-server.service
           ├─77982 /opt/mssql/bin/sqlservr
           └─77997 /opt/mssql/bin/sqlservr

Now you can connect to SQL Server on RHEL. At first, let’s connect with sqlcmd. You should have to install SQL Server tools even if you run sqlcmd on the same host as you installed mssql-server package with following the document. First connect to local SQL Server instance.

Continue reading “Getting Started with Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux”

Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization on OpenShift: Part 3 – Data federation

Welcome to part 3 of Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV) running on OpenShift.

JDV is a lean, virtual data integration solution that unlocks trapped data and delivers it as easily consumable, unified, and actionable information. JDV makes data spread across physically diverse systems such as multiple databases, XML files, and Hadoop systems appear as a set of tables in a local database.

When deployed on OpenShift, JDV enables:

  1. Service enabling your data
  2. Bringing data from outside to inside the PaaS
  3. Breaking up monolithic data sources virtually for a microservices architecture

Together with the JDV for OpenShift image, we have made available several OpenShift templates that allow you to test and bootstrap JDV.

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization on OpenShift: Part 3 – Data federation”

Red Hat Releases New Versions of DevStudio, CDK, and DevSuite

As the interest in container application development continues to grow, so does our expansion of development tools and features.

Today, Red Hat released new versions of the following:

Here’s a listing of the new features:

Continue reading “Red Hat Releases New Versions of DevStudio, CDK, and DevSuite”

Securing Fuse 6.3 Fabric Cluster Management Console with SSL/TLS

Introduction

Enabling SSL/TLS in a Fabric is slightly more complex than securing a jetty in a standalone Karaf container. In the following article, we are providing feedback on the overall process. For clarity and simplification, the article will be divided into two parts.

 

Part1: The Management Console

Part2: Securing Web Service:including gateway-http

 

For the purpose of this PoC, the following environment will be used.

Continue reading “Securing Fuse 6.3 Fabric Cluster Management Console with SSL/TLS”

Spring Cloud for Microservices Compared to Kubernetes

Spring Cloud and Kubernetes both claim to be the best environment for developing and running Microservices, but they are both very different in nature and address different concerns. In this article we will look at how each platform is helping in delivering Microservice based architectures (MSA), in which areas they are good at, and how to take best of both worlds in order to succeed in the Microservices journey.

Background Story

Recently I read a great article about building Microservice Architectures With Spring Cloud and Docker by A. Lukyanchikov. If you haven’t read it, you should, as it gives a comprehensive overview of what it takes to create a simple Microservices based system using Spring Cloud. In order to build a scalable and resilient Microservices system that could grow to tens or hundreds of services, it must be centrally managed and governed with the help of a tool set that has extensive build time and run time capabilities. With Spring Cloud, that involves implementing both functional services (such as statistics service, account service and notification service) and supporting infrastructure services (such as log analysis, configuration server, service discovery, auth service). A diagram describing such a MSA using Spring Cloud is below:

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MSA with Spring Cloud (by A. Lukyanchikov)

Continue reading “Spring Cloud for Microservices Compared to Kubernetes”

Observations on Porting from .NET Framework to .NET Core

You’ve heard that .NET has gone open source. You’ve also heard that it has gone cross-platform. And you’ve even heard that Red Hat is shipping a supported version of .NET on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. So maybe you are thinking to yourself, “wow, this is fantastic! I’m going to copy these EXEs and DLLs of my .NET application over to my Red Hat machine and run them!”

Well, unfortunately, it’s not going to be quite that easy. At least not today.

First and foremost, the open source version of .NET is called “.NET Core.” It is available for many platforms, including Windows and Linux. Those .NET projects and applications that you already have running, however, were built on and for .NET Framework. And .NET Framework and .NET Core are not the same thing; they are more like siblings, which also implies that one is not a subset or child of the other.

“Well, then, what’s the point?!”

The good news is that while they are siblings, they do look a lot alike. Although they’re not identical twins, you’ll definitely recognize them as being from the same immediate family. As such, it is possible to port many existing .NET Framework applications to .NET Core.

“How hard is it to port something?”

Continue reading “Observations on Porting from .NET Framework to .NET Core”

Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization on OpenShift: Part 2 – Service enable your data

Welcome to the part 2 of Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV) running on OpenShift.

JDV is a lean, virtual data integration solution that unlocks trapped data and delivers it as easily consumable, unified, and actionable information. JDV makes data spread across physically diverse systems such as multiple databases, XML files, and Hadoop systems appear as a set of tables in a local database.

When deployed on OpenShift, JDV enables:

  1. Service enabling your data
  2. Bringing data from outside to inside the PaaS
  3. Breaking up monolithic data sources virtually for a microservices architecture

Together with the JDV for OpenShift image, we have made available OpenShift templates that allow you to test and bootstrap JDV.

Introduction

In part 1 we described how to get started with JDV running on OpenShift. During the build phase of the pod several artifacts were downloaded from the provided GitHub URL in the JDV OpenShift template. We deployed two virtual databases (VDBs) called country-ws (external web service-based datasource) and marketdata-file (file-based datasource).

Continue reading “Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization on OpenShift: Part 2 – Service enable your data”

Unlock your MariaDB/MySQL data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization

Welcome back to a new episode of the series: “Unlock your [….] data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization.” Through this blog series, we will look at how to connect Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV) to different and heterogenous data sources.

JDV is a lean, virtual data integration solution that unlocks trapped data and delivers it as easily consumable, unified, and actionable information. It makes data spread across physically diverse systems — such as multiple databases, XML files, and Hadoop systems — appear as a set of tables in a local database. By providing following functionality, JDV enables agile data use:

  1. Connect: Access data from multiple, heterogeneous data sources.
  2. Compose: Easily combine and transform data into reusable, business-friendly virtual data models and views.
  3. Consume: Make unified data easily consumable through open standards interfaces.

It hides complexities, like the true locations of data or the mechanisms required to access or merge it. Data becomes easier for developers and users to work with.

This post will guide you step-by-step how to connect JDV to a MariaDB/MySQL database using Teiid Designer. We will connect to a MariaDB 10.1 server using MySQL Connector/J 5.1, a JDBC driver for communicating with MariaDB/MySQL servers. Indeed, you can follow this same tutorial with a MySQL instance.

Continue reading “Unlock your MariaDB/MySQL data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization”