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More work done with less code – Fuse Online Tech-Preview TODAY

More work done with less code – Fuse Online Tech-Preview TODAY

Fuse Online Tech-Preview is available TODAY! This is great news to my integration developer friends, check out the new Red Hat Fuse Online integration platform. Fuse Online is easy to use and low code platform for system integrators. System integrator now plays a very important role in the Enterprise IT, because they have the ability to interconnect with partner, vendors, and internal systems. Companies now need to deal with the increasing number of APIs/digital touch points that need to weave together. And the time they were given for them to integrate has just gotten shorter! Red Hat Fuse online is just the right tool for this.

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How to configure persistent storage with OpenShift or Kubernetes for development environment

How to configure persistent storage with OpenShift or Kubernetes for development environment

  • We know that containers in Openshift or Kubernetes don’t persist data. Every time we start an application, it is started in a new container with an immutable Docker image.
    Hence, any persisted data in the file systems is lost when the container stops. Hence if an application or container is rebuilt or restarted than we can’t view previous logs or if we are using containers with mysql or any other database then schema, tables, and all data will be lost, if using any messaging broker than if there is journal file than it will also not persist.
    Hence, these ephemeral containers cannot be used in production environment. In a production environment, we must configure a shared storage.
  • But what about the development environment, because we might not always have enough labs and VM’s available. To rescue we have volume type hostPath, which can be easily set up with Minishift and Minikube.
  • This article will provide details how to setup hostPath volume type.

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Low-risk Monolith to Microservice Evolution Part II

Low-risk Monolith to Microservice Evolution Part II

Let’s dive right in! In the previous post (part I), we set up the context for this blog. Basically, as we introduce a strategy to bring microservices to our architecture, we cannot and should not disrupt the current request flows. Our “monolith” applications typically provide a lot of value for the business and we must drive down the risk of negatively affecting these systems as we iterate and expand. This leads us to an often-overlooked fact: when we start to explore a monolith to the microservice journey we’re going to quickly run into the undesirable, sometimes nasty parts that we cannot just wish away. I encourage you to go back and read the first part if you haven’t yet. Also, go read the part about when NOT do microservices.

Follow along (@christianposta) on Twitter for the latest updates and discussion.

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ASP.NET Core Hello World Explained

ASP.NET Core Hello World Explained

Most books teaching C# start with a ‘Hello World’ application. This simple program is used to explain concepts like namespaces, classes, Main and Console.WriteLine. When every line of the code has been dissected, it’s clear how it works.

It’s less obvious for an ASP.NET Core application. We are no longer invoking our code; instead, the ASP.NET Core framework is doing that for us. In this blog post, we’ll look at a simple ASP.NET Core application and explain how ASP.NET Core makes it tick.

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How to start multiple Artemis brokers inside Red Hat JBoss EAP-7 container in Master/Slave fashion

To be as simple as possible, we will walk through a stand-alone use-case.

Usually, when we require having messaging features in our stand-alone environment, we use full profile for EAP container.

If we have a requirement with clustering functionalities then we prefer to have HA profile but if clustering and messaging both are required then we go for a full-HA profile.

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About When Not to Do Microservices

About When Not to Do Microservices

Quick interlude to my last blog. As part of my last blog on low-risk monolith to microservice architecture, I made this statement about microservices and not doing them:

“Microservices architecture is not appropriate all the time”.

I’ve had some interesting reactions. Some of it along the lines of “how dare you”. I also poked at that a bit on Twitter a month or so ago

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Container Images for OpenShift – Part 4: Cloud readiness

Container Images for OpenShift – Part 4: Cloud readiness

This is a transcript of a session I gave at EMEA Red Hat Tech Exchange 2017, a gathering of all Red Hat solution architects and consultants across EMEA. It is about considerations and good practices when creating images that will run on OpenShift. This fourth and last part focuses on the specific aspects of cloud-ready applications and the consequences concerning the design of the container images.

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The NEW API Pattern

Distributed Architectures are a lot like neural networks; all services that talk to each other need to share the I/O in and in a way that they can synchronize that information on the fly. The way the brain does is that each neuron that communicates with another has the other neuron fire back a neurotransmitter to synchronize and improve that communication in the future thus creating a pattern.

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Using New Relic in Red Hat Mobile Node.js Applications

Using New Relic in Red Hat Mobile Node.js Applications

Introduction

New Relic is an application-monitoring platform that provides in-depth analytics and analysis for applications regardless of the type of environment where they are deployed, or as New Relic put it themselves:

“Gain end-to-end visibility across your customer experience, application performance, and dynamic infrastructure with the New Relic Digital Intelligence Platform.” – New Relic

You might ask why there’s a use for New Relic’s monitoring capabilities when Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) and OpenShift Container Platform both offer insights into the CPU, Disk, Memory, and general resource utilization of your server-side applications. While these generic resource reports are valuable, they might not offer the detail required to debug a specific issue. Since New Relic is built as an analytics platform from the ground up it is capable of providing unique insights into the specific runtime of your applications. For example, the JavaScript code deployed in Node.js applications is run using the V8 JavaScript engine which has a life-cycle that can have a significant impact on the performance of your application depending on how you’ve written it. Utilizing New Relic’s Node.js module provides a real-time view of V8 engine performance and how they might be affecting the performance of your production application. By using this data, you can refine your application code to reduce memory usage, which in turn can free CPU resources due to less frequent garbage collections. Neat!

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