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Tips for writing portable assembler with GNU Assembler (GAS)

Tips for writing portable assembler with GNU Assembler (GAS)

Writing assembly code is straightforward when you are familiar with the targeted architecture’s instruction set, but what if you need to write the code for more than one architecture? For example, you might want to test whether a particular assembler feature is available, or generate an object file for use with another tool. Writing assembly source code that can work on multiple architectures is not so simple.

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New and improved Topology view for OpenShift 4.3

New and improved Topology view for OpenShift 4.3

The Topology view in the Red Hat OpenShift console’s Developer perspective is a thoughtfully designed interface that provides a visual representation of an application’s structure. This view helps developers clearly identify one resource type from another, as well as understand the overall communication dynamics within the application. Launched with the 4.2 release of OpenShift, the Topology view has already earned a spotlight in the cloud-native application development arena. The constant feedback cycles and regular follow-ups on the ongoing trends in the developer community have helped to shape up a great experience in the upcoming release. This article focuses on a few showstopper features in the Topology view that were added for OpenShift 4.3.

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4 command-line tools for Kubernetes: Linux edition

4 command-line tools for Kubernetes: Linux edition

In a previous blog post, I detailed how to install four very useful Kubernetes tools on your macOS or Windows machine. Those tools—kubectl, stern, kubectx, and kubens—are must-haves for the advancing developer, as well as any folks in operations. What I failed to do previously, however, was include instructions for installing these tools on Linux. So… here we are.

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Extend Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite through the Service Repository

Extend Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite through the Service Repository

Introduction

Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite offers a really flexible BPMN engine that can be extended with Custom Reusable Services. Most users know them as Work Item Handler (the technical implementation name), but few of them know that it’s possible to expose them in a comfortable list of reusable services. In fact, you can create a repository of services and simplify the life of the BPMN designer that can easily pick and choose the right service.

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Develop and Deploy on OpenShift Online Starter using Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio

Develop and Deploy on OpenShift Online Starter using Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio

The OpenShift Online Starter platform is available for free: visit https://manage.openshift.com/. It is based on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.7. This offering allows you to play with OpenShift Container Platform and deploy artifacts. The purpose of the article is to describe how to use Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio or JBoss Tools together with this online platform.

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Introducing stapbpf – SystemTap’s new BPF backend

Introducing stapbpf – SystemTap’s new BPF backend

SystemTap 3.2 includes an early prototype of SystemTap’s new BPF backend (stapbpf). It represents a first step towards leveraging powerful new tracing and performance analysis capabilities recently added to the Linux kernel. In this post, I will compare the translation process of stapbpf with the default backend (stap) and compare some differences in functionality between these two backends.

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Inter-Reactive Kotlin Applications

Inter-Reactive Kotlin Applications

Kotlin coroutines is one of the major features of Eclipse Vert.x 3.5.

Most of us are used to writing interactive code and going the reactive way is not a trivial paradigm shift for everyone: programming using asynchronous APIs can be more challenging than using a direct synchronous style, in particular, if you have several operations that you want to do in sequence. Also, error propagation is often more complex when using asynchronous APIs.

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