Service Mesh

Introducing Istio Service Mesh for Microservices from O’Reilly Book Release

Introducing Istio Service Mesh for Microservices from O’Reilly Book Release

Burr Sutter (@burrsutter) and I (@christianposta) have finished writing a book called Introducing Istio Service Mesh for Microservices to help folks get up and running with Istio.io service mesh!

Book Cover

Many many thanks to all of the reviewers who took the time to give feedback and to Red Hat for sponsoring my time—especially Burr Sutter and the talented folks at O’Reilly who helped coordinate the effort and make it come to fruition.

Download the Istio Service Mesh for Microservices e-book from O’Reilly

The book covers the following topics:

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Istio Smart Canary Launch: Easing Into Production

Istio Smart Canary Launch: Easing Into Production

First to fall over when the atmosphere is less than perfect

Your sensibilities are shaken by the slightest defect

You live your life like a canary in a coalmine…

When Sting and The Police sang those lyrics, I doubt they had microservices, Istio, Kubernetes, and OpenShift in mind. Yet here we are, years later, using the Canary Deployment pattern to ease code into production.

[This is part eight of my ten-week Introduction to Istio Service Mesh series.  My previous article was Part 7: Istio Dark Launch: Secret Services.]

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Istio Dark Launch: Secret Services

Istio Dark Launch: Secret Services

“Danger is my middle name” is great for spies and people of mystery, but when it comes to deploying software, boring is better. By using Istio with OpenShift and Kubernetes to ease your microservices into production, you can make deployment really, really boring. That’s good.

[This is part seven of my ten-week  Introduction to Istio Service Mesh series series about Istio, Service Mesh, Red hat OpenShift, and Kubernetes. My previous article was Part 6: Istio Chaos Engineering: I Meant to Do That.]

Boring Is Good

Not to worry, dear DevOps person; there are some exciting things in store for you. It’s just that the end result, thankfully, is boring. You want the fun of setting things in motion and then the routine of watching it just work.

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Bringing Coolstore Microservices to the Service Mesh: Part 2–Manual Injection

Bringing Coolstore Microservices to the Service Mesh: Part 2–Manual Injection

Coolstore+Istio Logo

In the first part of this series we explored the Istio project and how Red Hat is committed to and actively involved in the project and working to integrate it into Kubernetes and OpenShift to bring the benefits of a service mesh to our customers and the wider communities involved. If you want to play with Istio, check out the service mesh tutorials on learn.openshift.com. If you want to install it, follow the Istio Kubernetes quickstart instructions and install it on OpenShift 3.7 or later. Also don’t miss Don Schenck’s series of blogs on Istio technology in general to learn more about it and what Red Hat is doing in this space.

In this post, we will deploy the existing Coolstore microservices demo as a service mesh and start to demonstrate the tangible value you can get out of the system without any major rewrite or rearchitecture of the existing app. We’ll also improve our project along the way to adhere to Istio (and general microservice) best practices. In the real world, your applications and developers often make bad assumptions or fail to implement best practices, so with this information you can learn something about your own projects. For Coolstore, many of these workarounds will eventually find their way into the source code of the demo.

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Bringing Coolstore Microservices to the Service Mesh: Part 1 – Exploring Auto-injection

Bringing Coolstore Microservices to the Service Mesh: Part 1 – Exploring Auto-injection

As the industry heads toward the Trough of Disillusionment with cloud-native microservices, finally understanding that distributed architectures introduce more complexity (weird, right?), services meshes can help soften the landing and shift some of that complexity out of our applications and place it where it belongs, in the application operational layer.

At Red Hat we are committed to (and actively involved in) the upstream Istio project and working to integrate it into Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift to bring the benefits of a service mesh to our customers and the wider communities involved. If you want to play with Istio, check out the Service Mesh Tutorials on learn.Openshift.com. If you want to install it, follow the Istio Kubernetes quickstart instructions and install it on Red Hat OpenShift 3.7 or later (or 3.9 if you want to use auto-injection).

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Istio Tracing & Monitoring: Where Are You and How Fast Are You Going?

Istio Tracing & Monitoring: Where Are You and How Fast Are You Going?

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle states that you cannot measure an object’s position and velocity at the same time. If it’s moving, it’s not in a location. If it’s in a location, then it has no velocity.

Thanks to some awesome open-source software, our microservices running in Red Hat OpenShift (using Kubernetes) can report both their performance and their health. Granted, they can’t violate the Uncertainty Principle, but they can help bring certainty to your cloud-native applications. Istio brings tracing and monitoring to your system with very little effort, helping you keep things humming.

[This is part five of my ten-week Introduction to Istio Service Mesh series.  My previous article was Part 4: Istio Circuit Breaker: When Failure Is an Option.]

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Istio Circuit Breaker: When Failure Is an Option

Istio Circuit Breaker: When Failure Is an Option

The phrase “Failure is not an option” is tossed about with much bravado, as though one could make something work by just their strength of will. But the fact remains, things eventually fail. Everything. How then, do you handle the inevitable failure of your microservices? Well, by combining containers, Kubernetes, Red Hat OpenShift, and Istio, we can skip over-the-top displays of swagger, let the system handle things, and get some sleep at night.

[This is part four of my ten-week Introduction to Istio Service Mesh series.  My previous article was Part 3: Istio Circuit Breaker: How to Handle (Pool) Ejection.]

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Istio Route Rules: Telling Service Requests Where to Go

Istio Route Rules: Telling Service Requests Where to Go

OpenShift and Kubernetes do a great job of working to make sure calls to your microservice are routed to the correct pods. After all, that’s one of the raison d’être for Kubernetes: routing and load balancing. What if, however, you want to customize the routing? What if you want to run two versions at the same time? How do Istio Route Rules handle this?

[This is part two of my ten-week Introduction to Istio Service Mesh series.  My previous article was Part 1: Introduction to Istio; It Makes a Mesh of Things. Want to see this in a video? Check out the video edition here.]

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