Serverless

Red Hat Summit: Clouds today, serverless tomorrow

Red Hat Summit: Clouds today, serverless tomorrow

Have you ever thought to yourself, “Today’s world would be so much richer if we had 29 kinds of hummus?” Neither has Stephanos Bacon, Senior Director of Portfolio Strategy for Red Hat Application Platforms. His entertaining presentation moved from the options available to humans hungry for hummus to a discussion of the bewildering array of choices available to developers and architects. Although too many choices can be a bad thing1, it’s important to understand what choices are relevant today and that the relevance of those choices is always shifting.

There are several things that don’t change, however. Some of the concerns that have been with us since before the dawn of time2 include:

  • Making developers as productive as possible
  • Balancing productivity with governance and compliance
  • Delivering software predictably and in a timely manner
  • Making software as robust as possible
  • Prioritizing usability and accessibility

But beyond these goals, there are three factors that are always in flux:

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit: Clouds today, serverless tomorrow”

Share
Red Hat Summit: Containers, Microservices, and Serverless Computing

Red Hat Summit: Containers, Microservices, and Serverless Computing

You’re in an IT department. How does the rest of the organization see you? As a valuable asset whose code and APIs make a difference in the marketplace, or as a necessary evil that should be trimmed as much as possible? Containers, microservices, and serverless computing can make you more responsive, flexible, and competitive, which in turn makes your organization more effective. And that puts you solidly in the asset column.

After sprinting through the streets of San Francisco from the stage of the opening keynote at Red Hat Summit 2018 (replay available here), Burr Sutter hosted a packed house in Moscone South to talk about these technologies. Containers are widely accepted (see the announcement from Red Hat and Microsoft for an example), microservices are increasingly popular as an approach to modernizing monolithic applications, and serverless computing is emerging as an important new programming model.

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit: Containers, Microservices, and Serverless Computing”

Share
State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes (OpenShift Commons Briefing)

State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes (OpenShift Commons Briefing)

If you are interested in serverless computing / Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS), and are not following the OpenShift blog, you should checkout The State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes.  This video is part of the OpenShift Commons Briefing series, which has a lot of great content for developers who interested in cloud-native applications and microservices running on OpenShift and Kubernetes.

FaaS, or serverless as some call it, is a promising compute paradigm suitable for event-driven scenarios. In this briefing, Red Hat’s Michael Hausenblas and Brian Gracely reviewed the current open source offerings for FaaS on Kubernetes (Apache Open Whisk, kubeless, OpenFaaS, etc.) and discussed the pros and cons, on an architectural level and a user experience (UX) point of view. They also covered the topic FaaS vs. containers from a developers as well as an operators perspective.

This talk builds on material gathered by the Serverless Working Group , which is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). CNCF serves as the vendor-neutral home for many of the fastest-growing projects on GitHub, including Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Envoy.

Video, slides, and other resources:

Continue reading “State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes (OpenShift Commons Briefing)”

Share
Whisking Functions with Promises using OpenWhisk

Whisking Functions with Promises using OpenWhisk

Over the past few weeks I have been learning and enhancing my skills around the new buzz word “serverless” and trying to understand what this buzz is all about.  As an ardent open-source developer, I was looking for a platform where I can develop and deploy the serverless functions, which is when I stumbled upon Apache OpenWhisk.

In this blog I will demonstrate how to build a simple nodejs function that can do reverse geocoding using Google Maps API, and how to deploy the functions on to Apache OpenWhisk.

The context is to show building an Apache OpenWhisk JavaScript action, which involves a callback.  As most of us are familiar with Google Maps API (which has lots of callbacks), it provides a good example for this blog.

Continue reading “Whisking Functions with Promises using OpenWhisk”

Share
Red Hat and Apache OpenWhisk

Red Hat and Apache OpenWhisk

Unless you’ve been on a complete media blackout for the last year or so (entirely understandable) you’ve likely heard a lot about Serverless (or FaaS – Function as a Service). Serverless is a major shift in the way developers build and deliver software systems – it greatly simplifies development by insulating the developer from infrastructure concerns and pushes the envelope on cost and efficiency of execution.

Continue reading “Red Hat and Apache OpenWhisk”

Share