Kubernetes

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform expansion pack 1.0 released

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform expansion pack 1.0 released

Red Hat recently released the first Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform expansion pack (JBoss EAP XP) version 1.0. This version enables JBoss EAP developers to build Java microservices using Eclipse MicroProfile 3.3 APIs while continuing to also support Jakarta EE 8. This article goes into detail on the nature of this new offering and an easy way to get started.

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Support for GraphQL with Open Liberty 20.0.0.6

Support for GraphQL with Open Liberty 20.0.0.6

The Open Liberty 20.0.0.6 release brings new features, updates, and bug fixes. This article introduces the new features in Open Liberty 20.0.0.6, including support for developing “code-first” GraphQL applications, provisioning features from a Maven repository, and using a server configuration to control application startup.

What’s new in Open Liberty 20.0.0.6

Open Liberty 20.0.0.6 includes the following feature updates, which I discuss in the next sections:

Note: Visit Open Liberty’s GitHub repository to learn about bug fixes in Open Liberty 20.0.0.6.

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Enterprise Kubernetes development with odo: The CLI tool for developers

Enterprise Kubernetes development with odo: The CLI tool for developers

Kubernetes conversations rarely center the developer’s perspective. As a result, doing our job in a k8s cluster often requires building complicated YAML resource files, writing custom shell scripts, and understanding the countless options that are available in kubectl and docker commands. On top of all of that, we have the learning curve of understanding Kubernetes terminology and using it the way that operations teams do.

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Tracking COVID-19 using Quarkus, AMQ Streams, and Camel K on OpenShift

Tracking COVID-19 using Quarkus, AMQ Streams, and Camel K on OpenShift

In just a matter of weeks, the world that we knew changed forever. The COVID-19 pandemic came swiftly and caused massive disruption to our healthcare systems and local businesses, throwing the world’s economies into chaos. The coronavirus quickly became a crisis that affected everyone. As researchers and scientists rushed to make sense of it, and find ways to eliminate or slow the rate of infection, countries started gathering statistics such as the number of confirmed cases, reported deaths, and so on. Johns Hopkins University researchers have since aggregated the statistics from many countries and made them available.

In this article, we demonstrate how to build a website that shows a series of COVID-19 graphs. These graphs reflect the accumulated number of cases and deaths over a given time period for each country. We use the Red Hat build of Quarkus, Apache Camel K, and Red Hat AMQ Streams to get the Johns Hopkins University data and populate a MongoDB database with it. The deployment is built on the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP).

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Supersonic, Subatomic Java Hackathon: June 15 – July 22 2020

Supersonic, Subatomic Java Hackathon: June 15 – July 22 2020

The Quarkus community is excited to announce the Supersonic, Subatomic Java Hackathon for developers to create Kubernetes-native applications for a chance to win $30,000 in prizes. This hackathon is a great opportunity to learn about the future of cloud-native Java development and showcase your coding skills.

If you are new to Quarkus, don’t worry.  The community will be there to help and support you with a number of enablement sessions (see below) throughout the hackathon including an opening ceremony, weekly office hours, and the DevNation Quarkus Master Course series.

The hackathon will run from Monday, June 15th through Wednesday, July 22nd culminating in a “live” judging and award ceremony on Friday, August 14th.

To register, click here!

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Event streaming and data federation: A citizen integrator’s story

Event streaming and data federation: A citizen integrator’s story

Businesses are seeking to benefit from every customer interaction with real-time personalized experience. Targeting each customer with relevant offers can greatly improve customer loyalty, but we must first understand the customer. We have to be able to draw on data and other resources from diverse systems, such as marketing, customer service, fraud, and business operations. With the advent of modern technologies and agile methodologies, we also want to be able to empower citizen integrators (typically business users who understand business and client needs) to create custom software. What we need is one single functional domain where the information is harmonized in a homogeneous way.

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First look at the new Apicurio Registry UI and Operator

First look at the new Apicurio Registry UI and Operator

Last year, the Apicurio developer community launched the new Apicurio Registry project, which is an API and schema registry for microservices. You can use the Apicurio Registry to store and retrieve service artifacts such as OpenAPI specifications and AsyncAPI definitions, as well as schemas such as Apache Avro, JSON, and Google Protocol Buffers.

Because the registry also works as a catalog where you can navigate through artifacts, adding a new web-based user interface (UI) was a priority for the current Apicurio Registry 1.2.2 release. With this release, the Apicurio community has made the Apicurio Registry available as a binary download or from container images. To make it easier to set up and manage your Apicurio Registry deployment, they have also created a new Kubernetes Operator for the Apicurio Registry.

This article is a quick introduction to the new Apicurio Registry UI and Apicurio Registry Operator. I’ll show you how to access these new features in Apicurio 1.2.2 and describe a few highlights of using them. For a more detailed demonstration, check out my video tutorial introducing the new UI and Kubernetes Operator.

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Extending Red Hat SSO with IBM Security Verify

Extending Red Hat SSO with IBM Security Verify

More and more organizations are using Red Hat Single Sign-On (Red Hat SSO) as the foundation for securing user identities for enterprise and consumer applications. The focus on providing both robust security and a seamless user experience needs to be equally considered. Neither of these requirements should be compromised, especially as applications are being built for a multi-cloud world on Red Hat OpenShift.

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Adding keystores and truststores to microservices in Red Hat OpenShift

Adding keystores and truststores to microservices in Red Hat OpenShift

You might not need Secure Socket Layer (SSL)-based communication between microservices in the same cluster, but it’s often a requirement if you want to connect to a remote web service or message broker. In cases where you will expose a web service or other endpoints, you might also have to use a custom keystore in a microservice deployed on Red Hat OpenShift, so that external clients only connect with a specific truststore.

In this article, I show you how to configure a keystore and a truststore for a Java-based microservice built with Spring Boot. I used the Apache Camel and CXF libraries from Red Hat Fuse to develop the microservice. I used a source-to-image (S2I) deployment and tested the examples in Red Hat OpenShift 4.3.

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Mandrel: A community distribution of GraalVM for the Red Hat build of Quarkus

Mandrel: A community distribution of GraalVM for the Red Hat build of Quarkus

The Java community has demonstrated time and time again its ability to evolve, improve, and adapt to meet the needs of its developers and users. Even after 25 years of language and framework choices, Java has consistently ranked in the top languages in use today due to its strong track record and capabilities in enterprise use cases. Red Hat has long been a strong leader in Java and open source software development and remains committed to being at the forefront of Java as it continues to evolve.

Today, Red Hat and the GraalVM community jointly established a new downstream distribution of GraalVM, called Mandrel. This distribution will power the Red Hat build of Quarkus, a recently announced addition to Red Hat Runtimes. This article explains what Mandrel is and why it is necessary.

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