Kubernetes

HTTP-based Kafka messaging with Red Hat AMQ Streams

HTTP-based Kafka messaging with Red Hat AMQ Streams

Apache Kafka is a rock-solid, super-fast, event streaming backbone that is not only for microservices. It’s an enabler for many use cases, including activity tracking, log aggregation, stream processing, change-data capture, Internet of Things (IoT) telemetry, and more.

Red Hat AMQ Streams makes it easy to run and manage Kafka natively on Red Hat OpenShift. AMQ Streams’ upstream project, Strimzi, does the same thing for Kubernetes.

Setting up a Kafka cluster on a developer’s laptop is fast and easy, but in some environments, the client setup is harder. Kafka uses a TCP/IP-based proprietary protocol and has clients available for many different programming languages. Only the JVM client is on Kafka’s main codebase, however.

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How to fix .NET Core’s ‘Unable to obtain lock file access’ error on Red Hat OpenShift

How to fix .NET Core’s ‘Unable to obtain lock file access’ error on Red Hat OpenShift

Well, it finally happened. Despite the added assurances of working with containers and Kubernetes, the old “It works on my machine” scenario reared its ugly head in my .NET Core (C#) code. The image that I created worked fine on my local PC—a Fedora 32 machine—but it crashed when I tried running it in my Red Hat OpenShift cluster.

The error was “Unable to obtain lock file access on /tmp/NuGetScratch.” Let’s take a quick look at what happened, and then I’ll explain how I fixed it.

Identity issues

After a lot of web searching and a discussion with a Red Hat .NET Core engineer, I discovered the underlying problem. It turns out that within a container, the identity used to initially run the program (using the dotnet run command) must be the same for subsequent users.

The problem might be easy to understand, but what’s the solution?

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Creating event sources in the OpenShift 4.5 web console

Creating event sources in the OpenShift 4.5 web console

Red Hat OpenShift 4.5 makes it easier than ever to deploy and run event-driven applications that react to real-time information via event notifications. Empowered by OpenShift Serverless, applications come to life through events, scaling up resources as needed (or up to a pre-configured limit), and then scaling back to zero after the resource burst is over.

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Deploy your Java web application into the cloud using Eclipse JKube

Deploy your Java web application into the cloud using Eclipse JKube

Before we had Spring Boot and similar frameworks, a web app container was the main requirement for deploying Java web applications. We now live in the age of microservices, and many Java applications are developed on top of Quarkus, Thorntail, or Spring Boot. But some use cases still require an old-school web application.

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Open Data Hub and Kubeflow installation customization

Open Data Hub and Kubeflow installation customization

The main goal of Kubernetes is to reach the desired state: to deploy our pods, set up the network, and provide storage. This paradigm extends to Operators, which use custom resources to define the state. When the Operator picks up the custom resource, it will always try to get to the state defined by it. That means that if we modify a resource that is managed by the Operator, it will quickly replace it to match the desired state.

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New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.16.0.Final for Eclipse 2020-06

New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.16.0.Final for Eclipse 2020-06

JBoss Tools 4.16.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16 for Eclipse 4.16 (2020-06) are now available. For this release, we focused on improving Quarkus– and container-based development and fixing bugs. We also updated the Hibernate Tools runtime provider and Java Developer Tools (JDT) extensions, which are now compatible with Java 14. Additionally, we made many changes to platform views, dialogs, and toolbars in the user interface (UI).

This article is an overview of what’s new in JBoss Tools 4.16.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16 for Eclipse 4.16 (2020-06).

Installation

First, let’s look at how to install these updates. CodeReady Studio (previously Red Hat Developer Studio) comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Simply download the installer from the Red Hat CodeReady Studio product page and run it as follows:

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Best practices: Using health checks in the OpenShift 4.5 web console

Best practices: Using health checks in the OpenShift 4.5 web console

For an enterprise application to succeed, you need many moving parts to work correctly. If one piece breaks, the system must be able to detect the issue and operate without that component until it is repaired. Ideally, all of this should happen automatically. In this article, you will learn how to use health checks to improve application reliability and uptime in Red Hat OpenShift 4.5. If you want to learn more about what’s new and updated in OpenShift 4.5, read What’s new in the OpenShift 4.5 console developer experience.

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