DevOps

WildFly server configuration with Ansible collection for JCliff, Part 2

WildFly server configuration with Ansible collection for JCliff, Part 2

Welcome to the second part of this series introducing Ansible collection for JCliff. This new extension is designed for fine-tuning WildFly or Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) configurations using Ansible. In Part 1, we installed JCliff and its Ansible collection and prepared our environment. We set up a minimal, working playbook for installing JCliff on the target system. In this article, we will focus on configuring a few of our WildFly server’s subsystems.

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New developer onboarding features in Red Hat OpenShift 4.6

New developer onboarding features in Red Hat OpenShift 4.6

We’ve added new features in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 release to help developers get started faster with the OpenShift web console:

  • The default developer perspective is set based on your permissions.
  • The developer perspective includes a guided tour.
  • Quick starts guide you through common user flows.
  • Samples make it easy to deploy new applications on OpenShift.

Keep reading to learn about these new features to improve developer onboarding with the OpenShift web console in OpenShift 4.6.

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Jakarta EE: Multitenancy with JPA on WildFly, Part 2

Jakarta EE: Multitenancy with JPA on WildFly, Part 2

This is the second half of a two-part article about multitenancy with the Jakarta Persistence API (JPA) on WildFly. In Part 1, I showed you how to implement multitenancy using a database. In Part 2, I’ll show you how to implement multitenancy using a schema and the Jakarta Persistence API (JPA) on WildFly. You’ll learn how to implement JPA’s CurrentTenantIdentifierResolver and MultiTenantConnectionProvider interfaces, and how to use JPA’s persistence.xml file to configure the required classes based on these interfaces.

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WildFly server configuration with Ansible collection for JCliff, Part 1

WildFly server configuration with Ansible collection for JCliff, Part 1

This three-part series guides you through using Ansible to fine-tune a WildFly or Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) server configuration. We will use the most recently released version of the Ansible collection for JCliff to extend Ansible’s capabilities. The JCliff collection supports configuring several of the application server subsystems directly from Ansible.

In Part 1, we will mostly focus on the groundwork and discuss all the steps required to be able to use JCliff within Ansible. Once properly installed, we’ll use JCliff to configure WildFly’s system_props subsystem, which lets us declare system variables in the WildI guesFly server configuration. Once we have that foundation in place, we’ll begin exploring more interesting configurations in Part 2 and Part 3.

Note: See the Ansible documentation for more about Ansible collections.

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Persistent storage in action: Understanding Red Hat OpenShift’s persistent volume framework

Persistent storage in action: Understanding Red Hat OpenShift’s persistent volume framework

Red Hat OpenShift is an enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform that provides a number of different models you can use to deploy an application. OpenShift 4.x uses Operators to deploy Kubernetes-native applications. It also supports Helm and traditional template-based deployments. Whatever deployment method you choose, it will be deployed as a wrapper to one or more existing OpenShift resources. Examples include BuildConfig, DeploymentConfig, and ImageStream.

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Let’s collaborate! Take the 2020 Red Hat OpenShift Developer Survey now

Let’s collaborate! Take the 2020 Red Hat OpenShift Developer Survey now

We are always looking for ways to understand better how developers create, build, manage, test, and deploy applications on and for Red Hat OpenShift. An important part of that effort is the annual OpenShift Developer Survey, which we’ve just released for 2020.

Keep reading to learn more about the survey, including highlights of the 2019 survey results and what to expect from the survey this year. We also invite you to participate in our OpenShift developer experience office hours and one-to-one feedback sessions for our developer community and customers.

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Building modern CI/CD workflows for serverless applications with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines and Argo CD, Part 2

Building modern CI/CD workflows for serverless applications with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines and Argo CD, Part 2

In the first half of this article, I introduced Tekton as a framework for cloud-native CI/CD pipelines, and Argo CD as its perfect partner for GitOps on Red Hat OpenShift. Our example for the demonstration is a Knative service that deploys and serves a Quarkus application. Our goal is to develop a complete continuous integration and delivery process, which begins when a commit is initiated in the application’s GitHub repository and ends with the new application version deployed in the development, staging, and production environments.

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Static analysis with KubeAudit for Red Hat OpenShift

Static analysis with KubeAudit for Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, we introduce a new utility for developers who want to ensure that their code transitions cleanly from upstream Kubernetes to Red Hat OpenShift. OpenShiftKubeAudit (KubeAudit) is a static analyzer that semantically checks a user’s code for known incompatibilities so you can fix them before bringing the code into OpenShift. KubeAudit is also simple to use and easy to extend.

Running an audit

This being the first release, KubeAudit currently offers only a handful of audits, but they’re easy to write. We’re looking for feedback and additional use cases from the community to help make the tool more comprehensive.

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