Containers

CodeReady Workspaces devfile, demystified

CodeReady Workspaces devfile, demystified

With the exciting advent of CodeReady Workspaces (CRW) 2.0 comes some important changes. Based on the upstream project Eclipse Che 7, CRW brings even more of the “Infrastructure as Code” idea to fruition. Workspaces mimic the environment of a PC, an operating system, programming language support, the tools needed, and an editor. The real power comes by defining a workspace using a YAML file—a text file that can be stored and versioned in a source control system such as Git. This file, called devfile.yaml, is powerful and complex. This article will attempt to demystify the devfile.

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Building freely distributed containers with Podman and Red Hat UBI

Building freely distributed containers with Podman and Red Hat UBI

DevNation tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about building containers with Podman and Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) from Scott McCarty and Burr Sutter.

We will cover how to build and run containers based on UBI using just your regular user account—no daemon, no root, no fuss. Finally, we will order the de-resolution of all of our containers with a really cool command. After this talk, you will have new tools at the ready to help you find, run, build, and share container images.

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Open Liberty Java runtime now available to Red Hat Runtimes subscribers

Open Liberty Java runtime now available to Red Hat Runtimes subscribers

Open Liberty is a lightweight, production-ready Java runtime for containerizing and deploying microservices to the cloud, and is now available as part of a Red Hat Runtimes subscription. If you are a Red Hat Runtimes subscriber, you can write your Eclipse MicroProfile and Jakarta EE apps on Open Liberty and then run them in containers on Red Hat OpenShift, with commercial support from Red Hat and IBM.

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Pod Lifecycle Event Generator: Understanding the “PLEG is not healthy” issue in Kubernetes

Pod Lifecycle Event Generator: Understanding the “PLEG is not healthy” issue in Kubernetes

In this article, I’ll explore the “PLEG is not healthy” issue in Kubernetes, which sometimes leads to a “NodeNotReady” status. When understanding how the Pod Lifecycle Event Generator (PLEG) works, it is helpful to also understand troubleshooting around this issue.

What is PLEG?

The PLEG module in kubelet (Kubernetes) adjusts the container runtime state with each matched pod-level event and keeps the pod cache up to date by applying changes.

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Verifying signatures of Red Hat container images

Verifying signatures of Red Hat container images

Security-conscious organizations are accustomed to using digital signatures to validate application content from the Internet. A common example is RPM package signing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) validates signatures of RPM packages by default.

In the container world, a similar paradigm should be adhered to. In fact, all container images from Red Hat have been digitally signed and have been for several years. Many users are not aware of this because early container tooling was not designed to support digital signatures.

In this article, I’ll demonstrate how to configure a container engine to validate signatures of container images from the Red Hat registries for increased security of your containerized applications.

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Using a MySQL database in your Red Hat OpenShift application

Using a MySQL database in your Red Hat OpenShift application

Creating a MySQL database in Red Hat OpenShift is useful for developers, there’s no doubt about that. But, once the database is ready, with tables and data, how do you use the data in your application? Is there some special magic when using Red Hat OpenShift? What about the fact that pod names can change? This article will walk you through the steps necessary to access a MySQL database that is running in your OpenShift cluster.

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3 steps toward improving container security

3 steps toward improving container security

As developers increasingly make use of containers, securing them becomes more and more important. Gartner has named container security one of its top 10 concerns for this year in this report, which isn’t surprising given their popularity in producing lightweight and reusable code and lowering app dev costs.

In this article, I’ll look at the three basic steps involved in container security: securing the build environment, securing the underlying container hosts, and securing the actual content that runs inside each container. To be successful at mastering container security means paying attention to all three of these elements.

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CI/CD for .NET Core container applications on Red Hat OpenShift

CI/CD for .NET Core container applications on Red Hat OpenShift

Many people have done continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) for .NET Core, but they still may wonder how to implement this process in Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP). The information is out there, but it has not been structurally documented. In this article, we’ll walk through the process.

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