CI/CD

Open Data Hub 0.6.1: Bug fix release to smooth out redesign regressions

Open Data Hub 0.6.1: Bug fix release to smooth out redesign regressions

It is just a few short weeks since we released Open Data Hub (ODH) 0.6.0, bringing many changes to the underlying architecture and some new features. We found a few issues in this new version with the Kubeflow Operator and a few regressions that came in with the new JupyterHub updates. To make sure your experience with ODH 0.6 does not suffer because we wanted to release early, we offer a new (mostly) bugfix release: Open Data Hub 0.6.1.

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How the fabric8 Maven plug-in deploys Java applications to OpenShift

How the fabric8 Maven plug-in deploys Java applications to OpenShift

The fabric8 Maven plug-in, often abbreviated FMP, can be added to a Maven Java project and takes care of the administrative tasks involved in deploying the application to a Red Hat OpenShift cluster. These tasks include:

  1. Creating an OpenShift build configuration (BC).
  2. Coordinating the source-to-image (S2I) process to create a container image from the application’s compiled bytecode.
  3. Creating and instantiating a deployment configuration (DC) from information in the project.
  4. Defining and instantiating OpenShift services and routes.

All of the relevant components of this process are well-documented individually. This article pulls together documentation sources to create an overview of how the plug-in works, and the structure of the image it generates—which might make the plug-in easier to use and troubleshoot.

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Getting started with the fabric8 Kubernetes Java client

Getting started with the fabric8 Kubernetes Java client

Fabric8 has been available as a Java client for Kubernetes since 2015, and today is one of the most popular client libraries for Kubernetes. (The most popular is client-go, which is the client library for the Go programming language on Kubernetes.) In recent years, fabric8 has evolved from a Java client for the Kubernetes REST API to a full-fledged alternative to the kubectl command-line tool for Java-based development.

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Deploy and bind enterprise-grade microservices with Kubernetes Operators

Deploy and bind enterprise-grade microservices with Kubernetes Operators

Deploying enterprise-grade runtime components into Kubernetes can be daunting. You might wonder:

  • How do I fetch a certificate for my app?
  • What’s the syntax for autoscaling resources with the Horizontal Pod Autoscaler?
  • How do I link my container with a database and with a Kafka cluster?
  • Are my metrics going to Prometheus?
  • Also, how do I scale to zero with Knative?

Operators can help with all of those needs and more. In this article, I introduce three Operators—Runtime Component Operator, Service Binding Operator, and Open Liberty Operator—that work together to help you deploy containers like a pro.

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Using Ansible to automate Google Cloud Platform

Using Ansible to automate Google Cloud Platform

In this article, you will learn how to seamlessly automate the provisioning of Google Cloud Platform (GCP) resources using the new Red Hat Ansible modules and your Red Hat Ansible Tower credentials.

About the new GCP modules

Starting with Ansible 2.6, Red Hat has partnered with Google to ship a new set of modules for automating Google Cloud Platform resource management. The partnership has resulted in more than 100 GCP modules and a consistent naming scheme of gcp_*. While we still have access to the original modules, developers are recommended to use the newer modules whenever possible.

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Serverless applications made faster and simpler with OpenShift Serverless GA

Serverless applications made faster and simpler with OpenShift Serverless GA

Red Hat OpenShift Serverless delivers Kubernetes-native, event-driven primitives for microservices, containers, and compatible Function-as-a-Service (FaaS) implementations. OpenShft Serverless provides out-of-the-box traffic routing and security capabilities. This offering combines Red Hat Operators, Knative, and Red Hat OpenShift. Combined, these tools allow stateless and serverless workloads to run across OpenShift deployments on private, public, hybrid, or multi-cloud environments with automated operations.

OpenShift Serverless is now generally available. It enables developers to focus purely on building next-generation applications with a wide choice of languages, frameworks, development environments, and other tools for writing and deploying business-differentiating applications.

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What’s new in the OpenShift 4.4 web console developer experience

What’s new in the OpenShift 4.4 web console developer experience

The developer experience in the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform web console keeps getting better. You’ve probably already heard about our streamlined user flows to build and deploy applications, plus the ability to understand the structure of your application via the Topology view. Each new release of Red Hat OpenShift includes usability improvements and new features to help developers reach their goals.

In OpenShift 4.4, we focused on making application deployment easier through the Developer Catalog, improving the experience of Operator-backed services, and supporting Helm Charts. As for feature updates, we:

  • Made a number of topology enhancements to help streamline discoverability and scalability.
  • Introduced an application monitoring section.
  • Introduced a new Pipeline Builder.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift, Part 4: Openshift Pipelines

Modern web applications on OpenShift, Part 4: Openshift Pipelines

When I wrote part 3 of this series, Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — OpenShift as a development environment, I said that was the final part. However, there is new tech that fits in very nicely with deploying modern Web Applications to OpenShift, so part 4 is necessary. As a refresher, in the first article, we looked at how to deploy a modern web application using the fewest commands. In the second part, we took a deeper look into how the new source-to-image (S2I) web app builder works and how to use it as part of a chained build. In the third, we took a look at how to run your app’s “development workflow” on Red Hat OpenShift. This article talks about OpenShift Pipelines and how this tool can be used as an alternative to a chained build.

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Migrating applications to OpenShift, Part 1: Overview

Migrating applications to OpenShift, Part 1: Overview

I help teams migrate their applications onto Red Hat OpenShift, so I can’t help but notice patterns and considerations that arise regarding the migration process. Such operations have many domain-specific factors, but in regards to getting the applications up and running on OpenShift, there appear to be several common patterns that teams use to migrate successfully.

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