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July 19th DevNation Live: Container pipeline master: Continuous integration + continuous delivery with Jenkins

Join us for the next online DevNation Live on Thursday, July 19th at 12pm EDT for Container pipeline master: Continuous integration + continuous delivery with Jenkins, presented by Red Hat principal technical product marketing manager for Red Hat OpenShift, Siamak Sadeghianfar.

In this session, we’ll take a detailed look into how you can build a super slick, automated continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) Jenkins pipeline that delivers your application payloads onto the enterprise Kubernetes platform, Red Hat OpenShift. You see how zero-downtime deployment patterns can be part of your release process when you are using a container platform based on Kubernetes.

Automating your build, test, and deployment processes can improve reliability and reduce the need for rollbacks. However, we’ll show you how rollbacks can be handled too.

Register now and join the live presentation at 12pm EDT, Thursday, July 19th.

Session Agenda:

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A Beginner’s Guide to Kubernetes (PodCTL Podcast #38)

If you aren’t following the OpenShift Blog, you might not be aware of the PodCTL podcast. It’s a free weekly tech podcast covering containers, kubernetes, and OpenShift hosted by Red Hat’s Brian Gracely (@bgracely) and Tyler Britten (@vmtyler). I’m reposting this episode here on the Red Hat Developer Blog because I think their realization is spot on—while early adopters might be deep into Kubernetes, many are just starting and could benefit from some insights.

Original Introduction from blog.openshift.com:

The Kubernetes community now has 10 releases (2.5 yrs) of software and experience. We just finished KubeCon Copenhagen, OpenShift Commons Gathering, and Red Hat Summit and we heard lots of companies talk about their deployments and journeys. But many of them took a while (12–18) months to get to where they are today. This feels like the “early adopters” and we’re beginning to get to the “crossing the chasm” part of the market. So thought we’d discuss some of the basics, lessons learned, and other things people could use to “fast-track” what they need to be successful with Kubernetes.

The podcast will always be available on the Red Hat OpenShift blog (search: #PodCTL), as well as on RSS FeedsiTunesGoogle PlayStitcherTuneIn, and all your favorite podcast players.

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Why Kubernetes is The New Application Server

Have you ever wondered why you are deploying your multi-platform applications using containers? Is it just a matter of “following the hype”? In this article, I’m going to ask some provocative questions to make my case for Why Kubernetes is the new application server.

You might have noticed that the majority of languages are interpreted and use “runtimes” to execute your source code. In theory, most Node.js, Python, and Ruby code can be easily moved from one platform (Windows, Mac, Linux) to another platform. Java applications go even further by having the compiled Java class turned into a bytecode, capable of running anywhere that has a JVM (Java Virtual Machine).

The Java ecosystem provides a standard format to distribute all Java classes that are part of the same application. You can package these classes as a JAR (Java Archive), WAR (Web Archive), and EAR (Enterprise Archive) that contains the front end, back end, and libraries embedded. So I ask you: Why do you use containers to distribute your Java application? Isn’t it already supposed to be easily portable between environments?

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DesOps is “DevOps 2.0”

As we discussed in the last post, most of DevOps today focuses on the process blocks that mostly impact engineering or technical aspects of a product rather than the design aspect. Even though  DesOps was primarily born out of the primary need of how to design at scale, the factors that shaped it are of a similar nature to the factors that shaped DevOps.

With recent software delivery processes, for example, the Agile process and Continuous Integration (CI) and Continuous Deployment (CD)of code, the DevOps approach provided a faster highway to ensure faster delivery with low risks. So the earlier SDLC model got redefined over time with Agile and then with DevOps to its current shape.

However, because design is an integral part of any product delivered, there is a need to ensure that gaps are bridged between the traditional design lifecycle and the fast track of the DevOps development lifecycle. DesOps and DevOps both are complementary to each other. The design delivery process improvements try to optimize the overall delivery process and thereby contribute to DevOps, for example, in aspects such as testing of the product that involves design aspects, usability, accessibility, etc.

The need for tighter integration between the design team and the engineering team became a necessity to ensure to design at scale. During the past two to three years, the top five big companies have made heavy investments in this area that have paved the way for other organizations and design communities to be more explorative in this area.

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DesOps – The Next Wave in Design

DesOps, aka. DesignOps, refers to an approach to design that is inspired by the culture of DevOps. In this and the following posts, we will explore, the practical approaches for

  • How to prepare for the next wave in design that compliments the DevOps concepts of a cultural shift, collaboration, and automation.
  • We will also see what solutions are available today that contribute to bringing the full circle of design in the context of the software development lifecycle.

Today, design as a discipline is getting more and more recognition across the entrepreneur world and many industry efforts, such as IBM‘s Enterprise Design Thinking framework, RedHat‘s Open Studio and similar ones, are at a large scale, trying to create a synergy between the Agile approach to the software development lifecycle and the Design Thinking.  It is an interesting crossroad where the next big thing in product delivery is to bring scalability as well as automation to the creative process.

In the context of the software industry, I always see “design” as an intersection between creativity and technology where both shape each other—with help from user needs—and blend the results into successful products.

Any typical software product that is delivered involves many complex as well as divergent technologies, processes, people, and visions. Though software delivery mostly happens with team members segmented into two major groups—developers and designers—ultimately, the best outcome always depends on how the two teams communicate with each other and how efficiently their thoughts and ideas are shared, propagated, and translated.

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Next DevNation Live: Advanced Microservices Tracing with Jaeger, June 21st, 12pm EDT

A significant challenge of moving from a traditional monolithic application design to a microservices-based architecture is the ability to monitor the business transaction flow of events throughout your entire distributed system. Join us for the next online DevNation Live on June 21st at 12pm EDT for Advanced Microservices Tracing with Jaeger, presented by Red Hat software engineers Pavol Loffay and Juraci Paixão Kröehling.

In this session, we’ll examine in detail the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) OpenTracing API, a consistent, expressive, vendor-neutral API for distributed tracing and context propagation. We will also analyse Jaeger, an open source distributed tracing system inspired by Google Dapper and OpenZipkin.

Join us to gain an understanding of Jaeger’s open source distributed tracing system and how it can help you monitor and troubleshoot microservices-based distributed systems.

Watch the video of the recorded session:

Session Agenda

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Announcing .NET Core 2.1 for Red Hat Platforms

We are very pleased to announce the general availability of .NET Core 2.1 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenShift platforms!

.NET Core is the open-source, cross-platform .NET platform for building microservices. .NET Core is designed to provide the best performance at scale for applications that use microservices and containers. Libraries can be shared with other .NET platforms, such as .NET Framework (Windows) and Xamarin (mobile applications). With .NET Core you have the flexibility of building and deploying applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux or in containers. Your container-based applications and microservices can easily be deployed to your choice of public or private clouds using Red Hat OpenShift. All of the features of OpenShift and Kubernetes for cloud deployments are available to you.

.NET Core 2.1 continues to broaden its support and tools for microservice development in an open source environment. The latest version of .NET Core includes the following improvements:

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Building Container-Native Node.js Applications with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes and Istio

For developers working on a Kubernetes-based application environment such as Red Hat OpenShift, there are a number things that need to be considered to fully take advantage of the significant benefits provided by these technologies, including:

  • How do I communicate with the orchestration layer to indicate the application is operating correctly and is available to receive traffic?
  • What happens if the application detects a system fault, and how does the application relay this to the orchestration layer?
  • How can I accurately trace traffic flow between my applications in order to identify potential bottlenecks?
  • What tools can I use to easily deploy my updated application as part of my standard toolchain?
  • What happens if I introduce a network fault between my services, and how do I test this scenario?

These questions are central to building container-native solutions. At Red Hat, we define container-native as applications that conform to the following key tenets:

  • DevOps automation
  • Single concern principle
  • Service discovery
  • High observability
  • Lifecycle conformance
  • Runtime confinement
  • Process disposability
  • Image immutability

This may seem like a lot of overhead on top of the core application logic. Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) and Istio provide developers with tools to adhere to these principles with minimal overhead in terms of coding and implementation.

In this blog post, we’re specifically focusing on how RHOAR and Istio combine to provide tools for DevOps automation, lifecycle conformance, high observability, and runtime confinement.

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Next DevNation Live: Your Journey to a Serverless World—An Introduction to Serverless, June 7th, 12pm EDT

Join us for the next online DevNation Live on June 7th at 12pm EDT for Your Journey to a Serverless World—An Introduction to Serverless, presented by Kamesh Sampath and hosted by Burr Sutter.  Serverless computing is an emerging architecture that represents a shift in the way developers build and deliver software systems. By removing application infrastructure concerns, development and deployment are simplified, allowing developers to focus on writing code that delivers value.  Additionally, operational costs can be reduced by only consuming resources when needed to respond to application events.

In this session, we’ll learn what serverless is and what it means to a developer. Then, we’ll quickly deploy a serverless platform using Apache OpenWhisk on Kubernetes. Using this platform, we’ll demystify which Java™ programming model you should use in a serverless environment. And finally, we’ll look at tools that can make your serverless journey quick, easy, and productive.

Watch the recorded session and view the slides.

Session Agenda

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How to install Python Flask on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

I recently got my zero-dollar developer copy of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL, version 7.5) and built a virtual machine (VM) to run it. There it was, on my PC, running in VirtualBox…a gleaming, shiny, brand-spanking-new VM running RHEL. Whatever shall I do with it?

Then I got the idea: I’ll install the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) and build some Python-based containers. I’ll use Flask, a terrific microframework that makes building RESTful services easy.

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