Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — Openshift as a development environment

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 3 — Openshift as a development environment

Welcome back to the final part of this multipart series about deploying modern web applications on Red Hat OpenShift. In the first post, we took a look at how to deploy a modern web application using the fewest commands.

In the second part, we took a deeper look into how the new source-to-image (S2I) web app builder works and how to use it as part of a chained build.

This third and final part will take a look at how you can run your app’s “development workflow” on OpenShift.

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Monitoring Node.js Applications on OpenShift with Prometheus

Monitoring Node.js Applications on OpenShift with Prometheus

Observability is Key

One of the great things about Node.js is how well it performs in a container. Its fast start up time, and relatively small size make it a favorite for microservice applications on OpenShift. But with this shift to containerized deployments comes some complexity. As a result, monitoring Node.js applications can be difficult. At times it seems as though the performance and behavior of our applications become opaque to us. So what can we do to find and address issues in our services before they become a problem? We need to enhance observability by monitoring the state of our services.

Instrumentation

Instrumentation of our applications is one way to increase observability. Therefore, in this article, I will demonstrate the instrumentation of a Node.js application using Prometheus.

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Using Kubernetes readiness and liveness probes for health checks with ASP.NET Core 2.2 on OpenShift

Using Kubernetes readiness and liveness probes for health checks with ASP.NET Core 2.2 on OpenShift

.NET Core 2.2 has been released. You can try it on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and OpenShift. One of the new features of ASP.NET Core is the Health Checks API.

In this article, which was written for C# Advent Calendar 2018, I show an example of how the API works with OpenShift by implementing two health checks for the Kubernetes liveness and readiness probes. Since OpenShift includes Kubernetes, this example also works well with Kubernetes.

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Building Java 11 and Gradle containers for OpenShift

Building Java 11 and Gradle containers for OpenShift

How do YOU get your Java apps running in a cloud?

First you grab a cloud from the sky by, for example,  (1) Getting started with a free account on Red Hat OpenShift Online, or (2) locally on your laptop using Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) or upstream Minishift on Windows, macOS, and Linux, or (3) using oc cluster up (only on Linux), or (4) by obtaining a login from someone running Red Hat OpenShift on a public or on-premises cloud. Then, you download the oc CLI client tool probably for Windows (and put it on your PATH). Then you select the Copy Login Command from the menu in the upper right corner under your name in the OpenShift Console’s UI, and you use, for example, the oc status command.

Great—now you just need to containerize your Java app. You could, of course, start to write your own Dockerfile, pick an appropriate container base image (and discuss Red Hat Enterprise Linux versus CentOS versus Fedora versus Ubuntu versus Debian versus Alpine with your co-workers; and, especially if you’re in an enterprise environment, figure out how to have that supported in production), figure out appropriate JVM startup parameters for a container, add monitoring, and so.

But perhaps what you really wanted to do today is…well, just get your Java app running in a cloud!

Read on to find an easier way.

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Processing CloudEvents with Eclipse Vert.x

Processing CloudEvents with Eclipse Vert.x

Our connected world is full of events that are triggered or received by different software services. One of the big issues is that event publishers tend to describe events differently and in ways that are mostly incompatible with each other.

To address this, the Serverless Working Group from the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) recently announced version 0.2 of the CloudEvents specification. The specification aims to describe event data in a common, standardized way. To some degree, a CloudEvent is an abstract envelope with some specified attributes that describe a concrete event and its data.

Working with CloudEvents is simple. This article shows how to use the powerful JVM toolkit provided by Vert.x to either generate or receive and process CloudEvents.

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Announcing the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code: Public Preview

Announcing the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code: Public Preview

We are extremely pleased to announce that the preview release of the Red Hat OpenShift extension for Visual Studio Code is now available. You can download the OpenShift Connector extension from the marketplace or install it directly from the extension gallery in Visual Studio Code.

This article provides describes the features and benefits of the extension and provides installation details. It also provides a demo of how using the extension improves the end-to-end experience of developing and deploying Spring Boot applications to local OpenShift cluster.

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Extending support to Spring Boot for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Extending support to Spring Boot for Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

What Red Hat is providing

Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR) is a recommended set of products, tools, and components for developing and maintaining cloud-native applications on the Red Hat OpenShift platform. As part of this offering, Red Hat is extending its support to Spring Boot and related frameworks for building modern, production-grade, Java-based cloud-native applications.

Spring Boot lets you create opinionated Spring-based standalone applications. The Spring Boot runtime also integrates with the OpenShift platform, allowing your services to externalize their configuration, implement health checks, provide resiliency and failover, and much more. To learn more about how Spring Boot applications integrate with the wider Red Hat portfolio, check out the following OpenShift Commons Briefing by Thomas Qvarnstrom:

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Upcoming Book: Vert.x in Action (MEAP)

Upcoming Book: Vert.x in Action (MEAP)

I am pleased to announce that my upcoming book “Vert.x in Action: Asynchronous and Reactive Applications in Java” is now available from the Manning early-access program (MEAP): (See below for the exclusive Red Hat Developer discount code)

As enterprise applications become larger and more distributed, new architectural approaches like reactive designs, microservices, and event streams are required knowledge. The Eclipse Vert.x framework provides a mature, rock-solid toolkit for building reactive applications using Java, Kotlin, or Scala. Vert.x in Action teaches you to build responsive, resilient, and scalable JVM applications with Vert.x using well-established reactive design patterns.

Vert.x in Action teaches you to build highly-scalable reactive enterprise applications. In this practical developer’s guide, Vert.x expert Julien Ponge gets you up to speed in the basics of asynchronous programming as you learn to design and code reactive applications. Using the Vert.x asynchronous APIs, you’ll build services including web stack, messaging, authentication, and access control. You’ll also dive into deployment of container-native components with Docker, Kubernetes, and OpenShift. Along the way, you’ll check your app’s health and learn to test its resilience to external service failures.

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Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

Modern web applications on OpenShift: Part 2 — Using chained builds

In the previous article, we took a quick look at a new source-to-image (S2I) builder image designed for building and deploying modern web applications on OpenShift. While the last article was focused on getting your app deployed quickly, this article will look at how to use the S2I image as a “pure” builder image and combine it with an OpenShift chained build.

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Announcing: Thorntail 2.2 General Availability

Announcing: Thorntail 2.2 General Availability

An Introduction to Thorntail

Today Red Hat is making Thorntail 2.2 generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Thorntail is the new name for WildFly Swarm, and bundles everything you need to develop and run Thorntail and MicroProfile applications by packaging server runtime libraries with your application code and running it with java -jar. It speeds up the transition from monoliths to microservices and takes advantage of your existing industry standard Java EE technology experience.

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