Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage

Red Hat support for Node.js

Red Hat support for Node.js

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For the past two years, Red Hat Middleware has provided a supported Node.js runtime on Red Hat OpenShift as part of Red Hat Runtimes. Our goal has been to provide rapid releases of the upstream Node.js core project, example applications to get developers up and running quickly, Node.js container images, integrations with other components of Red Hat’s cloud-native stack, and (of course) provide world-class service and support for customers. Earlier this year, the team behind Red Hat’s distribution and support of Node.js even received a “Devie” award from DeveloperWeek for this work, further acknowledging Red Hat’s role in supporting the community and ecosystem.

Red Hat Node.js experts at your fingertips

Red Hat collaborates in more ways than one with the fastest growing runtimes used in business-critical applications on the cloud by contributing to the community, being part of the Technical Steering Committee, and even participating and driving strategic initiatives to carve the future of Node.js. Combining this work with our Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and OpenShift expertise, we can help you reach your goals of delivering and supporting business-critical applications on and off the cloud.

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Using the Red Hat OpenShift tuned Operator for Elasticsearch

Using the Red Hat OpenShift tuned Operator for Elasticsearch

I recently assisted a client to deploy Elastic Cloud on Kubernetes (ECK) on Red Hat OpenShift 4.x. They had run into an issue where Elasticsearch would throw an error similar to:

Max virtual memory areas vm.max_map_count [65530] likely too low, increase to at least [262144]

According to the official documentation, Elasticsearch uses a mmapfs directory by default to store its indices. The default operating system limits on mmap counts are likely to be too low, which may result in out of memory exceptions. Usually, administrators would just increase the limits by running:

sysctl -w vm.max_map_count=262144

However, OpenShift uses Red Hat CoreOS for its worker nodes and, because it is an automatically updating, minimal operating system for running containerized workloads, you shouldn’t manually log on to worker nodes and make changes. This approach is unscalable and results in a worker node becoming tainted. Instead, OpenShift provides an elegant and scalable method to achieve the same via its Node Tuning Operator.

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How to secure microservices with Red Hat Single Sign-On, Fuse, and 3scale

How to secure microservices with Red Hat Single Sign-On, Fuse, and 3scale

In this article, we’ll cover microservice security concepts by using protocols such as OpenID Connect with the support of Red Hat Single Sign-On and 3scale. Working with a microservice-based architecture, user identity, and access control in a distributed, in-depth form must be carefully designed. Here, the integration of these tools will be detailed, step-by-step, in a realistic view.

This article exemplifies the use of tools that can securely run your businesses, avoiding using homemade solutions, and protecting your services by using an API gateway, preventing your applications from being exposed to the public network. The use of an API gateway also provides additional access control, monetization, and analytics.

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Integrating Red Hat OpenStack 9 Cinder Service With Multiple External Red Hat Ceph Storage Clusters

This post describes how to manually integrate Red Hat OpenStack 9 (RHOSP9) Cinder service with multiple pre-existing external Red Hat Ceph Storage 2 (RHCS2) clusters. The final configuration goals are to have Cinder configuration with multiple storage backends and support for creating volumes in either backend.

This post will not cover the initial deployment of OpenStack Cinder or the Ceph clusters.

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