Sharing between Windows 10 and your VM

If you’re are anything like me, you find the easiest — yet still best — way to get things done. After all, life is too short to write programs using Edlin, so give me Visual Studio Code (VS Code). So, what’s an easy way for a Windows .NET developer to write code for Linux?

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Installing Red Hat Container Development Kit on Fedora

Fedora users seeking help on installing Container Development Kit (CDK), here is how you can install CDK 2.2 on your Fedora 24. These same steps can be used for CDK 2.3 too.

CDK provides a container development environment, to build production-grade applications, for use on OpenShift.

The installation of CDK 2.2 on Fedora essentially involves the following stages:

Setting up your virtualization environment
You need to first install the virtualization software, in this case, KVM/libvirt, and then proceed to install Vagrant and its additional plugins to enable the various features of CDK.

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For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

Container Orchestration Specification for better DevOps

The world is moving to microservices, where applications are composed of a complex topology of components, orchestrated into a coordinated topology.

Microservices have become increasingly popular as they increase business agility and reduce the time for changes to be made. On top of this, containers make it easier for organizations to adopt microservices.

Increasingly, containers are the runtimes used for composition, and many excellent solutions have been developed to handle container orchestration such as: Kubernetes/OpenShift; Mesos and its many frameworks like Marathon; and even Docker Compose, Swarm and SwarmKit are trying to address these issues.

But at what cost?

We’ve all experienced that moment when we’ve been working long hours and think “yes, that feature is ready to ship”. We release it into our staging environment and bang, nothing works, and we don’t really know why. What if you could consistently take the same topology you ran in your development workspace, and run it in other, enterprise grade, environments such as your staging or production, and expect it to always JUST WORK?

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For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

Eclipse for JNI development and debugging on Linux (Java and C)

selection_166Cross language development in one project

In this tutorial style article I’ll discuss how to configure Eclipse for Java Native Interface (JNI) development based on a sample project that you can copy and modify. I.e, you can have a single project that can be both Java and C at the same time, and support a full code navigation and debugging of both languages.

This article is focused on the configuration of Eclipse rather than explaining JNI itself, however there are links to JNI literature at the end.

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New Red Hat Developer Toolset 6 now in beta

Today, Red Hat announced the beta availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.0 Beta. Accessible through the Red Hat Developer Program and related Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscriptions, including the no-cost Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer subscription, Red Hat Developer Toolset enables developers to compile applications once and deploy across multiple versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Updated components within Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.0 Beta include versions of:

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C++ support in libcc1: A comprehensive update

GDB relies on libcc1‘s GCC and GDB plugins to implement the “compile code” feature, now extended to support the C++ language.

The Compile and Execute machinery enables GDB users to compile and execute code snippets within the context of an existing process. This allows users to perform inspection and modification of the program state using the target language well beyond the feature set historically exposed by symbolic debuggers. Almost anything that can be expressed in C, and now also in C++, can be compiled, loaded into the running program, and executed on the spot! It is envisioned that this machinery may also be used in the future to speed up conditional breakpoints, and as a foundation for more advanced features such as “Edit and Continue”.

The libcc1 module offers plugins for GDB and GCC that allow GDB to start GCC to compile a user-supplied code snippet. The plugins combine GDB and GCC into a single multi-process program. Through the plugins, GCC can query GDB about the meaning, in the target program, of names encountered in the snippet, and GDB can incrementally inform GCC about variables, functions, types and other constructs present in the program.

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Using Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio to Debug Java Applications in the Red Hat Container Development Kit

Red Hat Container Development KitIn an earlier article, Debugging Java Applications using the Red Hat Container Development Kit, it was discussed how developer productivity could be improved through the use of remotely debugging containerized Java applications running in OpenShift and the Red Hat Container Development Kit. Not only does remote debugging provide real time insight into the operation and performance of an application, but reduces the cycle time a developer may face as they are working through a solution. Included in the discussion were the steps necessary to configure both OpenShift and an integrated development environment (IDE), such as the Eclipse based Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio (DevStudio). While the majority of these actions were automated, there were several manual modifications, like configuring environment variables and exposing ports, that needed to be completed to enable debug functionality. Through advances in the Eclipse tooling for OpenShift, most if not all of these manual steps have been eliminated to enable a streamlined process that offers even more functionality out of the box.

Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio Integration

Enhancements made in Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio now provide full lifecycle support of the Red Hat Container Development Kit, including starting and stopping the underlying Vagrant machine. This eliminates the need for the user to execute commands inside a terminal. To start the CDK from within DevStudio, either use an existing workspace or open a new workspace and open the Servers view by navigating to Window -> Show View and select Servers on the menu bar. With the view now open, right click inside the view and select New -> Server and under the Red Hat JBoss Middleware folder, select Red Hat Container Development Kit. Keep the default location for the server’s host name as localhost and select a name of your choosing if desired to represent the CDK connection and select Next. On the next dialog, two items are required to be configured prior to configuring the CDK:

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JBoss EAP 7 Domain deployments – Part 2: Domain deployments through the EAP 7.0 Management Console

In this blog series we will present several ways to deploy an application on an EAP Domain. The series consists of 5 parts. Each one will be a standalone article, but the series as a whole will present a range of useful topics for working with JBoss EAP.

  • Part 1: Setup a simple EAP 7.0 Domain.
  • Part 2: Domain deployments through the new EAP 7.0 Management Console (this article)
  • Part 3:  Introduction to DMR (Dynamic Model Representation) and domain deployments from the Common Language Interface CLI.
  • Part 4: Domain deployment from the REST Management API.
  • Part 5: Manage EAP 6 Hosts from EAP 7.0 domain

In part 1 of this series on JBoss EAP 7 Domain deployments, we set up a simple EAP 7.0 domain with three hosts:

Review the domain Configuration

The domain controller host0, and two slaves hosts running several EAP 7.0 instances.

JBoss EAP Simple Domain

In the following tutorial we are going to see how to deploy an application on JBoss EAP domain using the new EAP 7.0 Management Console.

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JBoss EAP 7 Domain deployments – Part 1: Set up a simple EAP Domain

Red Hat JBoss EAP 6 introduced some new concepts like configuration simplification, Modularity, new management CLI , User friendly management console  and an amazing feature called “Domains”. Domain mode change the way application are deployed on EAP instances.

JBoss EAP 7.0 was just released and announced by Red Hat.

In this blog series we will present several ways to deploy an application on an EAP Domain. The series consists of 5 parts. Each one will be a standalone article, but the series as a whole will present a range of useful topics for working with JBoss EAP.

  • Part 1: Setup a simple EAP 7.0 Domain (this article).
  • Part 2: Domain deployments through the new EAP 7.0 Management Console
  • Part 3:  Introduction to DMR (Dynamic Model Representation) and domain deployments from the Common Language Interface CLI.
  • Part 4: Domain deployment from the REST Management API.
  • Part 5: Manage EAP 6 Hosts from EAP 7.0 domain

Part 1: Setup a simple EAP 7.0 Domain.

The JBoss EAP “Domain” mode differs from traditional Standalone mode and allows you to deploy and manage EAP instances in a multi server topology. In this first article we are going to set up a JBoss EAP 7.0 domain with the following requirements:

  • 1 Domain Controller on a machine called host0
  • 1 Host Controller on a machine host1 with two EAP instances Server11 and Server12
  • 1 Host Controller on a machine host2 with Three EAP Instances Servers21, Server22 and  Server23
  • Host0 should be run as the master controller,
  • Host1 and Host2 are slaves connecting to Host0
  • Server11 and Server21 are members of the primary server group ( name=primary-server-group)
  • Server12 and Server22 belong  to the secondary server group (name=secondary-server-group)
  • Server23 is the only member of the  singleton server group ( name= singleton-server-group)
  • In real life Machine Host1, Host2 are mostly  in different physical location but for the purpose of this tutorial we are going to simulate them  on the same localhost using a signed EAP 6.4 installation and different configuration folders for each Machine.
  • To keep it simple we will not cover JVM Configuration in depth details  in this part.

Continue reading “JBoss EAP 7 Domain deployments – Part 1: Set up a simple EAP Domain”


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Debugging Java Applications using the Red Hat Container Development Kit

Containerization technology is fundamentally changing the way applications are packaged and deployed. The ability to create a uniform runtime that can be deployed and scaled is revolutionizing how many organizations develop applications. Platforms such as OpenShift also provide additional benefits such as service orchestration through Kubernetes and a suite of tools for achieving continuous integration and continuous delivery of applications. However, even with all of these benefits, developers still need to be able to utilize the same patterns they have used for years in order for them to be productive. For Java developers, this includes developing in an environment that mimics production and the ability to utilize common development tasks, such as testing and debugging running applications. To bridge the gap developers may face when creating containerized applications, the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) can be utilized to develop, build, test and debug running applications.

Red Hat’s Container Development Kit is a pre-built container development environment that enables developers to create containerized applications targeting OpenShift Enterprise and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Once the prerequisite tooling is installed and configured, starting the CDK is as easy as running the “vagrant up” command. Developers immediately have a fully containerized environment at their fingertips.

More information on the Red Hat Container Development can be found Red Hat Developers, and on the Red Hat Customer Portal

One of the many ways to utilize the CDK is to build, run, and test containerized applications on OpenShift. Java is one of the frameworks that can be run on OpenShift, and these applications can be run in a traditional application server, such as JBoss, as well as in a standalone fashion. Even as runtime methodologies change, being able to debug running applications to validate functionality remains an important component of the software development process. Debugging a remote application in Java is made possible through the use of the Java Debug Wire Protocol (JDWP). By adding a few startup arguments, the application can be configured to accept remote connections, for example, from an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) such as Eclipse. In the following sections, we will discuss how to remotely debug an application deployed to OpenShift running on the CDK from an IDE.

Continue reading “Debugging Java Applications using the Red Hat Container Development Kit”


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For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.