Statement Frontier Notes and Location Views

Surely, you too have been frustrated, while single-stepping optimized programs in symbolic debuggers, by the Brownian motion in the source code, and by never being sure, when you reach a certain source line (if you can reach it at all), whether or not earlier lines have taken effect. Our frustration is about to be significantly alleviated, thanks to two new pieces of technology about to be contributed to the GNU toolchain.

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Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (March 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency

Several Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in March 2017. This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency. The major topics of work of the week were (1) further polishing of the parallel algorithms in the C++17 draft, (2) making progress on the executors proposal (which provides mechanisms to control how parallel work is executed, for example on which resources), and (3) continuing work on proposals targeting the Concurrency Technical Specification version 2. We also discussed an important aspect of enabling standard C++ code to execute on GPUs, which is a topic that several people in SG1 have a lot of interest in — I certainly do, for example.

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Running HPC workloads across multiple architectures with Red Hat Enterprise Linux

In this article, I want to provide some background details about our recently developed demonstration video – “Running Game of Life across multiple architectures with Red Hat Enterprise Linux“.

This video shows the Game of Life running in a heterogeneous environment using three 64-bit hardware architectures: aarch64 (ARM v8-A), ppc64le (IBM Power little endian) and x86_64 (Intel Xeon). If you are not familiar with the rules of this cellular automaton, they are worth checking out via the reference above.

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Now available – Red Hat Software Collections 2.4 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.1

Today, we are announcing the general availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.4, Red Hat’s latest set of open source web development tools, dynamic languages, and databases. We are also announcing Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.1, which helps to streamline application development on Red Hat Enterprise Linux by giving developers access to some of the latest, stable open source C and C++ compilers and complementary development tools.

New language additions to Red Hat Software Collections 2.4 include:

  • Nginx 1.10
  • Node.js v6
  • Ruby 2.4
  • Ruby on Rails 5.0
  • Scala 2.10

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Red Hat OpenShift.io is an end-to-end development environment for planning, building and deploying cloud-native applications.

OpenShift.io Developer Tools Overview – Summit 2017 – The Power of Cloud Workspaces – Part 2

Part II of the OpenShift.io Developer Tools overview follows on the heels of the introduction session, this time presented by Pete Muir and Gorkem Ercan. In this session, we are taken through the integrated OpenShift.io Eclipse Che IDE.

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Storage

Adding Persistent Storage to the Container Development Kit 3.0

Note: This article describes the functionality found in the Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.0 Beta. Features and functionality may change in future versions.

The Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) provides an all-in-one environment to not only build and test Docker containers, but to make use of them on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform; all from a single developer’s machine. Since its inception, the CDK used Vagrant as the provisioning platform. Starting with version 3.0, the CDK now makes use of Minishift for the underlying provisioner. The transition to Minishift based CDK 3.0 reduces the number of dependencies that need to be installed and configured. Only a hypervisor such as VirtualBox or KVM is now required.

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No cost. No hassle. Plenty of RHEL Developer Benefits

A year ago Red Hat announced the availability of a no-cost Red Hat Enterprise Linux developer subscription available as part of the Red Hat Developer Program. Offered as a self-supported, development-only subscription, this developer subscriptions provides you with a stable development platform for building enterprise applications – across cloud, physical, virtual, and container-centric infrastructures.

Adoption has been excellent since then, but I was prompted (aka nudged, voluntold) to remind “non users” (yes, some of you are still out there) what it is and how to get it. But I’ll also explain to “users” how to easily re-subscribe (it’s still free) if your 12-month subscription is up.  First, here’s what you “non-users” can get if you become “users”:

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