Red Hat CodeReady Containers

Debugging applications within Red Hat OpenShift containers

Debugging applications within Red Hat OpenShift containers

When debugging an application within a Red Hat OpenShift container, it is important to keep in mind that the Linux environment within the container is subject to various constraints. Because of these constraints, the full functionality of debugging tools might not be available:

  • An unprivileged OpenShift container is restricted from accessing kernel interfaces that are required by some low-level debugging tools.

Note: Almost all applications on OpenShift run in unprivileged containers. Unprivileged containers allow the use of standard debugging tools such as gdbserver or strace. Examples of debugging tools that cannot be used in unprivileged containers include perf, which requires access to the kernel’s perf_events interface, and SystemTap, which depends on the kernel’s module-loading functionality.

  • Debug information for system packages within OpenShift containers is not accessible. There is ongoing work (as part of the elfutils project) to develop a file server for debug information (debuginfod), which would make such access possible.
  • The set of packages in an OpenShift container is fixed ahead of time, when the corresponding container image is built. Once a container is running, no additional packages can be installed. A few debugging tools are preinstalled in commonly used container base images, but any other tools must be added when the container image build process is configured.

To successfully debug a containerized application, it is necessary to understand these constraints and how they determine which debugging tools can be used.

Continue reading “Debugging applications within Red Hat OpenShift containers”

Share
New developer tools in Red Hat OpenShift 4.2

New developer tools in Red Hat OpenShift 4.2

Today’s announcement of Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 represents a major release for developers working with OpenShift and Kubernetes.  There is a new application development-focused user interface, new tools, and plugins for container builds, CI/CD pipelines, and serverless architecture.

application topology view in openshift
Application topology view in developer perspective.

Continue reading “New developer tools in Red Hat OpenShift 4.2”

Share
Red Hat CodeReady Containers overview for Windows and macOS

Red Hat CodeReady Containers overview for Windows and macOS

Red Hat CodeReady Containers 1.0 is now available with support for Red Hat OpenShift 4.2. CodeReady Containers is “OpenShift on your laptop,” the easiest way to get a local OpenShift environment running on your machine. You can get an overview of CodeReady Containers in the tech preview launch post. You can download CodeReady Containers from the product page.

Continue reading “Red Hat CodeReady Containers overview for Windows and macOS”

Share
Red Hat OpenShift 4 on your laptop: Introducing Red Hat CodeReady Containers

Red Hat OpenShift 4 on your laptop: Introducing Red Hat CodeReady Containers

We are pleased to announce that Red Hat CodeReady Containers is now available as a Developer Preview. CodeReady Containers brings a minimal, preconfigured OpenShift 4.1 or newer cluster to your local laptop or desktop computer for development and testing purposes. CodeReady Containers supports native hypervisors for Linux, macOS, and Windows 10. You can download CodeReady Containers from the Red Hat CodeReady Containers product page.

CodeReady Containers is designed for local development and testing on an OpenShift 4 cluster. For running an OpenShift 3 cluster locally, see Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) or Minishift.

In this article, we’ll look at the features and benefits of CodeReady Containers, show a demo of how easy it is to create a local Red Hat OpenShift 4 cluster, and show how to deploy an application on top of it.

Continue reading “Red Hat OpenShift 4 on your laptop: Introducing Red Hat CodeReady Containers”

Share