Now available – Red Hat Software Collections 2.4 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.1

Today, we are announcing the general availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.4, Red Hat’s latest set of open source web development tools, dynamic languages, and databases. We are also announcing Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.1, which helps to streamline application development on Red Hat Enterprise Linux by giving developers access to some of the latest, stable open source C and C++ compilers and complementary development tools.

New language additions to Red Hat Software Collections 2.4 include:

  • Nginx 1.10
  • Node.js v6
  • Ruby 2.4
  • Ruby on Rails 5.0
  • Scala 2.10

Continue reading “Now available – Red Hat Software Collections 2.4 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.1”


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Towards Faster Ruby Hash Tables

Hash tables are an important part of dynamic programming languages. They are widely used because of their flexibility, and their performance is important for the overall performance of numerous programs. Ruby is not an exception. In brief, Ruby hash tables provide the following API:

  • insert an element with given key if it is not yet on the table or update the element value if it is on the table
  • delete an element with given key from the table
  • get the value of an element with given key if it is in the table
  • the shift operation (remove the earliest element inserted into the table)
  • traverse elements in their inclusion order, call a given function and depending on its return value, stop traversing or delete the current element and continue traversing
  • get the first N or all keys or values of elements in the table as an array
  • copy the table
  • clear the table

Continue reading “Towards Faster Ruby Hash Tables”


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Eclipse Vert.x Core Cheat Sheet

Eclipse Vert.x is a toolkit used to build reactive and distributed systems on the Java Virtual Machine. Vert.x supports a variety of languages letting you choose which one you’d prefer. The Vert.x Core cheat sheet covers the creation of a project using Apache Maven, Gradle or the Vert.x CLI, and references most common Vert.x Core APIs, in 3 different languages (Java, JavaScript, and Groovy). Forgot how to create an HTTP server, use the HTTP client, implement a request-response on the event bus?  Just check the cheat sheet. Together with the Red Hat Developer Team, I’ve put together this handy cheat sheet – hopefully, you’ll find it useful too!

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Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 now beta

Today, Red Hat announced the beta availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.3, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source web development tools, dynamic languages, and databases. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges developer agility and production stability by helping to accelerate the creation of modern applications that can then be more confidently deployed into production.

New additions to Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 Beta include:

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Using API keys securely in your OpenShift microservices and applications

In the microservices landscape, the API provides an essential form of communication between components. To allow secure communication between microservices components, as well as third-party applications, it’s important to be able to consume API keys and other sensitive data in a manner that doesn’t place the data at risk. Secret objects are specifically designed to hold sensitive information, and OpenShift makes exposing this information to the applications that need it easy.

In this post, I’ll demonstrate securely consuming API keys in OpenShift Enterprise 3. We’ll deploy a Sinatra application that uses environment variables to interact with the Twitter API; create a Kubernetes Secret object to store the API keys; expose the secret to the application via environment variables; and then perform a rolling update of the environment variables across our pods.

Continue reading “Using API keys securely in your OpenShift microservices and applications”


Join the Red Hat Developer Program (it’s free) and get access to related cheat sheets, books, and product downloads.

 


For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

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