Python

How to install Python 3 on RHEL

This article shows how to install Python 3, pip, venv, virtualenv, and pipenv on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. After following the steps in this article, you should be in a good position to follow many Python guides and tutorials using RHEL.

Using Python virtual environments is a best practice to isolate project-specific dependencies and create reproducible environments. Other tips and FAQs for working with Python and software collections on RHEL 7 are also covered.

There are a number of different ways to get Python 3 installed on RHEL. This article uses Red Hat Software Collections because these give you a current Python installation that is built and supported by Red Hat. During development, support might not seem that important to you. However, support is important to those who have to deploy and operate the applications you write. To understand why this is important, consider what happens when your application is in production and a critical security vulnerability in a core library (for example SSL/TLS) is discovered. This type of scenario is why many enterprises use Red Hat.

Python 3.6 is used in this article. It was the most recent, stable release when this was written. However, you should be able to use these instructions for any of the versions of Python in Red Hat Software Collections including 2.7, 3.4, 3.5, and future collections such as 3.7.

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Using the STOMP Protocol with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis Broker

In this article, we will use a Python-based messaging client to connect and subscribe to a topic with a durable subscription in the Apache ActiveMQ Artemis broker. We will use the text-based STOMP protocol to connect and subscribe to the broker. STOMP clients can communicate with any STOMP message broker to provide messaging interoperability among many languages, platforms, and brokers.

If you need to brush up on the difference between persistence and durability in messaging, check Mary Cochran’s article on developers.redhat.com/blog.

A similar process can be used with Red Hat AMQ 7. The broker in Red Hat AMQ 7 is based on the Apache ActiveMQ Artemis project. See the overview on developers.redhat.com for more information.

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How to install Python Flask on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

I recently got my zero-dollar developer copy of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL, version 7.5) and built a virtual machine (VM) to run it. There it was, on my PC, running in VirtualBox…a gleaming, shiny, brand-spanking-new VM running RHEL. Whatever shall I do with it?

Then I got the idea: I’ll install the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) and build some Python-based containers. I’ll use Flask, a terrific microframework that makes building RESTful services easy.

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Introducing conu – Scripting Containers Made Easier

There has been a need for a simple, easy-to-use handler for writing tests and other code around containers that would implement helpful methods and utilities. For this we introduce conu, a low-level Python library.

This project has been driven from the start by the requirements of container maintainers and testers. In addition to basic image and container management methods, it provides other often used functions, such as container mount, shortcut methods for getting an IP address, exposed ports, logs, name, image extending using source-to-image, and many others.

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Create a scalable REST API with Falcon and RHSCL

APIs are critical to automation, integration and developing cloud-native applications, and it’s vital they can be scaled to meet the demands of your user-base. In this article, we’ll create a database-backed REST API based on the Python Falcon framework using Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL), test how it performs, and scale-out in response to a growing user-base.

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The GDB Python API

GDB has evolved in the last several years to provide a Python API. This series of articles will look at how a user can program GDB with the API and will also take an in-depth look at several features of that API. But, before we begin, a small history lesson is needed and a look at just why an API was needed.

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Using Falcon to cleanup Satellite host records that belong to terminated OSP instances

Overview

In an environment where OpenStack instances are automatically subscribed to Satellite, it is important that Satellite is notified of terminated instances so that is can safely delete its host record. Not doing so will:

  • Exhaust the available subscriptions, leading to unsubscribed hosts not being able to apply updates and security errata.
  • In the event that an emergency security errata needs to be deployed across the organization, Satellite administrators would be unable to determine if a host was either off or terminated, leading to uncertainty with their security posture.

In smaller environments, where one team is responsible for both OSP and Satellite, it’s possible to have one system administrator do this by using their administrator level access across both systems to determine which host records can be safely deleted in Satellite when the corresponding instance no longer exists.

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Red Hat updates Python, PHP, Node.js, more; supports new arches

I am pleased to announce the immediate availability of Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source development tools, dynamic languages, databases, and more. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges development agility and production stability by helping you create modern applications that can be confidently deployed into production. Most of these components are also available in Linux container image format to streamline microservices development.

In addition to these new components having traditional support for x86_64, Red Hat Software Collection 3.0 Beta adds support for three new architectures: s390x, aarch64, and ppc64le.

NEW ADDITIONS to Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta include:

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Now available – Red Hat Software Collections 2.4 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.1

Today, we are announcing the general availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.4, Red Hat’s latest set of open source web development tools, dynamic languages, and databases. We are also announcing Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.1, which helps to streamline application development on Red Hat Enterprise Linux by giving developers access to some of the latest, stable open source C and C++ compilers and complementary development tools.

New language additions to Red Hat Software Collections 2.4 include:

  • Nginx 1.10
  • Node.js v6
  • Ruby 2.4
  • Ruby on Rails 5.0
  • Scala 2.10

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