The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know

During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. Here are eight interesting trends discerned by the results:

I. Microservices are being used to re-architect existing applications as much as for brand new projects

There seems to be a strong emphasis in the market by technology vendors for positioning microservices as being only for new projects.  However, our survey reveals that organizations are also using microservices to re-architect existing and legacy applications.

Sixty-seven percent of Red Hat Middleware customers and 79 percent of Red Hat OpenShift customers indicated this. This data tells us that microservices offer value to users all along their IT transformation journey — whether they are just looking to update their current application portfolio or are gearing up new initiatives. So, if you are only focused on greenfield projects for microservices, it may be a good idea to also start evaluating your existing applications for a microservice re-architecture analysis. Microservices introduce a set of benefits that our customers have already started seeing, and they are applying these benefits not just to new projects but to existing ones as well.

II. Customers prefer a multi-runtime/multi-technology/multi-framework approach for microservices

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Accelerating the development of Node.js using OpenShift

In this blog entry, I want to introduce a “different” way to work with OpenShift. In the typical way to deploy a Pod to OpenShift, we have available a set of very useful objects we have build/image configurations. This takes the pain from us by hiding the details about image construction but, sometimes we just want to see some code running in the cloud. Or we want to see if our service/application is able to interact with nearby services or we have some code but we don’t want to use a git repo just yet. To solve that problem, I will show the concept of InitContainers, and how by being a little bit creative we achieve some cool stuff like deploying our code inside a running container.

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Best practices with React and Redux web application development

Introduction

In the past year, our team has re-written one of our internal apps from Angular to React. While earlier React experience on the team ranged from new to experienced, we learned a lot along this journey. Much of what we learned has been from experiencing pain points in development, or inefficiencies, and either researching others’ best practices or experimenting with what works best for us.

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Using New Relic in Red Hat Mobile Node.js Applications

Introduction

New Relic is an application-monitoring platform that provides in-depth analytics and analysis for applications regardless of the type of environment where they are deployed, or as New Relic put it themselves:

“Gain end-to-end visibility across your customer experience, application performance, and dynamic infrastructure with the New Relic Digital Intelligence Platform.” – New Relic

You might ask why there’s a use for New Relic’s monitoring capabilities when Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) and OpenShift Container Platform both offer insights into the CPU, Disk, Memory, and general resource utilization of your server-side applications. While these generic resource reports are valuable, they might not offer the detail required to debug a specific issue. Since New Relic is built as an analytics platform from the ground up it is capable of providing unique insights into the specific runtime of your applications. For example, the JavaScript code deployed in Node.js applications is run using the V8 JavaScript engine which has a life-cycle that can have a significant impact on the performance of your application depending on how you’ve written it. Utilizing New Relic’s Node.js module provides a real-time view of V8 engine performance and how they might be affecting the performance of your production application. By using this data, you can refine your application code to reduce memory usage, which in turn can free CPU resources due to less frequent garbage collections. Neat!

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How to debug your mobile hybrid app on iOS

Following the blog post series, today, finally we have Part 2, this chapter tries to explain in an easy way how to debug your hybrid app using the Safari web inspector.

As you know sometimes debugging a mobile app on a mobile device can be hard work, for Android and Web pages we have the Chrome Developer tools, this has been an extended way to do it, Part 3 of the blog post series will cover this method, for iOS we have something similar, called the Safari web inspector.

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