From Java to .NET Core, Part 2: Types

In my previous post in the series, I discussed some fairly surface-level differences between C#/.NET and Java. These can be important for Java developers transitioning to .NET Core, to create code that looks and feels “native” to the new ecosystem. In this post, we dig beneath the surface, to understand .NET’s type system. It is my belief that, with Java in the rear view mirror, the .NET type system is more effective and enjoyable to write on. But you be the judge.

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Coding EJB clients for JBoss EAP 7.1

This article summarizes some new features that will be enabled in EAP 7.1 for applications using remote EJB clients. These new features will improve some aspects of the remote EJB communication such as:

  • A simplified method for looking up remote EJBs
  • A new annotation to control transaction propagation from remote EJB clients
  • A new annotation to enable Client side interceptors for EJB calls
  • An update in the remote EJB client configuration file
  • Simplified lookup of remote EJBs

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Easily secure your Spring Boot applications with Keycloak

What is Keycloak?

Although security is a crucial aspect of any application, its implementation can be difficult. Worse, it is often neglected, poorly implemented and intrusive in the code. But lately, security servers have appeared which allow for outsourcing and delegating all the authentication and authorization aspects. Of these servers, one of the most promising is Keycloak, open-source, flexible, and agnostic of any technology, it is easily deployable/adaptable in its own infrastructure.

Moreover, Keycloak is more than just an authentication server, it also provides a complete Identity Management system, user federation for third parties like LDAP and a lot more … Check it out on here.

The project can also be found on Github

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Technical Cheat Sheets for Developers

Over the past few months, we’ve been building and releasing a variety of technical cheat sheets and we’ve been getting many requests for more.  We are working on new cheat sheets every day, ok maybe not weekends, but almost every day. Here are the cheat sheets available today: Linux Commands Cheat SheetAdvanced Linux Commands Cheat SheetWildfly Swarm Cheat SheetContainers Cheat SheetMongoDB Cheat SheetKubernetes Cheat Sheet and the Eclipse Vert.x Cheat Sheet.

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From Java to .NET Core. Part 1

There was a time when the word “.NET” was virtually synonymous with bloat, vendor lock-in, and Windows. .NET Core is the exact opposite. It’s blazingly fast. It’s open source under a permissive license (Mostly MIT, some parts Apache-2.0). Unlike some other open-source platforms, .NET Core’s Contributor License Agreement does not grant exclusive privileges to a single corporation. .NET Core is cross-platform, allowing you to target Windows, Mac, Docker, and many flavors of Linux. My favorite resource for getting started with .NET core is Don Schenck’s free book. This post, I hope, can serve as an addendum specifically for Java developers exploring .NET’s flagship language, C#. While C# borrows much from Java, there are important differences to be aware of. Fortunately, some of them are for the better. In this series of posts, I’ll go over a few of the most prominent differences.

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