Java

Istio Service Mesh Blog Series Recap

The past nine weeks of blog posts have introduced, explained, and demonstrated some of the many features of the Istio service mesh when combined it is with Red Hat OpenShift and Kubernetes. This, the final post in this series, is a recap.

[This is part ten of my ten-part Introduction to Istio series. My previous article was Part 9: Istio Egress: Exit Through the Gift Shop.]

Week one was an introduction to the concept of a service mesh. The concept of a Kubernetes sidecar container was explained and diagrammed, and it was the beginning of a constant theme throughout the blog posts: You don’t have to change your source code.

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Red Hat OpenShift

Externalized HTTP Session in an OpenShift 3.9 Environment

In this article, I will show how you can implement a common use case that often happens when you migrate a classic Java EE application into a Red Hat OpenShift environment.

Scenario

Usually a classic Java EE application stores a user’s information, such the profile’s configuration, in the HTTP session. In a typical production scenario, there are several application server instances that build a cluster and are used to implement high availability, failover, and load balancing. To make sure that stateful information is preserved across the application server instances, you must distribute your session as described in the Java EE 7 specification section EE.6.4, “Servlet 3.1 Requirements.”

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Istio Egress: Exit Through the Gift Shop

Using Istio with Red Hat OpenShift and Kubernetes makes life with microservices easier. Tucked away inside of Kubernetes pods, using the Istio service mesh, your code can run (mostly) in isolation. Performance, ease-of-changes, tracing, and so on are made available by simply using the Istio sidecar container model. But what if you want your microservice to talk to another service that is outside of your OpenShift/Kubernetes/pods environment?

Enter Istio Egress.

[This is part nine of my ten-part Introduction to Istio series. My previous article was Part 8: Istio Smart Canary Launch: Easing into Production.]

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Inside a Red Hat Open Innovation Labs Residency (Part 3)

This article is the final in a series taking readers on a journey to peek inside life in a Red Hat Open Innovation Labs residency.

This is the top-tier experience for any customer*, exposing them to open collaboration, open technologies, and fast agile application delivery methods.

This experience often escapes organizations attempting digital transformation, so through submersion in an Open Innovation Labs residency, Red Hat shares its experience in managing, developing, and delivering solutions with communities, open technologies, and open collaboration.

Join me as I share experiences from inside a real-life residency, watching Red Hat work intimately with a customer, exposing new ways of working, leveraging open technologies using fast, agile application delivery methods and open collaboration.

In the first part, I shared what’s in a Red Hat Open Innovation Labs residency. Then in part two, I looked at what I encountered as the residency progressed towards delivery. All that’s left now is to share the delivery week, known as Demo Day.

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Istio Smart Canary Launch: Easing Into Production

First to fall over when the atmosphere is less than perfect

Your sensibilities are shaken by the slightest defect

You live your life like a canary in a coalmine…

When Sting and The Police sang those lyrics, I doubt they had microservices, Istio, Kubernetes, and OpenShift in mind. Yet here we are, years later, using the Canary Deployment pattern to ease code into production.

[This is part eight of my ten-week Introduction to Istio series.  My previous article was Part 7: Istio Dark Launch: Secret Services.]

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Announcing new product updates of CDK 3.4, DevStudio 11.3, DevSuite 2.3

We’re extremely pleased to announce additions and updates to our suite of Red Hat Developers desktop tooling products, including Container Development Kit 3.4, JBoss Developer Studio 11.3, and our DevSuite 2.3 installer. These updates are a continuation of our efforts to increase developer usability, while adding new features that matter most for users of Red Hat platforms and technologies.

New features in this release

This release has the following updated tools:

Highlights

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Announcing Developer Studio 11.3.0.GA, JBoss Tools 4.5.3 for Eclipse Oxygen.3a

The community editions of JBoss Tools 4.5.3 and JBoss Developer Studio 11.3 for Eclipse Oxygen.3a are here waiting for you. Check it out!

Installation

JBoss Developer Studio comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Simply download it from our JBoss Products page and run it like this:

java -jar jboss-devstudio-<installername>.jar

JBoss Tools or Bring-Your-Own-Eclipse (BYOE) JBoss Developer Studio require a bit more:

This release requires at least Eclipse 4.7 (Oxygen) but we recommend using the latest Eclipse 4.7.3a Oxygen JEE Bundle since then you get most of the dependencies preinstalled.

Once you have installed Eclipse, you can either find us on the Eclipse Marketplace under “JBoss Tools” or “Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio”.

For JBoss Tools, you can also use our update site directly.

http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/oxygen/stable/updates/

What is new?

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Red Hat introduces JDK 10

Support for Java™ 10

Java™ 10 is now supported with Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio 11.3.

Please note that Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio does not run on a Java™ 9/10 virtual machine, but allows for managing and building of Java™ 9/10 projects and artifacts. So, you must first define in your workspace a Java™ 9/10 JDK if you want to manage and build Java™ 9/10 projects.

As Java™ 10 is an extension of Java™ 9, please refer to this article for Java™ 9 related support in Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio.

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Jakarta EE

Jakarta EE is officially out

Jakarta EE is officially out! OK, given the amount of publicity and evangelizing we and others have done around EE4J and Jakarta EE over the past few months you would be forgiven for thinking it was already the case but it wasn’t… until today!

I cannot stress enough how important this is to our industry. The number of Java developers globally is estimated at over 14 million. The Java EE market is estimated at a high multi-billion Dollar value to the industry. Yes there are other languages out there and other frameworks but none of them have yet made the impact Java and Java EE has over the years. Of course Java EE was not perfect for a variety of reasons, but if you consider how much of an impact it has had on the industry given known and debated limitations, just imagine how much it can bring in the years ahead if it were improved.

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