C#

How to call the OpenShift REST API from C#

How to call the OpenShift REST API from C#

When you want to do automated tasks for builds and deployments with Red Hat OpenShift, you might want to take advantage of the OpenShift REST API. In scripts you can use oc CLI command which talks to the REST APIs. However there are times when it is more convenient to do this directly from your C# code without having to invoke an external program. This is the value of having an infrastructure platform that is exposed as services with an open API.

If you want to call the API from your C# code, you have to create a request object, call the API, and parse the response object. The upstream project, OpenShift Origin, provides a Swagger 2.0 specification and you can generate a client library for each programming language. Of course, C# is supported.  This isn’t a new approach, Kubernetes has a repository that is generated by Swagger Codegen.

For C#, we can use Microsoft Visual Studio to generate a C# client library for a REST API. In this article, I’ll walk you through the process of generating the library from the definition.

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Announcing .NET Core 2.1 for Red Hat Platforms

Announcing .NET Core 2.1 for Red Hat Platforms

We are very pleased to announce the general availability of .NET Core 2.1 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenShift platforms!

.NET Core is the open-source, cross-platform .NET platform for building microservices. .NET Core is designed to provide the best performance at scale for applications that use microservices and containers. Libraries can be shared with other .NET platforms, such as .NET Framework (Windows) and Xamarin (mobile applications). With .NET Core you have the flexibility of building and deploying applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux or in containers. Your container-based applications and microservices can easily be deployed to your choice of public or private clouds using Red Hat OpenShift. All of the features of OpenShift and Kubernetes for cloud deployments are available to you.

.NET Core 2.1 continues to broaden its support and tools for microservice development in an open source environment. The latest version of .NET Core includes the following improvements:

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Red Hat Releases .NET Core 2.0

Red Hat Releases .NET Core 2.0

As a follow-up to yesterday’s press release, I am pleased to announce the immediate availability of and support for .NET Core 2.0, the latest version of the open source .NET Core project, on Red Hat’s portfolio of open technologies. A lightweight and modular platform for creating web applications and microservices, .NET Core 2.0 provides significant new developer capabilities while enabling developers to create .NET applications across platforms, and deploy on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, and more.

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From Java to .NET Core, Part 2: Types

From Java to .NET Core, Part 2: Types

In my previous post in the series, I discussed some fairly surface-level differences between C#/.NET and Java. These can be important for Java developers transitioning to .NET Core, to create code that looks and feels “native” to the new ecosystem. In this post, we dig beneath the surface, to understand .NET’s type system. It is my belief that, with Java in the rear view mirror, the .NET type system is more effective and enjoyable to write on. But you be the judge.

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From Java to .NET Core. Part 1

From Java to .NET Core. Part 1

There was a time when the word “.NET” was virtually synonymous with bloat, vendor lock-in, and Windows. .NET Core is the exact opposite. It’s blazingly fast. It’s open source under a permissive license (Mostly MIT, some parts Apache-2.0). Unlike some other open-source platforms, .NET Core’s Contributor License Agreement does not grant exclusive privileges to a single corporation. .NET Core is cross-platform, allowing you to target Windows, Mac, Docker, and many flavors of Linux. My favorite resource for getting started with .NET core is Don Schenck’s free book. This post, I hope, can serve as an addendum specifically for Java developers exploring .NET’s flagship language, C#. While C# borrows much from Java, there are important differences to be aware of. Fortunately, some of them are for the better. In this series of posts, I’ll go over a few of the most prominent differences.

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Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, MSBuild, a build tool for .NET Core CLI!

Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, MSBuild, a build tool for .NET Core CLI!

Microsoft announced the first “alpha” release of the new MSBuild-based .NET Core tools. .NET Core SDK which can be downloaded from the Red Hat Developer Program site consists of .NET Core Runtime and .NET Core command line tools (.NET Core CLI). (Reminder – you must have a Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription first.  If you don’t, you can go here for a no-cost subscription.) The MSBuild tool is included in .NET Core 1.0 preview 3 (not in the latest release .NET Core 1.1). The version number is something complicated because .NET CLI is not GA but still under preview. The MSBuild tool can be used with both .NET Core 1.0 and .NET Core 1.1 runtimes. RHEL is not listed in the .NET Core SDK 1.0 Preview 3 download list. But you can try MSBuild with the .NET Core CLI daily build.

NOTE: Red Hat has just released .NET Core 1.1. However, .NET Core 1.1 doesn’t include the MSBuild tool, you can try MSBuild following this blog.

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