Red Hat Releases .NET Core 2.0

As a follow-up to yesterday’s press release, I am pleased to announce the immediate availability of and support for .NET Core 2.0, the latest version of the open source .NET Core project, on Red Hat’s portfolio of open technologies. A lightweight and modular platform for creating web applications and microservices, .NET Core 2.0 provides significant new developer capabilities while enabling developers to create .NET applications across platforms, and deploy on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, and more.

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From Java to .NET Core, Part 2: Types

In my previous post in the series, I discussed some fairly surface-level differences between C#/.NET and Java. These can be important for Java developers transitioning to .NET Core, to create code that looks and feels “native” to the new ecosystem. In this post, we dig beneath the surface, to understand .NET’s type system. It is my belief that, with Java in the rear view mirror, the .NET type system is more effective and enjoyable to write on. But you be the judge.

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From Java to .NET Core. Part 1

There was a time when the word “.NET” was virtually synonymous with bloat, vendor lock-in, and Windows. .NET Core is the exact opposite. It’s blazingly fast. It’s open source under a permissive license (Mostly MIT, some parts Apache-2.0). Unlike some other open-source platforms, .NET Core’s Contributor License Agreement does not grant exclusive privileges to a single corporation. .NET Core is cross-platform, allowing you to target Windows, Mac, Docker, and many flavors of Linux. My favorite resource for getting started with .NET core is Don Schenck’s free book. This post, I hope, can serve as an addendum specifically for Java developers exploring .NET’s flagship language, C#. While C# borrows much from Java, there are important differences to be aware of. Fortunately, some of them are for the better. In this series of posts, I’ll go over a few of the most prominent differences.

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