From Java to .NET Core. Part 1

There was a time when the word “.NET” was virtually synonymous with bloat, vendor lock-in, and Windows. .NET Core is the exact opposite. It’s blazingly fast. It’s open source under a permissive license (Mostly MIT, some parts Apache-2.0). Unlike some other open-source platforms, .NET Core’s Contributor License Agreement does not grant exclusive privileges to a single corporation. .NET Core is cross-platform, allowing you to target Windows, Mac, Docker, and many flavors of Linux. My favorite resource for getting started with .NET core is Don Schenck’s free book. This post, I hope, can serve as an addendum specifically for Java developers exploring .NET’s flagship language, C#. While C# borrows much from Java, there are important differences to be aware of. Fortunately, some of them are for the better. In this series of posts, I’ll go over a few of the most prominent differences.

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Creating Your First .NET Program on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Sometimes things are really easy. This is one of those cases. There are only six steps to creating and running your first .NET program on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

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Sharing between Windows 10 and your VM

If you’re are anything like me, you find the easiest — yet still best — way to get things done. After all, life is too short to write programs using Edlin, so give me Visual Studio Code (VS Code). So, what’s an easy way for a Windows .NET developer to write code for Linux?

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Creating your first ASP.NET MVC web site on RHEL

Follow this blog post, and within minutes you will have an ASP.NET MVC website running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Yes, I’m talking to you, Windows .NET developer; you’re about to double your OS skillset. Let’s do this.

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Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, MSBuild, a build tool for .NET Core CLI!

Microsoft announced the first “alpha” release of the new MSBuild-based .NET Core tools. .NET Core SDK which can be downloaded from the Red Hat Developer Program site consists of .NET Core Runtime and .NET Core command line tools (.NET Core CLI). (Reminder – you must have a Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription first.  If you don’t, you can go here for a no-cost subscription.) The MSBuild tool is included in .NET Core 1.0 preview 3 (not in the latest release .NET Core 1.1). The version number is something complicated because .NET CLI is not GA but still under preview. The MSBuild tool can be used with both .NET Core 1.0 and .NET Core 1.1 runtimes. RHEL is not listed in the .NET Core SDK 1.0 Preview 3 download list. But you can try MSBuild with the .NET Core CLI daily build.

NOTE: Red Hat has just released .NET Core 1.1. However, .NET Core 1.1 doesn’t include the MSBuild tool, you can try MSBuild following this blog.

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Observations on Porting from .NET Framework to .NET Core

This article is written as opinion. The opinions expressed within are solely those of the author, and do not represent the views of Red Hat.


You’ve heard that .NET has gone open source. You’ve also heard that it has gone cross-platform. And you’ve even heard that Red Hat is shipping a supported version of .NET on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. So maybe you are thinking to yourself, “wow, this is fantastic! I’m going to copy these EXEs and DLLs of my .NET application over to my Red Hat machine and run them!”

Well, unfortunately, it’s not going to be quite that easy. At least not today.

First and foremost, the open source version of .NET is called “.NET Core.” It is available for many platforms, including Windows and Linux. Those .NET projects and applications that you already have running, however, were built on and for .NET Framework. And .NET Framework and .NET Core are not the same thing; they are more like siblings, which also implies that one is not a subset or child of the other.

“Well, then, what’s the point?!”

The good news is that while they are siblings, they do look a lot alike. Although they’re not identical twins, you’ll definitely recognize them as being from the same immediate family. As such, it is possible to port many existing .NET Framework applications to .NET Core.

“How hard is it to port something?”

Continue reading “Observations on Porting from .NET Framework to .NET Core”


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Working with OpenShift secrets for ASP.NET Core

If you want to use secret configuration which you don’t want to store the code repository during developing ASP.NET Core app, what will you do? ASP.NET Core provides Secret Manager tool. Then how about developing on OpenShift? I’d like to talk about Secret Manager tool and working OpenShift secrets for ASP.NET Core in this blog.

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For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

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A step-by-step tutorial for continuous integration with Jenkins for a Red Hat Mobile Native iOS application

This post was originally published on redhat.com.

Part 1: Adding Unit Tests to Native iOS Red Hat Mobile Application Platform Application

A robust and agile mobile application development environment requires continuous integration and delivery. It also requires an integrated and automated unit testing process that helps bring applications to market successfully. This two-part series details my work done at the Red Hat Open Innovation Labs and as a Mobile Technical Account Manager to capture these mobile innovations in a useful, repeatable way. In part one of this two-part series, I break down the steps to create and unit test a native iOS application using Red Hat Mobile Application Platform. In part two, I’ll show how Jenkins can be used to automate continuous integration and unit testing of that Mobile app. If you would like to try out our Red Hat Mobile Application Platform product please visit our Red Hat Mobile Application Platform site.

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P/Invoke in .NET Core on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

P/Invoke(Platform Invocation Service) is one of the features of CLI (Common Language Interface) on .NET Framework. P/Invoke enables managed code to call a native function in DLL (Dynamic Link Library). It’s a powerful tool for .NET Framework to execute existing C-style functions easily. .NET Core also has a P/Invoke feature and it means we can call a native function in .so file (Linux) and . file (Max OSX). I will show you the short example P/Invoke in .NET Core on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

Here is the simple P/Invoke sample using read function in libc. It is the same way as .NET Framework on Windows to import native function.

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It’s a wrap! dotnetConf 2016 Japan

If you are not already familiar with it, dotnetConf 2016 was an online event about .NET, and it was announced at this event that .NET Core RTM would be released at 6/27, at Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.

There are several .NET meetups called dotnetConf.local, of which dotnetConf 2016 Japan is one such event. I had the pleasure of giving a session about .NET Core on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

This event was held with the cooperation of Japan C# User Group (JCUG), Japan Xamarin User Group(JXUG), Microsoft MVPs and many .NET developers. Ιt was raining at that day, but lots of .NET developers came to watch the live streaming take place — live.

 

The recorded session is available on youtube, but the almost session is Japanese. If you happen to speak Japanese, then watch away! But if you are looking for english sessions, you’ll find one at (2:52:00~3:38:00) in the recording below.

Here are the sessions that were given and recorded, and some comments about each one. All the session speakers are pioneers for .NET Core, and they absolutely love .NET. I’m thankful to be a part of this group, and to have been offered the chance to speak. Stay tuned to the Red Hat Developers blog, as I’m going to follow up with materials from my sessions, and write more articles in this blog that cover various topics about .NET technologies

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