Running a NuGet server on OpenShift

When you build your .NET Core project, NuGet packages are retrieved from nuget.org by default. Sometimes, however, you might want to use a local NuGet repository. For example, you may want to:

  • use private NuGet packages, but you don’t want anyone except your associates to see them.
  • cache a NuGet repository at a server near your build servers
  • leave your build server disconnected from the Internet.

I’ll explain how to set up a private NuGet server on OpenShift and how you can use this NuGet server when building your .NET Core project in OpenShift using s2i-dotnetcore.

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Using Falcon to cleanup Satellite host records that belong to terminated OSP instances

Overview

In an environment where OpenStack instances are automatically subscribed to Satellite, it is important that Satellite is notified of terminated instances so that is can safely delete its host record. Not doing so will:

  • Exhaust the available subscriptions, leading to unsubscribed hosts not being able to apply updates and security errata.
  • In the event that an emergency security errata needs to be deployed across the organization, Satellite administrators would be unable to determine if a host was either off or terminated, leading to uncertainty with their security posture.

In smaller environments, where one team is responsible for both OSP and Satellite, it’s possible to have one system administrator do this by using their administrator level access across both systems to determine which host records can be safely deleted in Satellite when the corresponding instance no longer exists.

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Manage test dependencies with Go

Introduction

I’m working on the upstream fabric8-wit project of openshift.io. In this Go project, we embrace testing as best as we can in order to deliver a stable component. Testing acts as our safety net to allow for fast-paced feature development. This blog post is about our recent change in our testing strategy. It is not as boring as it might sound at first. 😉

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Using New Relic in Red Hat Mobile Node.js Applications

Introduction

New Relic is an application-monitoring platform that provides in-depth analytics and analysis for applications regardless of the type of environment where they are deployed, or as New Relic put it themselves:

“Gain end-to-end visibility across your customer experience, application performance, and dynamic infrastructure with the New Relic Digital Intelligence Platform.” – New Relic

You might ask why there’s a use for New Relic’s monitoring capabilities when Red Hat Mobile Application Platform (RHMAP) and OpenShift Container Platform both offer insights into the CPU, Disk, Memory, and general resource utilization of your server-side applications. While these generic resource reports are valuable, they might not offer the detail required to debug a specific issue. Since New Relic is built as an analytics platform from the ground up it is capable of providing unique insights into the specific runtime of your applications. For example, the JavaScript code deployed in Node.js applications is run using the V8 JavaScript engine which has a life-cycle that can have a significant impact on the performance of your application depending on how you’ve written it. Utilizing New Relic’s Node.js module provides a real-time view of V8 engine performance and how they might be affecting the performance of your production application. By using this data, you can refine your application code to reduce memory usage, which in turn can free CPU resources due to less frequent garbage collections. Neat!

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