Create a scalable REST API with Falcon and RHSCL

APIs are critical to automation, integration and developing cloud-native applications, and it’s vital they can be scaled to meet the demands of your user-base. In this article, we’ll create a database-backed REST API based on the Python Falcon framework using Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL), test how it performs, and scale-out in response to a growing user-base.

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The State of Microservices Survey 2017 – Eight trends you need to know

During the fall of 2017, we conducted a microservices survey with our Red Hat Middleware and Red Hat OpenShift customers. Here are eight interesting trends discerned by the results:

I. Microservices are being used to re-architect existing applications as much as for brand new projects

There seems to be a strong emphasis in the market by technology vendors for positioning microservices as being only for new projects.  However, our survey reveals that organizations are also using microservices to re-architect existing and legacy applications.

Sixty-seven percent of Red Hat Middleware customers and 79 percent of Red Hat OpenShift customers indicated this. This data tells us that microservices offer value to users all along their IT transformation journey — whether they are just looking to update their current application portfolio or are gearing up new initiatives. So, if you are only focused on greenfield projects for microservices, it may be a good idea to also start evaluating your existing applications for a microservice re-architecture analysis. Microservices introduce a set of benefits that our customers have already started seeing, and they are applying these benefits not just to new projects but to existing ones as well.

II. Customers prefer a multi-runtime/multi-technology/multi-framework approach for microservices

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Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency

Several Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in November 2017. This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency. SG1 had a full schedule as usual, with Executors, Futures, and deferred reclamation mechanisms (e.g., RCU) being major discussion topics. We also started to track the state of proposals and topics we will need to discuss in a publicly accessible bug tracker.

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Accelerating the development of Node.js using OpenShift

In this blog entry, I want to introduce a “different” way to work with OpenShift. In the typical way to deploy a Pod to OpenShift, we have available a set of very useful objects we have build/image configurations. This takes the pain from us by hiding the details about image construction but, sometimes we just want to see some code running in the cloud. Or we want to see if our service/application is able to interact with nearby services or we have some code but we don’t want to use a git repo just yet. To solve that problem, I will show the concept of InitContainers, and how by being a little bit creative we achieve some cool stuff like deploying our code inside a running container.

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Best practices with React and Redux web application development

Introduction

In the past year, our team has re-written one of our internal apps from Angular to React. While earlier React experience on the team ranged from new to experienced, we learned a lot along this journey. Much of what we learned has been from experiencing pain points in development, or inefficiencies, and either researching others’ best practices or experimenting with what works best for us.

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