Red Hat Integration

CDC pipeline with Red Hat AMQ Streams and Red Hat Fuse

CDC pipeline with Red Hat AMQ Streams and Red Hat Fuse

Change Data Capture (CDC) is a pattern that enables database changes to be monitored and propagated to downstream systems. It is an effective way of enabling reliable microservices integration and solving typical challenges, such as gradually extracting microservices from existing monoliths.

With the release of Red Hat AMQ Streams 1.2, Red Hat Integration now includes a developer preview of CDC features based on upstream project Debezium.

This article explains how to make use of Red Hat Integration to create a complete CDC pipeline. The idea is to enable applications to respond almost immediately whenever there is a data change. We capture the changes as they occur using Debezium and stream it using Red Hat AMQ Streams. We then filter and transform the data using Red Hat Fuse and send it to Elasticsearch, where the data can be further analyzed or used by downstream systems.

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Using the 3scale toolbox Jenkins Shared Library

Using the 3scale toolbox Jenkins Shared Library

In the previous article of this series, Deploy your API from a Jenkins Pipeline, we discovered how the 3scale toolbox can help you deploy your API from a Jenkins Pipeline on Red Hat OpenShift/Kubernetes. In this article, we will improve the pipeline from the previous article to make it more robust, less verbose, and also offer more features by using the 3scale toolbox Jenkins Shared Library.

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Deploy your API from a Jenkins Pipeline

Deploy your API from a Jenkins Pipeline

In a previous article, 5 principles for deploying your API from a CI/CD pipeline, we discovered the main steps required to deploy your API from a CI/CD pipeline and this can prove to be a tremendous amount of work. Hopefully, the latest release of Red Hat Integration greatly improved this situation by adding new capabilities to the 3scale CLI. In 3scale toolbox: Deploy an API from the CLI, we discovered how the 3scale toolbox strives to automate the delivery of APIs. In this article, we will discuss how the 3scale toolbox can help you deploy your API from a Jenkins pipeline on Red Hat OpenShift/Kubernetes.

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3scale toolbox: Deploy an API from the CLI

3scale toolbox: Deploy an API from the CLI

Deploying your API from a CI/CD pipeline can be a tremendous amount of work. The latest release of Red Hat Integration greatly improved this situation by adding new capabilities to the 3scale CLI. The 3scale CLI is named 3scale toolbox and strives to help API administrators to operate their services as well as automate the delivery of their API through Continuous Delivery pipelines.

Having a standard CLI is a great advantage for our customers since they can use it in the CI/CD solution of their choice (Jenkins, GitLab CI, Ansible, Tekton, etc.). It is also a means for Red Hat to capture customer needs as much as possible and offer the same feature set to all our customers.

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5 principles for deploying your API from a CI/CD pipeline

5 principles for deploying your API from a CI/CD pipeline

With companies generating more and more revenue through their APIs, these APIs also have become even more critical. Quality and reliability are key goals sought by companies looking for large scale use of their APIs, and those goals are usually supported through well-crafted DevOps processes. Figures from the tech giants make us dizzy: Amazon is deploying code to production every 11.7 seconds, Netflix deploys thousands of time per day, and Fidelity saved $2.3 million per year with their new release framework. So, if you have APIs, you might want to deploy your API from a CI/CD pipeline.

Deploying your API from a CI/CD pipeline is a key activity of the “Full API Lifecycle Management.” Sitting between the “Implement” and “Secure” phases, the “Deploy” activity encompasses every process needed to bring the API from source code to the production environment. To be more specific, it covers Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery.

Deploy your API from a CI/CD pipeline - High Level view

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API-first design with OpenAPI and Red Hat Fuse

API-first design with OpenAPI and Red Hat Fuse

API-first design is a commonly used approach where you define the interfaces for your application before providing an actual implementation. This approach gives you a lot of benefits. For example, you can test whether your API has the right structure before investing a lot of time implementing it, and you can share your ideas with other teams early to get valuable feedback. Later in the process, delays in the back-end development will not affect front-end developers dependent on your service so much, because it’s easy to create mock implementations of a service from the API definition.

Much has been written about the benefits of API-first design, so this article will instead focus on how to efficiently take an OpenAPI definition and bring it into code with Red Hat Fuse.

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Announcing Red Hat AMQ streams 1.2 with Apache Kafka 2.2 support

Announcing Red Hat AMQ streams 1.2 with Apache Kafka 2.2 support

We are thrilled to announce an updated release of the data streaming component of our messaging suite, Red Hat AMQ streams 1.2, which is part of Red Hat integration.

Red Hat AMQ streams, based on the Apache Kafka project, offers a distributed backbone that allows microservices and other applications to share data with extremely high throughput and extremely low latency. AMQ streams makes running and managing Apache Kafka a Kubernetes-native experience, by additionally delivering Red Hat OpenShift Operators, a simplified and automated way to deploy, manage, upgrade and configure a Kafka ecosystem installation on Kubernetes.

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Introduction to cloud-native application environment architecture

Introduction to cloud-native application environment architecture

Cloud-native environment architecture can be challenging to understand. To help make sense of it for application developers and software/system architects,  I will attempt to explain the various parts and how they work together. Toward this end, I find it helpful to think about the architecture in four separate layers: application software development, service scaling, application network, and container orchestration platform.

In this article, I will describe the first technology layer: application software development. I drew the following diagram to make these concepts easier to visualize.

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Subsecond deployment and startup of Apache Camel applications

Subsecond deployment and startup of Apache Camel applications

The integration space is in constant change. Many open source projects and closed source technologies did not withstand the tests of time and have disappeared from the middleware stacks for good. After a decade, however, Apache Camel is still here and becoming even stronger for the next decade of integration. In this article, I’ll provide some history of Camel and then describe two changes coming to Apache Camel now (and later to Red Hat Fuse) and why they are important for developers. I call these changes subsecond deployment and subsecond startup of Camel applications.

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