JBoss BPM Suite

Reducing data inconsistencies with Red Hat Process Automation Manager

Managing data reconciliation through a specific process is a common necessity for projects that require Digital Process Automation (formerly known as Business Process Management), and Red Hat Process Automation Manager helps to address such a requirement. This article provides good practices and a technique for satisfying data reconciliation in a structured and clean way.

Red Hat Process Automation Manager was formerly known as Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite, so it’s worth mentioning that jBPM is the upstream project that fuels Process Automation Manager. The blog post From BPM and business automation to digital automation platforms explains the reasons behind the new name and shares exciting news for this major release.

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Detecting credit card fraud with Red Hat Decision Manager 7

Red Hat Decision Manager provides a vast array of decision management functionality. From the Decision Tables feature in the new Decision Model and Notation (DMN) v1.1, which implements the full FEEL Compliance Level 3 of the DMN specification, to Predictive Model Markup Language (PMML).

Another powerful feature is the Complex Event Processing (CEP) engine. This engine provides the ability to detect, correlate, abstract, aggregate or compose and react to events. In other words, the technology provides techniques to infer complex events from simple events, react to the events of interest, and take actions. The main difference between CEP and normal rules execution is the notion of time. Where standard rules execution in Decision Manager deals with facts and reasoning over these facts, the CEP engine focusses on events. An event represents a significant change of state at a particular point in time or interval.

Recently, I was asked to demonstrate how Decision Manager CEP can be used in a real-time credit card fraud detection system. One of the requirements I was presented with ended up in an interesting rule implementation that forms the basis of this article. The requirement was defined as follows:

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What is a KJAR?

Red Hat JBoss® BPM Suite and Red Hat Decision Manager (formerly Red Hat JBoss BRMS) both use an artifact packaging known as a “KJAR”, or knowledge artifact, since version 6. What is this file type? What separates it from a standard JAR file?

The basic summary

In very few words, a KJAR is a standard JAR file that has some extra files included. A KJAR keeps the same .jar extension as a JAR file, because its basic file structure is identical to that of a JAR.

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Get Started on Process Driven Development with JBoss BPM

Are you interested in an introduction to the concepts of process management (BPM)?

Do you want to learn how your business can leverage process driven application delivery?

Are you looking for an easy to understand guide to mastering Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite tooling?

Do you need a step-by-step introduction to setting up JBoss BPM Suite including coverage of practical and important topics like data modeling, designing business rules and processes, detailed real world examples, and tips for testing?

For the last few years I’ve been working on putting years of experience with JBoss BPM Suite and community projects Drools and jBPM together into one easy to understand book.

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Extend Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite through the Service Repository

Introduction

Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite offers a really flexible BPMN engine that can be extended with Custom Reusable Services. Most users know them as Work Item Handler (the technical implementation name), but few of them know that it’s possible to expose them in a comfortable list of reusable services. In fact, you can create a repository of services and simplify the life of the BPMN designer that can easily pick and choose the right service.

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5 Pillars of a Successful Java Web Application (Part 3/3)

In this series of posts, we’ll detail our talk presented at Java One San Francisco 2017: “5 Pillars of a Successful Java Web Application”, where we shared our cumulative experience over the years building the workbench and the web tooling for Drools and jBPM platform. If you didn’t read the first ones, take a chance to get in touch with the pillars [link for the first].

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5 Pillars of a Successful Java Web Application (Part 2/3)

In this series of posts, we’ll detail our talk presented at Java One San Francisco 2017: “5 Pillars of a Successful Java Web Application”, where we shared our cumulative experience over the years building the workbench and the web tooling for the Drools and jBPM platform. If you didn’t read the first post, take a moment to read the first pillar.

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5 Pillars of a Successful Java Web Application (Part 1/3)

There are many challenges related to building and architecting a web application, especially if you want to keep your codebase updated with modern techniques without throwing away a lot of your code every two years in favor of the latest trendy JS framework.

In our team, we can successfully keep a 7+ year-old Java application up-to-date, combining modern techniques with a legacy codebase of more than 1 million LOC, with an agile, sustainable, and evolutionary web approach.

More than just choosing and applying any web framework as the foundation of our web application, we based our web application architecture on 5 architectural pillars that proved crucial for our platform’s success. This post is a first in a series, that will discuss exactly that.

In the first week of October, Alex Porcelli and I had the opportunity to present at JavaOne San Francisco 2017, the two sessions we held related to our work: 5 Pillars of a Successful Java Web Application and The Hidden Secret of Java Open Source Projects.

It was great to share our cumulative experience over the years building the workbench and the web tooling for the Drools and jBPM platform and both sessions had great attendance (250+ people in the room).

In this series of posts, we’ll detail our “5 Pillars of a Successful Java Web Application”, trying to give you an overview of our research and a taste of participating in a great event like Java One. Let’s talk about them:

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JBoss: Developer’s Guide

Modern applications development demands optimized tools and services. Applications must integrate with different systems and share data. Organizations must be able to immediately respond to changing conditions. JBoss Middleware drives enterprise application innovation every day to deliver the best projects and products. Whether you are an experienced enterprise application developer or just getting started, JBoss: Developer’s Guide provides you with the best time to value guide for enterprise application delivery with the JBoss brand, using hands-on coding and lab exercises with real-life business examples. In-depth information is provided for multiple components of the JBoss Middleware ecosystem to guide you through application development, deployment, data storage and access, communication and messaging, and business process optimization.

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