Integration

Spring Boot-enabled business process automation with Red Hat Process Automation Manager

With the release of version 7.1 of Red Hat Process Automation Manager (RHPAM), the platform now supports the deployment of the process automation manager runtime as a “capability” within Spring Boot applications. As Maciej Swiderski, the project lead for jBPM.org (the upstream community project for RHPAM) explained earlier this year, the KIE (Knowledge Is Everything) platform on which RHPAM is built provides Spring Boot Starters to quickly build a business application or microservice with process and case execution capabilities using a minimal amount of code.

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How to run Kafka on Openshift, the enterprise Kubernetes, with AMQ Streams

How to run Kafka on Openshift, the enterprise Kubernetes, with AMQ Streams

On October 25th Red Hat announced the general availability of their AMQ Streams Kubernetes Operator for Apache Kafka. Red Hat AMQ Streams focuses on running Apache Kafka on Openshift providing a massively-scalable, distributed, and high performance data streaming platform. AMQ Streams, based on the Apache Kafka and Strimzi projects, offers a distributed backbone that allows microservices and other applications to share data with extremely high throughput. This backbone enables:

  • Publish and subscribe: Many to many dissemination in a fault tolerant, durable manner.
  • Replayable events: Serves as a repository for microservices to build in-memory copies of source data, up to any point in time.
  • Long-term data retention: Efficiently stores data for immediate access in a manner limited only by disk space.
  • Partition messages for more horizontal scalability: Allows for organizing messages to maximum concurrent access.

One of the most requested items from developers and architects is how to get started with a simple deployment option for testing purposes. In this guide we will use Red Hat Container Development Kit, based on minishift, to start an Apache Kafka cluster on Kubernetes.

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Welcome Apache Kafka to the Kubernetes Era!

Welcome Apache Kafka to the Kubernetes Era!

We have pretty exciting news this week as Red Hat is announcing the General Availability of their Apache Kafka Kubernetes operator. Red Hat AMQ Streams delivers the mechanisms for managing Apache Kafka on top of OpenShift, our enterprise distribution for Kubernetes.

Everything started last May 2018 when David Ingham (@dingha) unveiled the Developer Preview as new addition to the Red Hat AMQ offering. Red Hat AMQ Streams focuses on running Apache Kafka on OpenShift. In the microservices world, where several components need to rely on a high throughput communication mechanism, Apache Kafka has made a name for itself for being a leading real-time, distributed messaging platform for building data pipelines and streaming applications.

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EventFlow: Event-driven microservices on OpenShift (Part 1)

EventFlow: Event-driven microservices on OpenShift (Part 1)

This post is the first in a series of three related posts that describes a lightweight cloud-native distributed microservices framework we have created called EventFlow. EventFlow can be used to develop streaming applications that can process CloudEvents, which are an effort to standardize upon a data format for exchanging information about events generated by cloud platforms.

The EventFlow platform was created to specifically target the Kubernetes/OpenShift platforms, and it models event-processing applications as a connected flow or stream of components. The development of these components can be facilitated through the use of a simple SDK library, or they can be created as Docker images that can be configured using environment variables to attach to Kafka topics and process event data directly.

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Use Groovy to customize the Maven build process

Use Groovy to customize the Maven build process

Apache Maven is a popular build automation tool used primarily for Java projects (although it can also be used to build and manage projects written in other languages). Maven uses a pom.xml file to centrally manage a project’s build and its dependencies. If you have worked anywhere near to the Java ecosystem chances are that, for the good or for the bad, you have come across the use of this tool.

Maven plugins are used to enhance and customize the Maven build process; while the list of existing plugins is quite extensive, it is common to need to implement some small changes or tweak the build just a bit, which makes writing a whole plugin feel like overkill.

This post describes a possible solution: the GMaven Plus plugin.

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How to set up LDAP authentication for the Red Hat AMQ 7 message broker console

How to set up LDAP authentication for the Red Hat AMQ 7 message broker console

This post is a continuation of the series on Red Hat AMQ 7 security topics for developers and ops people started by Mary Cochran.  We will see how to configure LDAP authentication on a Red Hat AMQ 7 broker instance. In order to do so, we will go perform the followings actions:

  • Set up a simple LDAP server with a set of users and groups using Apache Directory Studio.
  • Connect Red Hat AMQ 7 to LDAP using authentication providers.
  • Enable custom LDAP authorization policies in Red Hat AMQ 7.

 

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Auto-generating news and publishing it to WordPress with Apache Camel

Auto-generating news and publishing it to WordPress with Apache Camel

With the release of Apache Camel 2.21, some new components were added to the project and Camel WordPress was one of them. Camel is one of the upstream community projects for Red Hat Fuse. In this article, we will see how to use this new component to publish an auto-generated news post based on a soccer statistics API. The example consumes the statistics API, generates the text based on a Natural Language Generation (NLG) library and then publishes it to the WordPress blog.

WordPress is one of the most used open source tools for creating websites. More than 30% of the web is built on top of WordPress. Besides creating websites, blogs, and apps, WordPress leverages a huge plugin repository maintained by a passionate community. There are even plugins that can turn a WordPress website into an e-commerce platform.

Since version 4.7, WordPress exposes a REST API capable of interacting with its resources, for example, users, categories, pages, posts, and custom types. Now it’s possible for third parties to integrate with the WordPress platform and perform almost anything with their resources.

Some companies implement internal websites, blogs, and project sites using WordPress. Integrating such platforms with another company’s components—such as CRM, ERP, LDAP, and Calendar Services—would add extra value to WordPress-based projects. Camel WordPress can help integrate those components easily. To get started using this new component, nothing is better than a demo.

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Reducing data inconsistencies with Red Hat Process Automation Manager

Reducing data inconsistencies with Red Hat Process Automation Manager

Managing data reconciliation through a specific process is a common necessity for projects that require Digital Process Automation (formerly known as Business Process Management), and Red Hat Process Automation Manager helps to address such a requirement. This article provides good practices and a technique for satisfying data reconciliation in a structured and clean way.

Red Hat Process Automation Manager was formerly known as Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite, so it’s worth mentioning that jBPM is the upstream project that fuels Process Automation Manager. The blog post From BPM and business automation to digital automation platforms explains the reasons behind the new name and shares exciting news for this major release.

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How to integrate A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

How to integrate A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

This article describes in detail how to integrate Red Hat A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7 and covers in detail the admin-object configuration, especially the pool-name configuration. The attribute pool-name for the admin-object explanation can lead to confusion. In this post, I will try to clarify many of the steps, give an overview of the components, and how they fit together.

The JBoss EAP requires the configuration of a resource adapter as a central component for integration with the A-MQ 6.3. In addition, the MDBs configuration on the EAP is required to enable the JMS consumers. On the A-MQ 6.3, the configuration of the Transport Connectors is required to open the communication channel with the EAP.

All the steps required to configure EAP 7 to use A-MQ 6.3 as an external JMS broker are described here:

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Setting up RBAC on Red Hat AMQ Broker

Setting up RBAC on Red Hat AMQ Broker

One thing that is common in the enterprise world, especially in highly regulated industries, is to have separation of duties. Role-based access controls (RBAC) have built-in support for separation of duties. Roles determine what operations a user can and cannot perform. This post provides an example of how to configure proper RBAC on top of Red Hat AMQ, a flexible, high-performance messaging platform based on the open source Apache ActiveMQ Artemis project.

In most of the cases, separation of duties on Red Hat AMQ can be divided into three primary roles:

  1. Administrator role, which will have all permissions
  2. Application role, which will have permission to publish, consume, or produce messages to a specific address, subscribe to topics or queues, or create and delete addresses.
  3. Operation role, which will have read-only permission via the web console or supported protocols

To implement those roles, Red Hat AMQ has several security features that need be configured, as described in the following sections.

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