Red Hat Software Collections

Setting up Django and Python 2.7 on Red Hat Enterprise 6 the easy way

Recently, I needed to get Django installed with Python 2.7 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. As this is not a directly supported activity, I wanted to document how I went about it. As you might imagine, the generally expected method for install would be to grab the Python 2.7 source tree and then build it. Obviously, that can be a lot of work; is not particularly repeatable; and, potentially, exposes you to more security flaws. As a result, I decided to try to leverage a “new’ish” technology developed (in the open) by Red Hat called Software Collections. An in depth discussion of Software Collections is for another post, for now we just need to know that Software Collections are rpms that contain all (or most) of their supporting libraries, install under /opt, are updatable through yum, and, the core software collections code (scl-utils) is supported by Red Hat. A number of collections have been created and released by the community at http://bit.ly/fedora-scl.

OK, getting started. I created a new VM using a RHEL 6.3 image on an instance of RHOS (Red Hat Open Stack),

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Ruby on Rails 3.2 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 with Software Collections

While Red Hat Enterprise Linux is known for its stability and flexibility, you might not think of it first when looking for the latest version of your web application framework. If you’re a developer working with Ruby and Ruby on Rails, you probably want to take advantage of their new features. Sure, you can use RVM, but sometimes you just want to get supported system packages.

Software Collections (often abbreviated as SCL) allows you to run more recent versions of software than what ships with your current version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. This article will show you how to start development of a Rails 3.2 application running on Ruby 1.9.3 – all on RHEL 6, using only RPM packages, alongside your default Ruby installation. This tutorial assumes that you are familiar with Ruby on Rails basics, such as creating a new application and using bundler. It is also beneficial (although not necessary) to understand how Software Collections work in general.

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Software Collections on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Did you ever wish you had newer versions of the software on your Red Hat Enterprise Linux machines? You are probably not alone. Providing new versions of software in rpm is hard, because rpm supports only one version installed on your computer at a time. Multiple versions on one machine can conflict with each other or create unpredictable behaviour in applications that you might not have considered dependencies.

Last year, we developed Software Collections to allow you to install newer versions of software in rpm safely into /opt and switch between new and old releases. This allows your Red Hat Enterprise Linux system applications to continue to run with the old version, while new apps can work with the new version. A good example of this is Python; many essential packages are written in Python. How can you update to the latest release of Python without causing half your system to break? Through Software Collections, you can install a newer version of Python – for example python-3.3 – into /opt avoiding conflicts in files and strange behaviour of apps that depend on an older version of Python.

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