Infrastructure

Virtual event: Conquer complexity with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Virtual event: Conquer complexity with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Since the general release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, we’ve had great response from those of you who have downloaded the product and used our complimentary RHEL 8 resources. RHEL 8 is the most developer-friendly version ever, but you may still have questions.

Join us on June 18 for our comprehensive virtual event: Conquer complexity with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8. In this event, experts John Gantz, Senior Vice President, IDC, and Ron Pacheco, Director, Product Management Global, Red Hat, will explain what RHEL 8 can do for your organization.

Continue reading “Virtual event: Conquer complexity with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8”

Share
Container-related content you might have missed at Red Hat Summit

Container-related content you might have missed at Red Hat Summit

If you weren’t lucky enough to attend the recent Red Hat Summit or you went but couldn’t make it to all the container-related sessions, worry not. We teamed up with Scott McCarty, Principal Technology Product Manager–Containers at Red Hat, to bring you an overview of what you missed.

Choosing the right container base image for your applications

The Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) gives you three options for building containers with the full power of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) underneath. The goal is to create the smallest possible image that fully supports your application. You select a base image depending on the application you’re packaging in a container. For example, if you have a Golang or .NET application, all of that application’s dependencies are built in. That means you can use the minimal image (ubi-minimal), which contains microdnf, a package manager that only supports install, update, and remove functions. It also includes, well, a minimal set of tools.

Continue reading “Container-related content you might have missed at Red Hat Summit”

Share
Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)

Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)

If you’re like me—a developer who works with customers who rely on the tried-and-true Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), works with containerized applications, and also prefers to work with Fedora Linux as their desktop operating system—you’re excited by the announcement of the Universal Base Images (UBI). This article shows how UBI actually works, by building the container image for a simple PHP application.

With UBI, you can build and redistribute container images based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux without requiring a Red Hat subscription. Users of UBI-based container images do not need Red Hat subscriptions. No more extra work creating CentOS-based container images for your community projects or for your customers that prefer self-support.

I tested all these steps on my personal Fedora 29 system, and they should work on any Linux distribution. I am also a big fan of the new container tools such as Podman, which should be available to your favorite Linux distribution. If you are working on a Windows or MacOS system, you can replace the Podman commands with Docker.

Continue reading “Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)”

Share
An introduction to Linux virtual interfaces: Tunnels

An introduction to Linux virtual interfaces: Tunnels

Linux has supported many kinds of tunnels, but new users may be confused by their differences and unsure which one is best suited for a given use case. In this article, I will give a brief introduction for commonly used tunnel interfaces in the Linux kernel. There is no code analysis, only a brief introduction to the interfaces and their usage on Linux. Anyone with a network background might be interested in this information. A list of tunnel interfaces, as well as help on specific tunnel configuration, can be obtained by issuing the iproute2 command ip link help.

Continue reading “An introduction to Linux virtual interfaces: Tunnels”

Share
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Image Builder: Building custom system images

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Image Builder: Building custom system images

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 ships a new tool, called Image Builder, that allows you to create custom Red Hat Enterprise Linux system images in a variety of formats. These include compatibility with major cloud providers and virtualization technologies available in the market. As a result, it enables you to quickly spin up new Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) systems in different platforms, according to your requirements.

In this article, we’ll show how to set up Image Builder in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 and create a couple of images to test its capabilities. Red Hat recommends running Image Builder on its own dedicated virtual machine.

To follow this tutorial, you will need a virtual machine running Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 where we’ll install Image Builder. This virtual machine needs to be subscribed and have access to the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 packages repositories. We’ll not cover Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 installation in this post. For more information, consult the product documentation.

Continue reading “Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Image Builder: Building custom system images”

Share
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 developer cheat sheet

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 developer cheat sheet

With the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, I’m pleased to introduce our new RHEL 8 cheat sheet for developers. This version has been updated from the beta version to reflect the final updates in RHEL 8. This document is intended for those of you who are:

  1. Already familiar with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, but you want a quick reference for new RHEL 8 commands.
  2. New to Red Hat Enterprise Linux and want to start exploring RHEL 8.

Here’s a sample of some of the common module commands you’ll find in this cheat sheet. 

Continue reading “Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 developer cheat sheet”

Share
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 now generally available

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 now generally available

I think Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 is the most developer-friendly Red Hat Enterprise Linux that we’ve delivered, and I hope you agree. Let’s get down to business, or rather coding, so you can see for yourself. You can read the Red Hat corporate press release.

For this article, I’ll quickly recap Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 features (architecture, containers), introduce the very new and cool Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI), and provide a handy list of developer resources to get you started on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

TL;DR

Download RHEL 8 now

Download RHEL 8 image

Continue reading “Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 now generally available”

Share