Developer Tools

5 things you need to know about GCC 5 – Developer Toolset Beta

5 things you need to know about GCC 5 – Developer Toolset Beta

As always when we rebase GCC in Developer Toolset (as we announced yesterday) to a new major upstream release, there are  a huge number of bugfixes, performance improvements, quality of implementation enhancements – the list goes on. In this article, however, I’d like to focus on four headline features and one new way of using the tools. Let’s dive in.

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Ready for gcc 5?  Developer Toolset 4 now in beta

Ready for gcc 5? Developer Toolset 4 now in beta

Today, we are pleased to announce the beta availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 4 Beta, giving you access to the latest, stable open source C and C++ compilers and complementary development and performance profiling tools. Accessible through the Red Hat Developers Program and related subscriptions, Red Hat Developer Toolset enables developers to compile applications once and deploy across multiple versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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JBoss Developer Studio 9 – more Docker, OpenShift and WildFly

JBoss Developer Studio 9 – more Docker, OpenShift and WildFly

JBoss Developer Studio 9 for Eclipse Mars is now available for download.  Some advances include new Server Adapters, OpenShift v3 enhancements and more Docker functionality.   A new list of features can be found in the documentation but here is a list of highlights:

WildFly 10 and EAP 7 Server Adapters

New server adapters for JBoss EAP 7 and WildFly 10 have been added to the toolset, allowing you to enjoy all the past benefits, but with all the newest runtimes.

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Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (May 2015): Parallelism and Concurrency

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (May 2015): Parallelism and Concurrency

gnu logoSeveral Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in May 2015 at Lenexa, Kansas, USA.  This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency.

Finishing the Technical Specifications (TSes) was one major point on the agenda of SG1. The Parallelism TS (see this draft) and the Transactional Memory TS (see this draft) have been finalized for publication, and the Concurrency TS and has been made ready for a vote and feedback by the National Bodies. GCC does not yet support those TSes but already has the main functionality required by the Transactional Memory TS through implementing a previous specification of the language constructs for transactions. SG1 is continuing to adding features in those areas, but these will target a version 2 of each of these TSes.

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Lenexa C++ Meeting Report (Core Language)

Lenexa C++ Meeting Report (Core Language)

gnu logoRed Hat sent four engineers to the spring C++ meeting this year, in Lenexa, Kansas, a suburb of Kansas City.  It was hosted by Perceptive Software, a division of Lexmark.  The meeting went very smoothly overall; while there were some disagreements they were pretty cordial.

The first disagreement came up during the Monday evening session when Bjarne was talking about his vision of C++17.  He wants to see multiple big new features, lest people get bored with C++ after another relatively minor update like C++14.  Google representatives and Herb Sutter (the Convener) pointed out that what they’ve been hearing from users is that they’re happier than ever with C++, and use of C++ has been increasing on available metrics, so what we’ve been doing seems to be working.  Personally, I’m happy to continue with Herb’s plan to do regular releases with whatever happens to be ready at the time, much like GCC releases.

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Red Hat Developer Toolset 3.1 now generally available

Red Hat Developer Toolset 3.1 now generally available

gnu logoToday, Red Hat has announced the general availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 3.1. Available through the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Program and related subscriptions, Red Hat Developer Toolset 3.1 streamlines application development on the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, enabling developers to compile applications once and deploy across multiple versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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Scala vs. Node.js as a RESTful backend server

Scala

VS.

node-jsI’ve been involved with full-stack development for a while now, especially stacks involving single page apps. When choosing to go with a single page webapp the backend concerns change. While any backend will do the job (think ruby, python, java, etc.) more emphasis is placed on the front-end stack as most of the time is spent in Javascript and less in the backend language since that is not where the UI logic resides. This is liberating in some senses as it allows one more freedom as language deficiencies become less of a problem. You don’t have to decide between a language based on how you like the backend html templating or framework, since that is no longer involved.  Think python tornado templates, JSF, or jade, three drastically different templating choices.  But none of that matters when going with a single page app in the browser.

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The Eclipse Developer’s guide to Clean Code (part 1)

Front_pic“Even bad code can function. But if code isn’t clean, it can bring a development organization to its knees”  — Clean Code

We spent 10 times more time reading code than writing it. Thus keeping code clean is essential for maintainability and company growth, but doing it by hand can be tedious.

Let’s take a look at some of the clean code practices and how we can use Eclipse to re-factor code faster.

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Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2014): Library

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2014): Library

gnu logoLast month I attended the ISO standardisation meeting for C++ in Urbana-Champaign. As usual I spent most of the week in the Library Working Group or Library Evolution Working Group. In LWG, about half the week was spent processing comments received from National Bodies during the ballots for the Technical Specification (TS) on C++ Extensions for Parallelism and the TS for C++ Extensions for Library Fundamentals, both of which were at the PDTS (public draft) stage.

LWG reviewed some changes to the Parallelism TS, based on National Body comments, more details of those changes can be found in Torvald’s report.

The Library Fundamentals TS received quite a few National Body comments, some of which were rejected or ruled to be out of scope for the first version of the TS, but some resulted in changes to the draft TS. One significant change to the PDTS was the removal of the generic versions of ntohs/htons/ntohl/htonl due to concerns about implementation difficulty and interference with the C library versions. The other changes to the PDTS are in the post-Urbana mailing as N4270 and N4288. With those changes the Library Fundamentals TS has moved to DTS stage. GCC’s implementations of any, optional and string_view will be updated soon to conform to the DTS.

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